Analysts see looming problems for gas-fired power plant financing

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Buoyed by renewable energy builds, financing for power generation assets sped up in the summer months after slowing during March and April. Natural gas-fired generation, however, is facing its own set of uncertainties.As the U.S. locked down in response to the coronavirus pandemic, disrupted construction schedules and strained equipment supply chains slowed capital to a trickle. “Through April, May, June, we definitely sort of slowed down in new activity during that period,” said Eamon Nolan, a partner in project development and finance at law firm Vinson & Elkins LLP who said ongoing financings wrapped more or less as expected. “Most of the deals that were in the hopper already were progressing.”The trend toward renewables has bolstered project finance debt and equity markets, with demand for new projects propelling new financings through the summer after the lull in the spring months. “There’s real demand for much more utility-scale, much more residential-scale, so there’s going to be no slowdown in that space for the foreseeable future,” Nolan said. “I think it’s the other markets, perhaps, that are going to suffer. Gas-fired power plants are going to struggle.”One problem facing gas-fired generators is that larger states within the U.S., primarily California, are turning away from natural gas as they try to curb carbon emissions, said Nolan. Another issue is investor divestitures from fossil fuels.“Investor capital is putting serious pressure on sponsors to ensure that they have significant components of their strategies in the renewable space,” Nolan said. “A lot of the investors are under pressure from their own base of contributors,” including pension funds.Regardless, Nolan said, “Natural gas is going to have a significant role in the next 10 years” as renewables continue to be built, even if there may not be a flurry of gas-fired financings in the short term. Even as investors divest from natural gas, many developers and regions will rely on it as a transition fuel.[Fotios Tsarouhis]More ($): Gas-fired plant financings may face hurdles as renewable projects make gains Analysts see looming problems for gas-fired power plant financinglast_img read more

