Beat writers predict No. 8 Syracuse’s matchup with No. 12 Notre Dame

first_imgNo. 8 Syracuse (5-2, 1-1 Atlantic Coast), in the top-10 for the first time this year, plays it’s first road game of the season Saturday against No. 12 Notre Dame (4-3, 0-1). The Orange are coming off a come-from-behind win over then-No. 2 Duke and look to extend its winning streak to four.Here’s what the beat writers expect for the outcome of the game.Andrew Graham (5-2)The state of IndianaSyracuse 13, Notre Dame 10I’m confident that Syracuse is better than Notre Dame, but I just don’t know how much so. On paper, SU has the offense to crack the Fighting Irish’s stout defense and get to goalie Matt Schmidt and the defense necessary to stymie the likes of Brendan Gleason and Bryan Costabile. Syracuse’s two biggest advantages in this matchup are the two most specialized positions: goalie and faceoff specialist. At the faceoff X, Jakob Phaup is one of the best in the country, winning 66 percent of draws he takes. UND’s Charles Leonard is comparable (55.4 percent) but not close. In net, Drake Porter’s saving more than half the shots he faces while Schmidt is saving less. Ultimately, Syracuse gets this one done, hopefully with no overtime, and moves closer to getting a Thursday bye in the ACC tournament.Michael McCleary (5-2)Dismiss me, I’m IrishSyracuse 14, Notre Dame 10AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHere’s how I think this will go: Notre Dame will score the first three goals of the match, and every one of us will immediately say, “Darn. Was it a good idea to count on Syracuse to stay hot?” But it might happen in the second, it might happen in the third, it might happen in the fourth — Syracuse is going to come back, it’s going to push away, and it’s going to jump ahead. The Orange all said last week that they need to do something about the slow starts they’ve been having. While it won’t complain about a come-from-behind win over then-No. 2 Duke, SU doesn’t want to fall behind early in the game. This may be the game where Syracuse leads the entire time. It doesn’t matter, though. The Orange will end this game with the higher score.Nick Alvarez (3-4)Parks and wrecked Syracuse 15, Notre Dame 9 I should probably start picking Syracuse. right? Whatever preseason expectations you had for this team probably lurched forward after last Sunday’s upset over then-No. 2 Duke. The Orange are dangerous because they’ve shown that a comeback can overcome any talent disparity. It’s happened three weekends in a row. This Saturday, though, SU is going to jump ahead early and control the game. Think the course-correcting win against Albany. Tyson Bomberry and Nick Mellen have locked in and Notre Dame can’t rely on the “big-little” strategy that most teams have tried against Syracuse since the Virginia game one month ago. Stephen Rehfuss is trending upward and Brendan Curry played hero-ball a week ago. Give me the Orange in an easy showcase. Comments Published on March 30, 2019 at 11:19 am Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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An underappreciated part to the Sharks’ three-game win streak

first_imgSAN JOSE — As much as the return of Evander Kane and the signing of Patrick Marleau have helped the Sharks turn things around after one of the worst starts in franchise history, their record might look a lot different now if it wasn’t for their penalty kill.The Sharks had to kill a third period penalty to protect a one-goal lead in their Oct. 10 game against Chicago, scored shorthanded and killed two more third period penalties in their two-goal win over Calgary on Sunday, then killed four …last_img read more

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Street Child Cup kicks off in SA

