Girls Encouraged to Consider Roles in Government

first_imgStory and photos by Jenna O’Donnell | TINTON FALLS – On Friday, several dozen high school girls sat down and chose an issue they cared about, then stood up and argued for it in front of a hypothetical school board.One of the issues was inspired by a team member’s frustration at her local high school, where the boys’ soccer fields are far superior to the one where the girls play. The team rallied around the cause and made an argument for a literal equal playing field.“We are proposing a new field that will benefit the boys’ and girls’ soccer teams equally,” a student from the group argued. Their platform: Women for the WIN.Running and Winning was the theme of the day­ – and the name of the event – an annual workshop held at Monmouth Regional High School, during which high school girls spend a nonpartisan day hearing from women in government before breaking into groups to take on the issues themselves.“Girls don’t always see role models in government,” said Marian Wattenbarger, a member of the American Association of University Woman (AAUW) of Northern Monmouth County who co-chaired the workshop on March 17. “So this is an opportunity.” AAUW, along with The League of Women Voters of Greater Red Bank, the Junior League of Monmouth County and the Red Bank Chapter of Hadassah sponsored the event, which is now in its eleventh year.“We started the day with the statistics of how poorly represented women are in government,” said Wattenbarger.That statistic shows that while more than half of the United States population is made up of women, the number of women in elected positions are far surpassed by men, particularly in New Jersey.“It does not reflect us,” said Linda Bricker, a member of the Junior League of Monmouth County and a chairperson on the steering committee for the event. “We’re just not represented the way we should be.”Workshop organizers would like to change that status quo, and they hope this event will inspire young women to take an interest in public life and politics, and give them the confidence to seek out leadership positions.Preparing their arguments for their chosen issue were (clockwise from left) Claire Hayes, 17, of Rumson Fair Haven High School; Rachel Lam, 17, of Middletown High School South; Deja Caton, 16, of Matawan Regional High School, and Shannon Ross, 17, of Ocean Township High School.During the workshop, 60 young women from ten local high schools gathered at Monmouth Regional High School to learn about how to get involved in public life from women who successfully won positions as mayors, councilwomen, county clerks, assemblywomen, state senators and more. Students spent the morning interviewing female leaders, including New Jersey State Senator Jennifer Beck, Assemblywoman Joann Downey, and Janice Fuller, Chief of Staff for Congressman Frank Pallone, on what it takes to run for office, how to face their fears and overcome challenges and how to choose positions on the issues.The girls then had an opportunity to take a position of their own. Students broke up into small groups for a “Finding Your Voice” exercise during which they chose an issue to be presented to a fictional school board. After taking a position, accounting for the pros and cons of their argument and proposing changes, the teams stood up and campaigned on platforms that included “Less HW=Less Stress,” “Press for Equal Dress,” “Earth Without Art is Just Eh,” and “Less Stress Leads to Success,” among others.“The only thing in common was that the issue was coming before a school board,” said Bricker. “The idea is to pick something in your community, which is your school, decide what your issues are and how you are going to make your argument.”Girls argued, sometimes passionately, for less restrictive dress codes at their schools, more free time to pursue their dreams and personal interests, and proposed a less stressful high school experience for overworked students.One group, arguing for more focus on creativity, asked their “school board” to protect funding for the arts.“We’re asking you to put a spotlight on creativity,” one student said. “Because you can memorize all the words in the dictionary, but if you lack creativity you cannot put them together in a sentence.”For organizers, the group sessions are a key part of the day in helping students from all different backgrounds find common ground and work together on an issue. They asked participating schools to send not the girls who were already in student leadership positions, but the ones who had the potential to lead.At the annual Running and Winning workshop, high school girls were encouraged to “find their voice.”“We look for the girl who, through this type of experience, might find her voice,” Bricker said, noting that her own daughter, who participated in the workshop several years prior, left with the confidence to run for student government at her large university. “We hope this kind of a day might tap into something.”Young women finished the day with a new grasp on the possibilities that lie ahead. Claire Haynes, 16, of Rumson Fair Haven High School said she most enjoyed speaking to women leaders during the morning session.“It made me want to get involved,” Haynes said, of the experience. “And It taught me a lot about local government. I didn’t know too much about it before.”This article was first published in the March 23-30, 2017 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Evolving Complexity