Continue reading


IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings through June 6

first_imgIMCA Late Models – 1. Matt Ryan, Davenport, Iowa, 419; 2. Justin L. Kay, Wheatland, Iowa, 347; 3. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque, Iowa, 345; 4. Andy Nezworski, Buffalo, Iowa, 304; 5. Dalton Simonsen, Fairfax, Iowa, 291; 6. Lake Knutti, Chadwick, Ill., 264; 7. Cory Dumpert, York, Neb., 262; 8. Todd Malmstrom, Hampton, Ill., 251; 9. Jeff Aikey, Cedar Falls, Iowa, 194; 10. Dylan Schmer, Aurora, Neb., 186; 11. Les Siebert, York, Neb., 182; 12. Terry Neal, Ely, Iowa, 179; 13. Jim Johnson, Plainview, Neb., 174; 14. Nelson Vollbrecht, Stanton, Neb., and Curtis Glover, Runnells, Iowa, both 173; 16. Denton Duncan, Ravenna, Neb., 171; 17. Eric Pollard, Peosta, Iowa, 170; 18. Todd Cooney, Pleasant Hill, Iowa, 169; 19. Chase Osborne, Battle Creek, Neb., 166; 20. Robert Osborne, Norfolk, Neb., 162.  Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods – 1. Chase Rudolf, Prole, Iowa, 1,017; 2. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, 836; 3. Keith Brown Jr., Pittsburg, Calif., 813; 4. Guy Ahlwardt, Antioch, Calif., 783; 5. Cole Carver, Apache Junction, Ariz., 778; 6. David Jones, Chandler, Ariz., 750; 7. Taylor Kuehl, Cave Creek, Ariz., 707; 8. Mark Harrison, Coolidge, Ariz., 701; 9. Cody Thompson, Sioux City, Iowa, 686; 10. Justin Svoboda, David City, Neb., 678; 11. Mark Madrid, Laveen, Ariz., 639; 12. Kevin Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif., 585; 13. Hunter Longnecker, Woodward, Iowa, 581; 14. Michael Egurola Jr., Tucson, Ariz., 567; 15. Brady Bjella, Williston, N.D., 558; 16. Dakota Sproul, Hays, Kan., 556; 17. Kyle Olson, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 555; 18. Brian Osantowski, Columbus, Neb., 542; 19. Ty Weidner, Chandler, Ariz., 533; 20. Fred Ryland, Brentwood, Calif., 532.  IMCA Modifieds – 1. David Goode Jr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 977; 2. Chris Morris, Taylor, Texas, 877; 3. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 866; 4. Zachary Madrid, Tucson, Ariz., 853; 5. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 784; 6. Jeffrey Hoegh, New Caney, Texas, 779; 7. Jeff “Bubba” Stafford Jr., Wittmann, Ariz., 736; 8. Kelly Shryock, Fertile, Iowa, 723; 9. Kevin Green, Waco, Texas, 720; 10. Chris Elliott, Abilene, Texas, 676; 11. Tyler Mecl, Queen Creek, Ariz., 634; 12. David Goode Sr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 621; 13. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 620; 14. Kollin Hibdon, Pahrump, Nev., 618; 15. Tim Ward, Chandler, Ariz., 588; 16. Beau Begnaud, Spring, Texas, 581; 17. Jake Pike, Pahrump, Nev., 571; 18. Eric Tomlinson, Waco, Texas, 548; 19. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, Iowa, 547; 20. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb., 535.  IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 1,097; 2. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 1,004; 3. A.J. Dancer, Red Rock, Texas, 882; 4. Cody Center, Mesa, Ariz., 793; 5. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 788; 6. Mike Nichols, Harlan, Iowa, 786; 7. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 729; 8. Shelby Williams, Bonham, Texas, 679; 9. Bryan Schutte, Wayne, Okla., 676; 10. Gary Williams, Bonham, Texas, 657; 11. William “Joey” McCullough, Phoenix, Ariz., 624; 12. Lonnie Foss, Glendale, Ariz., 615; 13. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb., 590; 14. Gene Henrie, Cedar City, Utah, 570; 15. Dennis Bissonnette, Stephenville, Texas, 548; 16. Jay Schmidt, Tama, Iowa, 534; 17. Kyle Pfeifer, Hill City, Kan., 514; 18. Calvin Lange, Humboldt, Iowa, 494; 19. Kevin Opheim, Mason City, Iowa, 484; 20. Donavon Smith, Lake City, Iowa, 472.  IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Kenneth Duke, Selinsgrove, Pa., 456; 2. Andy Shouse, Oklahoma City, Okla., 378; 3. Rod Craddock, Alvin, Texas, 362; 4. Zach Newlin, Millerstown, Pa., and Jacob Gomola, Seneca, Pa., both 324; 6. Tyler Harris, Vidor, Texas, 322; 7. Larry McVay, Bordentown, N.J., 317; 8. Mike Oliver, San Antonio, Texas, 314; 9. Mike Moore, Des Moines, Iowa, 309; 10. Dustyn Welch, Bryan, Texas, 302; 11. Jacob Harris, Vidor, Texas, and Mike Houseman, Des Moines, Iowa, both 301; 13. Ryan Lynn, Hollidaysburg, Pa., 300; 14. Jonathon J. Jones (12J), Irvona, Pa., and Douglas Dodson, Middletown, Pa., both 299; 16. Scott Lutz, Jonestown, Pa., 298; 17. Kyle Ganoe, Thompsontown, Pa., 297; 18. John Walp, Wapwallopen, Pa., 291; 19. Kyle Rasmussen, Clovis, Calif., 279; 20. Grant Champlin, Hanford, Calif., 274. center_img Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods – 1. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 1,023; 2. James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, 990; 3. Gregory Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 926; 4. Larry Underwood, Temple, Texas, 696; 5. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 682; 6. Chris Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 572; 7. Chris Cogburn, Robinson, Texas, 498; 8. Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, 496; 9. Kaden Honeycutt, Willow Park, Texas, 467; 10. James McCreery, Midlothian, Texas, 455; 11. Jon White Jr., Red Oak, Texas, 420; 12. Austin Moore, Axtell, Texas, 415; 13. Casey Brunson, Lott, Texas, 385; 14. James Skinner, Burleson, Texas, 378; 15. Jeff Shepperd, Waco, Texas, 369; 16. Garett Rawls, Elm Mott, Texas, 346; 17. Blaine Shives, Leonard, Texas, 344; 18. Brandon Geurin, Robinson, Texas, 336; 19. Trevor Egbert, Salado, Texas, and Jake Upchurch, Red Oak, Texas, both 334. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Leah Wroten, Independence, Iowa, 657; 2. Tathan Burkhart, Hays, Kan., and Cody Williams, Minneapolis, Kan., both 634; 4. Kaden Reynolds, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 609; 5. Dylan Nelson, Adel, Iowa, 596; 6. Cory Probst, Brewster, Minn., 595; 7. Brady J. Bencken, Oakley, Kan., 563; 8. Braxton Berry, Colby, Kan., 561; 9. Corey Madden, Avoca, Iowa, 540; 10. Joe Vlasity, Glendale, Ariz., 518; 11. John Watson, Des Moines, Iowa, 511; 12. David Norquest, York, Neb., 495; 13. Jeff Ware, Columbus, Neb., and Chuck Madden Jr., Avoca, Iowa, both 487; 15. Shannon Anderson, New Virginia, Iowa, 483; 16. Brandon Nielsen, Spencer, Iowa, 466; 17. Cody Nielsen, Spencer, Iowa, 456; 18. Drew Barglof, Sioux Rapids, Iowa, 436; 19. Tim Gonska, Brainerd, Minn., 432; 20. Scott Tenney, Yuma, Ariz., 429. Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Steven Bevills, Granbury, Texas, 816; 2. Terry Tritt, York, Neb., 693; 3. John Gill, Marshalltown, Iowa, 633; 4. Ramsey Meyer, Pierce, Neb., 610; 5. Anthony Vandenberg, Dublin, Texas, and Kaleb Watson, Mineral Wells, Texas, both 594; 7. Howard Watson, Weatherford, Texas, 579; 8. Brian Schoenbaum, Killeen, Texas, 527; 9. Harold Clifton, Stephenville, Texas, 475; 10. Derek Cates, Woodway, Texas, 459; 11. Denny Berghahn Jr., Plattsmouth, Neb., 453; 12. Kody Crofutt, Dublin, Texas, 443; 13. Alex Dostal, Glencoe, Minn., and Kaytee DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, both 429; 15. Shawn Hein, Beatrice, Neb., 405; 16. Darwin “Bubba” Brown Jr., Jackson, Minn., 401; 17. Barry Taft, Argyle, Iowa, 399; 18. Clifton Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 398; 19. Oliver Monson, Humboldt, Iowa, 388; 20. Nathan Wahlstrom, Beatrice, Neb., 368.last_img read more