first_imgMore than 70 teenagers from variouscountries are gathered in Durban toplay football. A girl playing football in the streets ofManagua, Nicaragua’s capital.(Images: Street Child World Cup)MEDIA CONTACTS• Joe HewittMedia LiaisonStreet Child World [email protected]• Umthombo+27 31 337 [email protected] ARTICLES• Boost for school football• Nestlé nurtures future footballers• SA’s children get football fever• Football for Hope to unite SABongani NkosiMore than 70 homeless teenagers from across the world have been given a chance to flex their football skills in Durban, South Africa, in the inaugural Deloitte Street Child World Cup.The week-long tournament, which kicked off at the Durban University of Technology on 15 March, features a series of seven-a-side indoor matches between street children from South Africa, Tanzania, Nicaragua, Brazil, Ukraine, India, Vietnam, the UK and Philippines.The teams are mixed, with boys and girls playing together, and the winning squad will take home an impressive trophy.Opening group stage matches have already created fireworks: in one game the South African team, represented by the Umthombo Football Club, beat Ukraine 4-1, while the skilful Brazilians were defeated by the indefatigable Tanzanian squad 2-0 in another.The tournament was initiated by UK human rights organisation Amos Trust. Umthombo, an NGO working with street children in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, is facilitating it.Events like these are a good way to reach out to children living on the streets, said Umthombo CEO Tom Hewitt. “The tournament is fantastic. It celebrates the potential of street children.”Hewitt has been impressed by the participants’ talent so far. “Nicaragua is not known for football, but those children playing in the competition are quite incredible,” Hewitt said. “The Brazilian team is also fantastic … people are excited for it.”The youngsters are thrilled to be taking part in such a competition, he added. They received a warm welcome when they arrived in Durban, with locals staging a traditional Zulu-style carnival for them.The Street Child World Cup is meant to, among other things, create a platform for the youngsters to share experiences of their respective countries, said Joe Hewitt, the tournament’s head of media.SA ideal host for first CupThe plan is to hold future street child games in countries hosting major sporting events, such as world cups and the Olympics. It’s fitting that the inaugural tournament is staged in South Africa in 2010 to coincide with the Fifa World Cup here.“The Fifa World Cup is something that should be for all. These children should be involved in it in some way,” said Joe Hewitt. They should be given a special opportunity to be involved as flag bearers and ball crew members, he added.“The Deloitte Street Child World Cup demonstrates the tremendous potential of every single child, and especially street children, who are so often treated as less than human,” said Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu in a statement. “I am proud that the first ever Street Child World Cup will take place in South Africa …”Tutu is one of a number of influential personalities who have endorsed the Cup. Others include AC Milan and England midfielder David Beckham, Bafana Bafana captain Aaron Mokoena, Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson, UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown and Filipino professional boxer Manny Pacquiao.“I am delighted that the first Street Child World Cup will take place in South Africa where I know there is a huge passion for football. No child should have to live on the streets and I fully endorse this campaign giving street children a voice to claim their rights,” said Ferguson, who has visited South Africa a number of times with his team to play Soweto giants Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates in the annual Vodacom Challenge tournament.Taking children off Durban’s streets Umthombo, formerly known as the Durban Street Team, has been working on the streets of the coastal city since 1998. The organisation runs various projects to help homeless children – these include a mobile health clinic, mentoring schemes and a community reintegration programme.The organisation does not believe in putting street children in institutions, but rather tries to reunite them with their families. Tom Hewitt said it’s been encouraging to note the growing number of children who have been returned to their homes.“There are fewer kids on the streets of Durban this year compared to last year,” he said. “The children are able to reintegrate into family life.”The Street Child World Cup helps remind the public that there are homeless youngsters across the world, not just in South Africa, Joe Hewitt said. “It shows that this is a global problem. There are countries bigger than South Africa that still have the problem.”This year’s participants will also attend the Street Child World Cup Indaba in Durban from 20 to 22 March. With themes such as home, safety and health, the youngsters will shares stories and discuss future aspirations with each other.last_img read more

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Al Jazeera Takes a Stab at Social News

first_imgYou remember those social news shows and segments that debuted over the last couple of years, right? Right? I hope you do because I don’t, and neither do any of the other writers here. Al Jazeera is hoping to buck that trend with “The Stream.” The Stream draws for its stories from the flow of social media in the Middle East, a flow that’s grown positively torrential over the last six months. independent participants on Twitter and Facebook have frequently outpaced even the most competent and committed reporters. And the best of them have in turn contributed to the stream. Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… curt hopkins Tags:#New Media#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Hosts Derrick Ashong and Ahmed Shihab-Eldin turned their studios, a thunderdome of screens, into a hellbroth of feeds and videos for the 30-minute show’s online beta premiere. Ashong described it as a “social media community with its own daily TV program.” The broadcast debut is in two weeks.The beta premiere looked at Mexicans using social media to counter drug violence, a Yemeni blogger’s return home and Indian anti-corruption efforts. “I thought it was great,” said the Berkman Center‘s Jillian York, one of the guests on the premiere. “It was a bit unexpected: I thought I’d be talking about the social media aspects of the stories they sent me, but instead I was asked about the actual bits.”Two things struck me. First, it was professional. The people directing and curating the conversation were competent and agile. Second, the social media was a series of veins to be mined and lines along which communication ran, not ornamentation or gimmick.If anyone is going to do something like this right, Al Jazeera, which has a good track record of real social media innovation, is a likely candidate. It will be interesting to watch how it grows. Unsurprisingly, the show has a Twitter feed and a Facebook page, both of which are points of pretty vital conversation. The Stream uses Storify to curate information relating to a story. I admit I’ve yet to get my head around the utility of this tool as a story-telling medium, though I seem to be odd man out on this. Other sources: Lost Remote A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…last_img read more

