WLAX : Tumolo looks to break out of early slump

first_img Comments Gary Gait is looking for Michelle Tumolo to do three things: dodge, feed her teammates and finish. He needs her to accomplish all three of these things within her role at attack so no matter what the situation, the team can get the ball into the net.‘That’s always been one of our needs from behind the cage,’ Gait said.After having the highest single-season totals in points (74) and assists (37) for a freshman in program history a season ago, Tumolo has been off to a slower start this season. She is lagging behind the total number of points she had at this time last year, with 27 points through eight games. And her team is off to a slow start, too, with just a 3-5 record after being ranked No. 5 in preseason. Gait said her continued success, as well as that of the team, relies on her ability to master those three elements to combat the level of pressure she’s seeing in her second season.Although Gait admits this is a tall order for the sophomore — he said he has never had a player proficient at all three tasks — he said if anyone can do it, Tumolo can.‘Last year she was able to be a feeder, and a lot of teams didn’t go pressure her behind, and it allowed her to have a lot of success,’ Gait said. ‘But now they’re pressuring her behind and making it tougher. And when that happens, you’ve got to become a dodger.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAs Tumolo reacts to increased attention, she has trouble ignoring her feeder instincts. She relies more on her strong passing abilities as opposed to capitalizing on opportunities herself and scoring more goals, as Gait would like her to do. Her struggles have mirrored those of her team as a whole.Tumolo’s problems stem from the pressure she’s encountered from opposing defenses. After her banner freshman season, as well as the time she spent playing for the U.S. national team, the attention is hardly a surprise. Nonetheless, senior attack Tee Ladouceur said the defensive focus on Tumolo was giving her some trouble.‘She’s been face-guarded a lot this year,’ Ladouceur said. ‘And there’s a lot more pressure being put on her by other teams’ defenses, so I think it’s a little harder for her.’Tumolo’s reaction has been to fall back on what she said she knows and loves: assisting. Last season she finished 11th in the nation with 37 assists. But this season, she does not have the same assist totals. The added defensive pressure keeps her from completing the passes that set up SU goals so often last season.But Tumolo remains slightly hesitant to take on the ‘dodging’ role and drive to the net.‘Gary (Gait) keeps telling me I need to go to goal,’ Tumolo said. ‘I don’t know why. I love assisting, so I look to pass before I shoot. But I do need to go to goal more.’In recent games against No. 2 Northwestern and Rutgers, Tumolo has been better about embracing her three jobs. She combined for four goals and six assists in the two games, equating to one Syracuse win and one loss.The team’s next game is not until Monday at Dartmouth, so Tumolo can use the time to practice that offensive aggression.Ladouceur said she began seeing improvements in her fellow attack even in the games before Northwestern.‘She’s been playing through it, and in the past few games, she’s had a couple goals and a couple assists,’ Ladouceur said. ‘And I think she’s on her way to becoming even better this season.’As Gait and his team look to improve their record and put together two consecutive wins for the first time this season, the pressure will be on Tumolo to execute. When she gets shut down by a defender, she has to beat her defender one-on-one instead of looking to pass, Gait said.Gait said having a player who can feed, dodge and finish will put Syracuse on a level with the best teams in the nation.‘The top three or four teams, they have success because there’s somebody to score from behind,’ Gait said. ‘You go to double (team), they become a feeder. You leave them open when you slide up top, they become a finisher. That’s what we need.’[email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on March 28, 2011 at 12:00 pmlast_img read more

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Rep Hughes invites all area residents to 4th Annual Veterans Job Fair

first_img Categories: Featured news,Hughes News,News 08May Rep. Hughes invites all area residents to 4th Annual Veterans Job Fair Tags: #SB center_img Event to feature 65 local employers looking for talented employeesState Rep. Holly Hughes, R-Montague, vice chair of the House Military and Veterans Committee, encourages veterans and non-veterans alike to attend the 4th Annual Veterans Job Fair on Friday, May 15 aboard the USS LST 393 Veterans Museum in Muskegon.The event was started in 2012 by Rep. Hughes and Dave Eling, director of the Veterans’ Center of Muskegon County. The Veterans’ Center of Muskegon County has helped matched hundreds of potential employees with employers since its inception.  Last year, over 90 employers from various industries were on hand to meet with prospective employees.“Returning veterans face many challenges, including higher rates of unemployment,” said Rep. Hughes.  “This event is designed to be a one-stop shop for bringing together our talented veterans and local workers with our wonderful area employers in a relaxing and stress-free environment.  Last year, of those seeking employment a third were veterans.”The Veterans Job Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the USS LST 393 Veterans Museum, 560 Mart St. in Muskegon.For more information, contact Rep. Hughes at 877-633-0331, via email at [email protected] or the Veterans’ Center of Muskegon County by calling (231) 724-7143 or visiting www.muskegonveterans.com.###last_img read more

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Scientific challenges and opportunities for remediating radioactive waste

Scientists and engineers have worked decades to find solutions, particularly for chemical and radioactive waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state. While the origins of the waste have been well documented, tank-to-tank transfers, mixing, and previous remediation attempts have complicated the chemistry and physics of the material. A thorough understanding of underlying scientific issues provides a stronger foundation for engineering solutions, giving decision makers more confidence to move forward with fewer delays.Scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, cleanup contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, and Washington State University scoured scientific literature to identify research that has informed current understanding of tank waste. Much has been accomplished, including beginning the construction of a vitrification plant to solidify this waste for safe storage. Perhaps the greatest remaining challenge is to develop the scientific underpinnings of the complex particle interactions that will occur when waste is removed from the tanks and pumped through pipes for further treatment and vitrification. Previous work at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy user facility, helped develop an empirical model of the materials inside the tanks, but more work is needed to predict how the waste will behave during processing. Recent advances in aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, in situ microscopy, and theoretical modeling across scales show promise. Information from such studies, coupled with the ability to transport radioactive materials to EMSL and use its atom probe tomography, could allow scientists to build robust predictive physics-based models to inform and guide cleanup efforts. One of the nation’s enduring scientific challenges has been to find effective ways of remediating millions of gallons of chemical and radioactive waste remaining from Cold War activities. Now a team of experts has combed through more than 100 studies to determine what is known of the complex chemical and rheological aspects of the waste and identify scientific issues that must be resolved to finally reach the end goal of cleanup. Journal information: Environmental Science & Technology Nuke waste debate: Turn it into glass or encase in cement? Provided by Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory More information: Reid A. Peterson et al. Review of the Scientific Understanding of Radioactive Waste at the U.S. DOE Hanford Site, Environmental Science & Technology (2017). DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.7b04077 Understanding scientific complexities of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site could guide cleanup efforts. Credit: Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Explore further Citation: Scientific challenges and opportunities for remediating radioactive waste (2018, April 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-scientific-opportunities-remediating-radioactive.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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