Continue reading


VIDEO: New York Police Officer Sucker-punched

first_imgNelson Jimenez, 31, launched his attack in front of a crowd of bystanders who had gathered on a sidewalk near 183rd Street and Davidson Avenue in University Heights to watch the arrest of 27-year-old robbery suspect Yoemdy Castro, law enforcement sources said.In the footage, you can see the officer standing over the suspect who is lying face down on the pavement being cuffed by another officer. Suddenly Jimenez who is pacing around in the background can be seen striking the standing officer in the side of the head knocking his hat off. The officer who was struck immediately turns around and fires his Taser, but it’s unclear if it struck Jimenez.Jimenez then runs away, with the cop close behind, the video shows.Spectators can be heard cheering on the suspect, imploring the suspect to “run.”Officers later caught and arrested Jimenez in a nearby bodega, law enforcement sources said. Charges against him are pending.A second cop who responded to the fracas was also punched in the head in an off-camera incident, according to sources.The suspect in that assault, Brandee Isom, 25, was arrested and charged with assault and obstructing governmental administration, sources said. Amid the death and disease in New York, an NYPD police officer helping another cop during an arrest in the Bronx Tuesday is suddenly sucker-punched by a man wearing a protective mask who was standing behind him and it is all caught on cell phone video.last_img read more