first_imgAnyone analyzing a scientific explanation should evaluate whether it explains the phenomenon or explains it away.  For instance, to say that bats have sonar because they evolved it provides little in the way of understanding of how or why that happened.  Recently, some scientific papers have directly addressed the topic of complex systems in biology.  How good a job are they doing at explaining complexity in an evolutionary context?Very interesting:  Ross and Arkin, in the lead article for a special issue on complex systems in PNAS,1 started this way: “There is great interest in complex systems in chemistry, biology, engineering, physics, and gene networks, among others.  The complexity comes from the fact that in many systems there are a large number of variables, many connections among the variables including feedback loops, and many, usually nonlinear, equations of motion, or kinetic and transport equations.”  Shortly later, they said, “Nowhere is the importance of complex dynamics and architectures clearer than in biological systems.”  Then they summarized the various papers in the issue: “Topics range from information processing in their signaling network and the organization of their metabolism, to how populations of differentiated cells communicate with one another to coordinate behavior, and to how evolution has arrived at different recurrent motifs of control and linked together different physiological functions.”    The reader will look in vain, however, for any further mention of the word evolution in Ross and Arkin’s article.  Each summary describes the characteristics of complexity in living systems, such as signal transduction, correlating metabolic flux measurements with functions, and the expressions of genes in networks.  The word design outnumbers evolution three to one: for example, “The boundaries between phenotypic regions yield a method for discussion of the tolerance of a system to large changes of its parameters and the identification of design principles.”Unsolved mystery.  Perhaps the most pertinent recent paper on the evolution of complex systems appeared February in PLoS Biology.2  It’s title sets the stage: “Wings, Horns, and Butterfly Eyespots: How Do Complex Traits Evolve?”  Antonio Monteiro and Ondrej Podlaha set the stage by assuming evolution:Throughout their evolutionary history, organisms have evolved numerous complex morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations to increase their chances of survival and reproduction.  Insects have evolved wings and flight, which allowed them to better disperse, beetles have grown horns to fight over females, and moths and butterflies have decorated their wings with bright circles of colored scales to scare off predators.  The way that most of these and other adaptations first evolved, however, is still largely unknown.  In the last two decades we have learned that novel traits appear to be built using old genes wired in novel ways, but it is still a mystery whether these novel traits evolve when genes are rewired de novo, one at a time, into new developmental networks, or whether clusters of pre-wired genes are co-opted into the development of the new trait.  The speed of evolution of novel complex traits is likely to depend greatly on which of these two mechanisms underlies their origin.  It is important, thus, to understand how novel complex traits evolve.Their presentation is like the chef who offers two choices on the menu: fish sticks, or fish cubes.  Both mechanisms they offered to explain complex systems were fully evolutionary.  Either the animals evolved their wings, horns and eyespots de novo, or they co-opted the equipment from previous complex systems with other functions and applied them in new ways.  They seem to like co-option better.  “Creating a developmental program de novo would involve linking many genes one-by-one, requiring each mutation to drift into fixation, or to confer some selective advantage at every intermediate step in order to spread in the population,” they said in the Darwinian spirit.  “While this lengthy process is not completely unlikely, it could be circumvented with fewer steps by recruiting a top regulator of an already existing gene network, i.e., by means of gene network co-option.”  The rest of the paper leaned toward this approach, since it apparently requires fewer miracles, as long as one accepts the prime miracle of the “already existing gene network.”    It’s interesting that this paper appeared the month of the 200th birthday of Darwin in the category “Unsolved Mystery.”  Articles in the Unsolved Mystery series, the heading explained, “discuss a topic of biological importance that is poorly understood and in need of research attention.”  One might think that this is the very mystery Darwin solved 150 years ago.  Monteiro and Podlaha made it look like evolutionary biologists are still at square one: “There is still much to do in order to fully understand how novel complex traits evolve,” their final paragraph began, before giving a final plug to their favored gene network co-option hypothesis.  Their paper did little more, though, than offer an experimental framework for distinguishing innovation from co-option.  Then they said, “This work is difficult and time consuming, but the question at its core—the genetic origin of new and complex traits—is probably still one of the most pertinent and fundamental unanswered questions in evolution today.”In the beginning, Genetics:  A specific example of evolutionary theory applied to a complex system may shed light on the effectiveness of evolutionary explanations.  