Continue reading


New ‘Missing Link’ Claim Imagines Human Face on a Fish

first_img(Visited 52 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The Darwin-drenched phrase “missing link” popped up again, this time in a story that claims humans got their faces from a fish.“Extraordinary ‘missing link’ fossil fish found in China” (PhysOrg).“Scientist hails ‘jaw-dropping’ fish fossil discovery” (BBC News).“Fish fossil suggests our skeleton evolved face first” (New Scientist).OK, what’s up with that?  It needs to be “spectacular” to be “news,” so reporters tend to make everything eye-grabbing with words like “extraordinary” and “jaw-dropping,” but this one by John Long (The Conversation) got a little over the top:A spectacular new “missing link” fossil has been unearthed in China. The 419 million year old armoured fish, called Entelognathus, meaning “complete jaw” solves an age-old debate in science. For palaeontologists this fish is as big as finding the Higgs-Boson particle because of its immense significance to our understanding of early vertebrate evolution.This is arguably one of the most exciting fossil discoveries in the past century since Archaeopteryx, the first fossil to bridge the gap between dinosaurs and birds.After soaking the articles in an acid bath to dissolve away the hype, what is left?  John Long’s Conversation piece seems largely a screed against creationists (“those minority groups within society who for some or other reason do not believe in evolution”), so we must look elsewhere for the data.They’re calling it Entelognathus (“complete jaw”), and claiming it resolves an old debate whether placoderms were the ancestors of bony fish and cartilaginous fish.  Its evolutionary value, though, is tempered with some upset: “This is an unexpected discovery that inverts schoolbook teaching on the evolution of bony skulls,” the BBC News said.“Up until now it had been thought that the anatomical peculiarities of bony fishes – the group that would eventually give rise to human beings – are specialisations that arose later in vertebrate evolutionary history in our own bony fish lineage.”“But now that narrative has been turned on its head.“Under their own admission, they are talking about a narrative – not necessarily a fact of science.  The value of an upside-down narrative looks dubious.  John Long presented the impression of a virtually seamless fossil transitional sequence that makes the term “missing link” a misnomer.  Why, then, did the BBC say this?Scientists say that the evolution of jaws is one of the key episodes in the evolution of vertebrates, but the gap between jawed and jawless vertebrates is so large that it is hard to work out the individual evolutionary steps in the transition.It appears that all Entelognathus shows is that some bony fish traits appeared in this placoderm, making their appearance earlier than expected.  It does not say how an unguided process of mutations produced things as complex as multi-boned jaws, semicircular canals in the ears, and copulatory organs.  Moreover, this fossil cannot explain the cartilaginous fish:Dr Friedman says that the fossil adds weight to the theory that many classic bony fish features were evolved “very deep in our family tree, before bony fish split from sharks”.“This means that we – as in bony fishes – are the ones who have held on to more ancient structures, while it is the sharks that have gone off and done something new and interesting in an evolutionary sense.In other words, the expectation that placoderms were “primitive” has been deflated (see New Scientist).  In addition, sharks and rays can not be considered primitive, either.  So now, evolutionists have two problems when there were one: (1) how Entelognathus got “many classic bony fish features” by mutations and selection, and (2) how sharks did something “new and interesting in an evolutionary sense” (if one pardons the oxymoron).  “It challenges the way we think about the evolution of modern skeletons,” New Scientist says.“The work further reshuffles the deep identities of living groups, revising the deep tree of modern vertebrate groups – including our own remote ancestry,” says Michael Coates at the University of Chicago.So despite John Long’s over-the-top rhetoric which he banged on the heads of evolution skeptics, other scientists appear to see this fossil as a kind of good-news, bad-news joke for Darwinism.  Nature News calls it a “piscine mash-up,” i.e., an unexpected mosaic of traits.  Earlier evolutionists got it all wrong; now it’s time to overcome inertia, clean up and start over:This inversion of a classic scenario in vertebrate evolution raises an obvious question: how did we get it so wrong? The status of sharks as surrogate ancestors seems well established, but this is an illusion of dogmatic repetition combined with spurious portrayals of present-day cartilaginous fishes as unchanged ‘living fossils’. The popular model of a shark-like ancestor is, in the end, more a hangover of the ‘great chain of being’ of ancient philosophy and pre-Darwinian archetypes than a product of modern comparative biology and phylogenetic ‘tree thinking’. Added to this conceptual inertia is a historically compartmentalized approach to studying early vertebrate groups that made it too easy to dismiss shared similarities — the head and shoulder exoskeleton of placoderms and bony fishes, for example — as independent innovations without adequate evidence.Over the past decade or so, new fossilsand re-examinations of old ones have forced palaeontologists to look beyond the confines of traditional classifications and reconsider the coherence of textbook assemblages such as placoderms and acanthodians, and their relationships to extant gnathostomes. Perhaps more than any of these discoveries, Entelognathus demands a major rethink of where fossils fit relative to modern lineages, and how these living groups came to acquire their characteristic traits. It will take time to fully digest the implications of such a remarkable fossil, but it is clear that a major reframing of our understanding of early gnathostome evolution is now in full swing.Any major reframing of understanding presupposes what passed for understanding in the past was very poorly framed.  Mr. Long, though, ended his article celebrating his new hero:For me the really exciting thing about Entelognathus is that even in the 21st century palaeontologists are still making really big discoveries that fill in major missing gaps in our knowledge about the evolution of the modern fauna.All fossils touted as “missing links” are contentious to some, those minority groups within society who for some or other reason do not believe in evolution. For these people news of Entelognathus will be challenging, but most will simply ignore it as it doesn’t abide with their world view.Yet all of these disbelievers still rely on evolution in their daily lives, as new vaccines and antibiotics or new crops bred to withstand environmental extremes to feed us, are all advances in science underpinned by evolutionary principals [sic].So believe it or not, evolution is helping everyone one of us on the planet, every day to live better lives. Thanks Entelognathus, you’re a real hero.The paper by Min Zhu et al., published by Nature, was significantly more cautious in its interpretation: e.g., “A phylogenetic analysis places the new form near the top of the gnathostome stem group but does not fully resolve its relationships to other placoderms.”  The authors did not explicitly state where the fossil was found, who found it, what condition it was in, or how it was dated.Isn’t it uncanny how all the Darwin-imprimatur outlets get the artwork simultaneously?  The artist renditions are drawn to favor the evolutionary story.  This time they gave the fish a practically human face.  All it needs is a caption, saying, “Me fish obeying Charlie, evolving human num-nums.”  Good grief.Coming from China, this fossil needs a good looking over by independent authorities, to ensure some peasant didn’t glue a bony fish head onto a placoderm body.  Even assuming it is fully authentic, nothing about this specimen looks primitive.  It doesn’t help evolutionists, either, despite Mr. Long’s rush to judgment.  Who is ignoring it?  Who is finding this fossil at odds with his world view?  Darwine does strange things to the mind, especially in the upside-down position.last_img read more

Continue reading


Soccer City one of world’s best: Blatter

first_img3 June 2010 South Africa’s majestic Soccer City Stadium, venue for both the opening and final match of the 2010 Fifa World Cup™, has won rave reviews from Fifa president Sepp Blatter, who described it as “a five-star stadium” and one of the most beautiful in the world. Speaking during the official stadium hand-over ceremony in Johannesburg on Wednesday morning, Blatter said Soccer City – which resembles an African calabash with its round shape and charming patchwork of colours – was “one of the best venues” in the world. “This is a great day for Fifa, to be here at this magnificent stadium,” Blatter said. “The minister of sport, Mr Stofile, said Soccer City is the flagship for South Africa and the African continent. I will go further and say this stadium is a flagship of the world. “It is one of the most beautiful stadiums; I can compare it with Wembley Stadium just outside London.”A job well done Blatter told South Africans that they should be proud of their efforts to make the World Cup a success. “Yes this is a Fifa World Cup, but the people who have done the homework and the hard work are South Africans. We would therefore want to express thanks to them. “What will happen at this stadium is part of history – you will have eight games played by some of the best teams. Some of the best players in the world are going to play in this venue. Now that the stadiums are ready, the whole world will now focus on South Africa. “The world is now going through emotions, waiting for the games to begin.” Blatter said that one of his wishes was to see Nelson Mandela at the opening game between hosts South Africa and Mexico on 11 June. “The biggest legacy of this World Cup will be the celebration of African humanity, and no one better represents that than Nelson Mandela. We hope that Madiba will be at the opening game here; this has been part of his legacy, and he has worked hard for this project.”Waiting for the world Speaking on behalf of the South African government, Sport and Recreation Minister Makhenkesi Stofile said he had no doubt that Africa’s first Fifa World Cup would be “like no other; it will be different in many ways. “We have travelled a long road to be where we are, we have experienced setbacks, but importantly, we have tasted many victories,” Stofile said. “This has been a unique journey for this country. Our stadiums are all ready, the road and infrastructure is in place. We are now waiting for the people to come and be part of this event.” Following the Soccer City handover, Blatter also opened the International Broadcast Centre – the hub of broadcast production for the World Cup – which is located next to the stadium. Source: 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Organising Committeelast_img read more