Michael Rosbash attempted to explain biological circadian clocks in PLoS Biology last month.3  His article, “The Implications of Multiple Circadian Clock Origins,” started with a take-off on the Genesis creation story.  “In the beginning… Genetics has had an awesome impact on our understanding of basic processes like circadian rhythms,” he teased.  But understanding how the clocks emerged is a different matter.  Circadian clocks exist in cyanobacteria and maybe earlier: “These relationships indicate that a similar, basic clock mechanism was present in a common ancestor, before the separation of insects and mammals more than 500 million years ago,” he noted.  “Some argue that the relationship of basic clock mechanism and proteins extends to Neurospora, which would push back the common ancestor date even further.”    Rosbash noted the differences between the circadian clock systems of cyanobacteria and those of mammals.  This could either mean the function emerged early in the evolution of life, or that it arose twice: “the strong suggestion is that circadian rhythms have arisen at least twice, once in an ancestor of present-day cyanobacteria and then again in an ancestor of animals.”  While we’re speculating, let’s up the ante: “More than two evolutionary origins are also possible, as the different set of plant circadian proteins may indicate a third independent origin” (though he doubts this actually happened).    So how did these complex systems evolve?  He appealed to selective advantages.  “Finally, what were the original selective advantages, the driving forces, for the origins/development of rhythms in the eukaryotic and bacterial systems?” he asked.  It appears that living cyanobacteria and mammals make good use of diurnal cycles and timekeeping to regulate their motions.  In the end, though, all he could do was speculate: “So although circadian transcription may not be essential for some cyanobacterial timekeeping features, its temporal organization may have provided a progenitor with a sufficient selective advantage to drive the development of rhythms.”  He almost attributed purpose and will to the ancestors.  Don’t most orchestrators work on purpose with a design and a plan?  In a “photosynthetic progenitor of current-day cyanobacteria,” he imagined that transcription factors “developed the capacity to orchestrate transcription in response to the ever-present light�dark cycle, and eventually to anticipate that cycle in a transcription- and even light-independent manner.”    He ended by speculating that DNA repair mechanisms (involving multiple complex systems) linked light cycles to emerging clock systems: “Given the important role played by signal transduction in DNA repair, the relationship of DNA damage and repair to rhythms may have additional explanatory power, namely, the origin of circadian kinases.”Explanatory power – that is the question.  To what extent does speculative appeal to imaginary ancestors, comparisons between functioning gene networks, and the assumption of the creative power of natural selection provide explanatory power for the origin of these systems?1.  John Ross and Adam P. Arkin, “Complex systems: From chemistry to systems biology,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, published online before print April 20, 2009, doi: 10.1073/pnas.0903406106.2.  Antonio Monteiro and Ondrej Podlaha, “Wings, Horns, and Butterfly Eyespots: How Do Complex Traits Evolve?” Public Library of Science: Biology, Vol. 7, No. 2, e37 doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000037.3.  Michael Rosbash, “The Implications of Multiple Circadian Clock Origins,” Public Library of Science: Biology, Vol. 7, No. 3, e62 doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1000062.The tricks the Darwinians play should be obvious.  Over and over, evolution is the assumption, not the explanation: it evolved because it evolved.  Some PhD biochemist with a good grasp of philosophy of science and good baloney detecting skills should grab that second paper by Monterio and Podlaha and make it a poster child of the emptiness of evolutionary explanations.  Here, on the 200th birthday of the guy who made evolution famous, who supposedly explained everything, so that nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution, they had nothing to offer but unsolved mysteries, just-so stories, miracles and futureware.  It’s disgusting.  And remember – just last month there was a huge uproar in Texas about whether students should be able to learn the “strengths and weaknesses” of evolutionary theory.  Now you understand why the NCSE was so up in arms.  Teaching those things in their actual proportions would require a whole semester on the weaknesses, and a nanosecond on the strengths.    The news media, the school boards, the textbook writers and the courts are all resting on the quicksand of assumption that our academic labs are daily providing the solid evidence for Darwin’s theory needed to make it the sole dogma of the culture.  Day after day, week after week, month after month, year after year, Creation-Evolution Headlines has been bringing you the Darwin Party’s very best evidence.  We take you down under the superstructure, the gigantic monument to Darwin that pervades our culture, so that you can see the rotting pilings in quicksand on which it rests.  Would you want to trust it with your life?(Visited 20 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Darwinians Honor a Fraud