Continue reading


Cape Cod Style Homes Are Difficult to Heat

first_imgOne of the great ironies in construction (I bet you didn’t even know that construction could be ironic) is that Cape Cod style houses perform pretty poorly on Cape Cod. The year-round sea breezes wash right through a Cape building frame, making them chilly and uncomfortable in the winter months.How did Cape Cod style houses (which perform not-so-great in the winter) become popular in New England? Maybe the name was a marketing scheme? And how can we address the air leakage and heat loss issues to make Capes more comfortable? GBA Encyclopedia: Vented or Unvented Attic?Fine Homebuilding: Two ways to insulate attic kneewalls Many rooms in a small footprintThe second floor framing in Cape Cod style houses packs a lot of living into a compact space. In as little as a 600-square-foot footprint, one can fit a 4-bedroom, 2-bath, 1100-square-foot home. For the price and availability, Capes can be quite a deal. Getting heat upstairsHeat distribution is the first area of concern. Most heating system and insulation issues with Capes stem from their having been built in the cheap-oil era. In 1950, insulation was an afterthought and heating was dirt cheap. It’s the rare Cape which has had these shortcomings fully addressed since its construction.Sometimes the second floor isn’t piped for heat at all. On other occasions, the hot water pipes are run through the walls. When the baseboard units are on the opposite side of the house, hot water pipes are often run through the kneewall space outside the attic insulation. All of these are exciting ways to lose heat (or, in the case of the unheated second floor, not gain enough).Each problem has its own solution. If the second floor isn’t heated, it might make sense to have heating baseboard or ducting installed. No amount of fans or wishful thinking will move enough heat from the first floor of a Cape to make it comfortable.If the hot water pipes for the second floor baseboards run through the exterior walls, well, you have a more challenging problem. If the exterior walls are uninsulated, dense-pack them with cellulose; this will also insulate the pipes.If the walls are insulated, try to determine whether the pipes run inside the insulation. (I know… that’s not easy. I use a fiber-optic boroscope and infrared camera to look inside the wall cavity). If not, you’ll need to reinsulate that cavity and put some thermal resistance between the pipe and outside sheathing. However, that same framing, which makes great use of space, also leaks conditioned air like crazy. If some half-assed attempt to ventilate has been made, odds are very good the second floor will be frigid come January. BLOGS BY ERIC NORTH How to Insulate and Air-Seal Pull-Down Attic StairsHow to Insulate and Air Seal an Attic HatchCan Switching to a Dual-Flush Toilet Save Heat?Essential Energy-Audit EquipmentThe Journal of Poor HomebuildingFiberglass versus Cellulosecenter_img Where will you locate your air barrier?Insulation and air sealing can be problematic in a Cape. The kneewall framing usually has built-in bookshelves, drawers and closets. The kneewall sits on top of the first floor joists, meaning that interior air is usually flowing under the kneewall. Finally, the tops of the kneewalls usually aren’t sealed. Much more conditioned air than you’d like flows up the wall slopes and out the attic cap.There are three possible approaches to insulating and air sealing a Cape.One can adopt an unvented approach and seal the whole thing. (If you choose this approach, you’d better have moisture under control).You can insulate the roof deck and vent the attic. This vented approach is challenging in a Cape, as the ventilation needs a clear path from soffit to peak. The eaves need to be sealed to prevent unwanted unconditioned air from wind washing the insulation (I’m looking at you, ocean winds), and the tops of the kneewalls need to be sealed around the vents.Finally, they can be insulated at the horizontal and vertical flats. In this case, the tops and bottoms of the kneewalls need to be air sealed with blocking.Cape Cod style homes date back a couple of hundred years. They’ve been optimized for space, but were not developed with energy efficiency in mind. But as long as you seal the air leaks and insulate well, a Cape can be warm and efficient. RELATED ARTICLES The illustration shows an attic kneewall in a Cape Cod style house. Capes are often insulated at the vertical wall and joist flats in the kneewalls. If the hot water pipes for the second floor heating are run through the kneewalls, they’ll be outside the thermal envelope. Erik North, the owner of Free Energy Maine, is an energy auditor and home performance specialist in Westbrook, Maine. He is also the author of the Energy Auditing Blog.last_img read more

Continue reading


Trump says protesting players in NFL should be fired

first_imgLATEST STORIES Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Read Next E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Activists raise their fists as they rally in support of NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick outside the offices of the National Football League on Park Avenue, August 23, 2017 in New York City. During the NFL season last year, Kaepernick caused controversy by kneeling during the National Anthem at games to protest racial oppression and police brutality. Kaepernick is currently a free agent and some critics and analysts claim NFL teams don’t want to sign him due to his public display of his political beliefs. AFP/GETTY IMAGES FILEHUNTSVILLE, Alabama — President Donald Trump has a suggestion for National Football League owners whose players decide to take a knee during the national anthem: fire them.And the president has a similar suggestion for fans of the sport: walk out of the stadium in protest.ADVERTISEMENT Delarmino, Chua settle for silvers Quarterback Colin Kaepernick started the trend last year when he played for the San Francisco 49ers. He hasn’t been signed by an NFL team this season.READ: NFL: Kaepernick’s controversial protest puts QB on cover of TimeFEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTrump’s hard-nosed reaction to protests by several athletes over treatment of blacks by police came Friday night during a freewheeling rally in Alabama. He says such players are disrespecting the flag and deserve to lose their jobs.Trump also bemoaned that football has become less violent. That view comes amid growing concerns over repeated head blows and a brain disease. BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president MOST READ Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes PLAY LIST 01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss01:04Trump attends World Series baseball game in Washington DC01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMClast_img read more