first_imgDevoted to Charles Darwin, Ernst Haeckel was not above fabricating data to make his hero look better.150 years ago, Phys.org reports, the German biologist Ernst Haeckel invented the word phylogeny and drew up Darwin’s ideas into a branching picture that replaced the Biblical tree of life (an actual, tangible tree as described in Genesis and Revelation) with an evolutionary metaphor. Darwin had sketched a branching diagram to show how speciation might occur, but it was Haeckel who drew all of the world’s organisms arising from a single trunk. Two German science historians from Jena, Haeckel’s hometown, tell how this happened.Drawing on Darwin’s theory of evolution, Haeckel created the first Darwinian phylogenetic ‘tree of life’ of organisms exactly 150 years ago in Jena, and published it in his major work, the ‘General morphology of organisms’. In the current issue of the journal Nature, the historians of science and science education, Prof. Uwe Hoßfeld und Dr. habil. Georgy S. Levit of Friedrich Schiller University Jena in Germany, commemorate this anniversary.“The idea of visually representing species and their development was already known at the time,” says Levit. “However, earlier ideas never took into account the principle of monophyly and natural selection in speciation.” This connection first emerged through the evolutionary theories of Charles Darwin. The British naturalist sketched in his diary an idea for a tree of life in 1837 and presented it in the form of a diagram in his ground-breaking work ‘On the origin of species’ in 1859. Haeckel took up Darwin’s theory of evolution in his 1866 book, ‘General morphology of organisms’, and drew the first phylogenetic ‘family tree of organisms’, or tree of life. “Phylogeny is the evolutionary history of organisms,” explains Hoßfeld. “Because Haeckel was the first actually to define this term, in that same work, he was also the only person capable of representing the first tree of life of this kind.” To be more precise, Haeckel designed the monophyletic tree of life, because it shows all three kingdoms – animals, plants and Protista (organisms that cannot be classified as a plant, animal or fungus) – arising from a common root (‘Moneren Radix’).This metaphor has clouded observation for 150 years. Today, more biologists are describing a “web of life” or “network of life” (for instance, see Evolution News & Views about the data from hybridization that confuse the tree image). In addition, the data from paleontology (e.g., the Cambrian Explosion), show patterns of independent emergence and stasis, not a branching tree. But because of Haeckel’s propaganda that employed visualization in place of hard evidence, biologists ever since have been frustrated trying to force-fit the facts of nature into this mythical metaphor.So do the German historians point this out? No. They have nothing but praise for Haeckel, who is also notorious for fudging his data in his famous drawings of “Haeckel’s embryos” that falsely depicted organisms replaying their evolutionary history during development. Old ideas die hard; Stephen Jay Gould lambasted Haeckel’s “recapitulation theory” (7/26/10, 3/08/05) but his embryo drawings still turn up in biology textbooks and science papers. The “tree of life” remains ubiquitous.No better method has been devised to date for illustrating biodiversity. New techniques and methodologies may have come into use, and trees of life are now presented as cladograms, diagrams, etc., but the principle remains the same. “It is quite simply the best and clearest way of representing the results of biological research in this area,” notes Hoßfeld.The journal Nature celebrated Haeckel’s tree of life, pleasing Hoßfeld no end.For us it is always a success when our scientific fields attract the attention they deserve,” says Hoßfeld, who has seen six of his articles published in Nature. “It shows us that there continues to be great interest in the history of science and science education, and that they are repeatedly able to make a contribution to current debate,” adds Levit, who has had three publications in the British journal. For Friedrich Schiller University itself, such publications are evidence that Jena’s long academic tradition is consistently able to produce up-to-the-minute research.Is it a “contribution” to current debate to cloud evidence with pictures? Like Phys.org, Nature mentions nothing about fraud. “As thousands of scientists and policymakers gather in Mexico this month for the COP13 summit on biodiversity … we should take a moment to celebrate the earliest ‘tree of life’ model of biodiversity.”It doesn’t seem to matter to these evolutionists that the branches have been repeatedly cut down and grafted in all kinds of contradictory ways (see example on Phys.org about where to put placoderms, titled “Our ideas about vertebrate evolution challenged by a new tree of life”).  Jonathan Keith’s “tree of life” posted on The Conversation looks vastly different from Haeckel’s. Keith seems to think we shouldn’t allow nasty facts to get in the way of a pretty picture. We don’t want to disturb the unwashed masses.You’ve seen them in popular science news, biology textbooks, wall plaques in museums, perhaps even as tattoos. Evolutionary trees are among the most instantly recognisable, ubiquitous and iconic images of science. At the end of his article, “How to grow an evolutionary tree,” he does ask, “Can you trust an evolutionary tree?” While giving room for skepticism, he concludes that we can trust these visualizations, at least the ones that try to tease out details of certain branches, like his favorite, the tree of mammals.Any evolutionary tree should be regarded with healthy scepticism. They are working hypotheses that are likely to be revised as new evidence comes to light.It is not possible to set aside all biases and preconceived ideas when inferring evolutionary trees, because even the methodology is based on assumptions about how evolution works.But the better one understands the models and methods, the more one appreciates that trees are not mere guesses, nor even summaries of expert opinion.They are products of careful and principled science informed by statistics.Keith makes an incoherent argument. On the one hand, he admits to biases and preconceived ideas. On the other hand, he simply appeals to authority. Trust the experts, he says; they’re doing their best (cf. 12/05/16). And we all know that statistics never lie.Would any of these Haeckel devotees ever take their “healthy skepticism” to the point of considering the possibility that the whole tree is a myth? Would they ever chop it down? Unlikely; it forms a key link in the materialist chain of molecules to man.Recommended resource: See the chapter on “Tree of Life” in Icons of Evolution by Jonathan Wells. There’s a summary in this article on ARN.org. In another article on ARN, he responds to Eugenie Scott’s criticisms.For fun, see our 2/01/07 article and commentary about Darwin’s sacred tree. (Visited 51 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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2019 Cab Cam | A unique kind of fieldwork in Logan County