Continue reading


Eagles make it official, Nick Foles will get another start

first_imgBREAKING: Corrections officer shot dead in front of Bilibid “Those are obviously conversations we have to have,” Pederson said. “Those are tough decisions to make. I’ve said all along that Carson is our guy and if he’s cleared and 100 percent and ready to go, then we’ll address that at that time.”The Eagles have a chance because Foles again stepped in for Wentz and has been outstanding. Foles was the Super Bowl MVP 10 1/2 months ago after a spectacular performance against New England led Philadelphia to its first NFL title since 1960.He set a franchise-record with 471 yards passing against the Texans and tossed four touchdown passes. A week earlier, he led the 13 1/2-point underdog Eagles to a 30-23 victory on the road over the Los Angeles Rams.“He’s just an unbelievable player and an unbelievable person,” tight end Zach Ertz said. “His demeanor is so calm and he’s a really good player.”The Eagles are 8-2 with Foles the past two seasons, including the playoffs and a loss to Dallas in a meaningless game in Week 17 in which the starters only played one quarter.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES Going back to Foles’ first stint in Philadelphia, he’s 22-7 as a starter for the Eagles since going 1-5 his rookie year in 2012 on a 4-12 team that cost Andy Reid his job as coach.Notes: WR Mike Wallace was activated from injured reserve and CB Josh Hawkins was promoted from the practice squad. CBs Chandon Sullivan and De’Vante Bausby were released. Wallace hasn’t played since he broke his right fibula in Week 2.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Coach Doug Pederson announced Monday that Foles will remain under center, though it’s no surprise because Carson Wentz hasn’t been cleared to return from a back injury that has forced him to miss the last two games.“As he goes through this natural healing process and the rest and everything, our medical team will continue to evaluate him and we’ll see where he’s at,” Pederson said of Wentz. “Right now, Nick is the guy, and we’re going to finish at least this last game with Nick, and then we’ll evaluate next week again.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefThe defending Super Bowl champs will earn the NFC’s second wild-card spot if they beat the Redskins and the Vikings (8-6-1) lose at home to the Bears (11-4).Wentz will stay on the active roster so there’s a chance he could return if the Eagles stay alive. It would be tough to bench Foles, however, if he continues to play at a high level. PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Raiders win possible final game in Oakland, beat Broncoscenter_img View comments Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion MOST READ Philadelphia Eagles’ Nick Foles celebrates as he runs off the field after an NFL football game against the Houston Texans, Sunday, Dec. 23, 2018, in Philadelphia. Philadelphia won 32-30. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)PHILADELPHIA — Nick Foles will get another shot to lead the Philadelphia Eagles to the playoffs.Coming off a record-setting performance in a 32-30 comeback win over Houston, Foles will start when the Eagles (8-7) visit Washington (7-8) in a must-win game Sunday.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola?last_img read more