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Ag Net’s Joel Penhorwood catches up with Skyler Foos of Integrated Ag Services as he’s out in the field doing some soil sampling in a Logan County field, near Rushsylvania. The two talk the unique equipment and the current status of Ohio farm fields in this video, sponsored by Homan Inc.“We are doing a high density soil sampling. We are out here in the field doing half acre grids,” said Foos.He also contributed some thoughts as far as fieldwork progress.“Down around where we’re from, the Urbana area, guys are getting out in the fields. I know they’ve been working a lot of ground and I even heard somebody planting some beans last week. Things are starting to come around — it’s going to get busy pretty soon.”last_img read more

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Announcing ReadWriteBiz, Our New Channel on Small-Medium Business

first_imgWe’re pleased to announce the launch of our fourth channel: ReadWriteBiz. This new subsite will be a resource and guide for small to medium businesses, so it’s targeted to an audience somewhere in between our ReadWriteStart channel (startups) and ReadWriteEnterprise (large companies). ReadWriteBiz is sponsored by Yola.com, a website builder and hosting service.We have a new writer for ReadWriteBiz, John Paul Titlow from Philadelphia, PA. Welcome John to the team!ReadWriteWeb continues to expand its content via channels, which are subsites focused on a particular niche. Expect to see more channels launched during 2010. Tags:#biz#Features Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting richard macmanus 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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SEA Games: PH team stuns host Malaysia in women’s football

first_imgFlags of SEA Games countries raised at Athletes Village Letran Knights pull through for injured Ambohot View comments Read Next The Malditas will next face Vietnam on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. at University of Malaya. PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games The squad, which even lost striker Eva Madarang to injury, thus boosted its chances for a medal as the tournament uses a single-round points system format. LATEST STORIES Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chiefcenter_img MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Football – Women’s Team: #MAS 1-2 #PHI #KL2017 #RisingTogether pic.twitter.com/XXladDeP14— Kuala Lumpur 2017 (@KL2017) August 15, 2017KUALA LUMPUR — The Philippine women’s football team hacked out a 2-1 triumph over host Malaysia to start its Southeast Asian Games campaign late Tuesday night.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutPatricia Impenido and Camille Rodriguez scored for the Malditas to sandwich a Malaysia goal at UiTM Stadium.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Man sworn in as lawyer by judge who sentenced him to prison as a teen 20 years ago Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspensionlast_img read more

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Geje Eustaquio, Filipinos banner ONE: Hero’s Ascent in Manila

first_imgBanario is fresh off a unanimous decision win over Rahul Raju back in November and that win was his sixth victory in seven matches. Tynanes, meanwhile, owns a win over Folayang when the two fought in December of 2012 and the undefeated Hawaiian will make his return to the cage after three years. Danny Kingad looks to pick up where he left off and sustain his strong form in 2019 after sweeping his three fights in 2018.Kingad (8-1) will take on Japan’s Tatsumitsu Wada in a bout between flyweight championship contenders.Thailand’s rising star Rodtang Jitmuangnon will return to the ONE Super Series on a Muay Thai bout against Tunisia’s Fahdi Khaled.ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? Moraes (17-3) was the first to score a victory when he submitted Eustaquio (11-6) via guillotine choke 3:54 into the second round of their March 2015 fight. Eustaquio got his revenge three years later when he earned a split decision win to take the flyweight strap. FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionA couple more Team Lakay fighters are also slated to fight in the card with former featherweight champion Honorio Banario (14-7) taking on undefeated Lowen Tynanes (9-0) in the quarterfinals of the ONE lightweight World Grand Prix.The winner in the eight-man tournament will get a crack at the lightweight title that Eduard Folayang currently holds. SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte LATEST STORIES UST’s EJ Laure to skip UAAP Season 81 View comments TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviñocenter_img SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss MOST READ SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Rodtang made his ONE Super Series debut in September with a dominating decision win over Sergio Wielzen while Khaled, who trains in Thailand, will make his debut in the promotion.In another Super Series bout, Brown Pinas of Holland will take on Bangpleenoi Petchyindee Academy.Pinas looks to build on his knockout of Yohan Fairtex in November while Bangpleenoi will make his ONE Championship debut.Elias Mahmoudi of France will make his ONE Super Series debut against Japan’s Yukinori Ogasawara.Back into the mixed martial arts picture, South Korea’s Sung Jong Lee decided to remain in the featherweight division and he will fight the debuting Tang Kai of China.Malaysia’s Mohammed Bin Mahmoud is set to take on Hiroaki Suzuki in the Super Series.Starting off the card are strawweights Egi Rozten of Indonesia and Himanshu Kaushik of India.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Photo from ONE ChampionshipMANILA, Philippines—ONE Championship is starting off 2019 with a bang with its first trilogy set as ONE world flyweight champion Geje Eustaquio puts his title on the line against rival Adriano Moraes in ONE: Hero’s Ascent on January 25 at Mall of Asia Arena.Eustaquio and Moraes split their first two title meetings and they will now have a chance to settle things once and for all in Team Lakay’s home country.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issuelast_img read more

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21 days agoNorwich City boss Farke: I’m at the right place

first_imgNorwich City boss Farke: I’m at the right placeby Freddie Taylor21 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveDaniel Farke says he feels like he is the “right place” at Norwich City. The German will rack up 100 league matches in charge of the Canaries this weekend when his side face Aston Villa at Carrow Road.”I feel that I’m totally in the right place. I enjoy my life here and I like the challenge to create something special, and we are creating something special at the moment,” he said.”I feel really honoured and blessed and look forward to be allowed to work in this responsible role for such a long time. You can’t take it for granted but it would be a great honour to be here even longer.”Then hopefully one day we can look back in this spirit and I would be happy if the people can say, ‘Okay, he’s done alright and we’ll take this’.”To be honest, I don’t look back too much. It was mentioned to me in the beginning of the week so you have to be unbelievably thankful to the key people in our club – to our owners Delia and Michael, to Stuart (Webber) and to our board but also to our supporters to trust me and allow me to help the yellow shirts to succeed.”I am humble and just thankful that I’m allowed to plan this extraordinary role for this amazing club and it’s a great privilege.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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