Continue reading


Sweat chooses safety above NFL stardom

Former Ohio State linebacker Andrew Sweat made national headlines when he walked away from an opportunity to play in the NFL on May 14, less than three weeks after signing with the Cleveland Browns as an undrafted free agent. He cited concussion symptoms as his reason to step away from the game. Sweat made the decision that playing professional football was not worth risking his long-term health. “I had three (concussions) at Ohio State,” Sweat told The Lantern. “I still was having symptoms – it was very scary. It’s not something that you experience often. You’re slowed down, you can’t think as well, it’s tough.” The link between football and head injuries has been reported and discussed often by the media and scientists who determine causes of head injuries while researching the risks and ways to prevent brain damage. Sweat said one of the symptoms he dealt with was depression. “Your mind’s just not right,” Sweat said. “I’ve never been depressed in my life but I mean, I was depressed in the spring because of my concussion. It’s definitely scary.” Dr. Paul Gubanich is a team physician for OSU Sports Medicine and an assistant clinical professor of internal medicine at OSU. Gubanich previously worked with professional football players as a member of the Cleveland Browns’ medical staff from 2004-2010. Gubanich told The Lantern that the link between athletes with concussions and depression is “something that we’re seeing more and more,” but head injuries are not necessarily the reason for their depression. “The truth is that we see (depression in athletes with concussions),” Gubanich said. “The underlying cause of that is not necessarily clear. The question becomes, is that actually a symptom of a concussion or is that a symptom of some other underlying process? The fact that they’re being treated for a chronic condition, that they’re removed from certain activities … We’re taking an athlete out of their normal environment – a young, healthy, vibrant person – and we’re changing their everyday activity.” A 2007 study in Medicine and Science in Sports & Exercise, an official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, investigated the link between concussions and depression. This study, which was led by Kevin Guskiewicz, the chair of University of North Carolina’s Department of Exercise and Sport Science, said he found that retired professional football players who had three or more concussions in their playing careers were three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than players who had no history of concussions. Sweat said he met with Dr. Michael “Micky” Collins, the clinical and executive director of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Sports Medicine Concussion Program, and was cleared to play. Due to patient privacy reasons, Collins declined The Lantern’s request for comment. Sweat, who is set to graduate from OSU this spring with a degree in marketing, said he will attend graduate school to pursue a career in law or medical sales. OSU athletic director Gene Smith, who told The Lantern in October 2010 that he suffered two concussions during his playing days, thinks Sweat is making the right decision. “I’m actually glad Andrew Sweat is going to law school,” Smith said during a Tuesday interview with The Lantern. “He’s a smart kid … he had a couple of tough concussions.” Sweat is only one of multiple players who have made the move in the past few weeks to give up their professional football careers due to concussion risks. Chad Diehl, a former Clemson fullback who signed with the Ravens as an undrafted free agent following the draft, retired on May 16. According to the Spartanburg Herald Journal, Diehl wrote on his Facebook page that he suffered another concussion in rookie mini-camp. “The doctor and I came into agreement that it would be in my best interest for my football career to go ahead and come to an end,” Diehl added. Eight-year NFL veteran guard Jacob Bell made the same decision earlier this month. Bell, who had signed with the Cincinnati Bengals as a free agent, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that his decision “came down to risk and reward.” Like Sweat and Diehl, Bell decided that the risk of long-term brain damage from concussion was not worth the reward of playing professional football. Gubanich said it is important for football players and other athletes in collision contact sports to understand the risks of their sport. “I wish (Sweat) the best,” Gubanich said. “I feel bad for these athletes … obviously some of them do know the risk, and I think our job is to help get the message out there and to try and help manage these situations to the best that we can, but there’s still a lot of awareness and education that needs to be done at multiple levels.” read more

Continue reading


Mens soccer prepares to take on No 7 Notre Dame

Shelby Lum / Photo editorFreshman Craig Zahour plays the ball up the field during a match against IPFW on Aug. 20, at Jesse Owen’s Memorial Stadium. OSU won, 2-0.The Ohio State men’s soccer team will finish exhibition matches when it travels to South Bend, Ind., to play No. 7 Notre Dame. Unranked OSU is currently 1-1 in exhibition this year after falling to West Virginia 1-0 and defeating Indiana University — Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) 2-0 at home.Like the Buckeyes, the Fighting Irish enter this game with an exhibition record of 1-1, after splitting back-to-back road games, losing to Creighton 1-0 and beating Drake 2-0.Notre Dame is coming off a season in which, at one point, it was the top-ranked team in the country, going 17-4-1 and finishing with the program’s best record since 1987. The team is hoping to continue that success despite the loss of two first-team All-Americans, including Big East Offensive Player of the Year forward Ryan Finley, who scored 21 of the Irish’s 52 goals.OSU will treat this game like a regular season one, but coach John Bluem will still be using the exhibition contest as a learning experience for his team.“They (Notre Dame) were the No. 1 team in the country for a while last year,” said Bluem, who is entering his 17thseason at the helm. “It’ll be a really good test to go on the road and play a team of that quality and again, it will expose some of the weaknesses of our team and the strengths of our team as well.”OSU junior midfielder Yianni Sarris, who assisted on both Buckeye goals against IPFW, said that the team will prepare for Notre Dame like it would for a regular season game, even though it knows it is still preseason.“You got to be ready for the season,” Sarris said. “The regular season is just around the corner and we’re going at it 100 percent.”Sarris will look to become a leader of this team after transferring from Florida Gulf Coast University before the 2012 season.The Buckeyes will begin regular season play when they face off against UNC-Wilmington and Northern Illinois in theWolstein Classic Aug. 30 and Sept. 1 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

Continue reading