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Mechanical Ventilation for Affordable Existing Housing

first_imgEveryone needs fresh air; it’s just hard to figure out how much we need when we are indoors. Enterprise Community Partners’ (ECP) Green Single Family Rehab Specs (2008) requires a ventilation system to meet ASHRAE 62.2 for “substantial rehabilitation” (essentially gut rehabs) and then cites a source for the ASHRAE standard and a source reviewing types of residential ventilation systems. Quite a lot to digest here so let’s break it down.What is ASHRAE 62.2?ASHRAE is the professional organization for HVAC engineers and they spent a heck of a lot of time and effort (and pain) hammering out what they thought were reasonable and effective ventilation requirements for homes. This is tricky for homes because volume of space, number of occupants, and contaminant loads (moisture, odors, air-borne chemicals, etc) vary quite widely from home to home. It’s also tricky because you can ventilate too little and compromise occupant health or ventilate too much and waste energy and money. The rate of ventilation in ASHRAE 62.2 turns out to be about that of a typical bath exhaust fan for a 2000 square foot home. For more background, see the GBA Green Basics section on Ventilation Choices.How tight does a home have to be to require mechanical ventilation?All homes leak air: we open and close doors and windows, we turn on spot exhaust fans in the kitchen and baths, we run devices that pull air through the home (clothes dryers, fireplaces, water heaters and furnaces with open flues). How do we know when we have made a home, particularly an older existing home, air tight enough to require whole-house mechanical ventilation? ASHRAE 62.2 states that any home tighter than 0.35 air changes per hour needs a dedicated, systematic ventilation approach (that means approximately all the air in a home being replaced every 3 hours). That is pretty much why the ECP green rehab specs for full gut jobs require ASHRAE 62.2 compliance; by the time you get done the specs for air sealing and insulating, you will have tightened up the home enough so that you need to introduce a mechanical ventilation system.What systems make the most sense for affordable housing renovation?GBA editor Martin Holladay has a great blog on types of ventilation systems. The two most affordable yet effective ventilation systems are exhaust-only and central fan-integrated supply.Exhaust-only ventilationThis system can be as simple as an Energy Star bath exhaust fan installed to run at the appropriate rate either all the time or at a higher rate intermittently on a schedule to satisfy ASHRAE 62.2 (see Figure 1, although this is a more complex exhaust-only system). The advantages to exhaust-only systems are: low first and installed cost, and appropriate in all climates and types of homes. The cost chart from the recommended BSC ventilation article lists the installed cost for a single-point exhaust system as $300 (2005). The retrofit installation portion of the total cost is, of course, affected by how easy it is to install the fan and how long or complicated the duct runs are.The major disadvantage to this system is distribution; with only one point of draw it is easy to over-ventilate one space and under-ventilate others. As a result, exhaust-only systems work best in smaller homes with open floor plans. A key to this system’s effectiveness is quality installation; don’t pay for a good fan and then get a lousy installation with loose and lengthy ducts with lots of twists and turns. The straighter and shorter the duct runs, the better.Some builders add make-up air inlets to their exhaust-only ventilation systems. This means that the air pulled into the home to supply the exhaust comes from these inlets rather than from sundry cracks and random air leaks. Many building scientists argue that how much and which direction these inlets permit air flow is dependent on forces (such as wind) that can make them just as unpredictable in their operation as random cracks. If you do use air inlets, make sure you locate them away from sources of lousy air.Central-fan integrated supply (CFIS) ventilationThis system runs an intake duct to the return plenum or trunk of your forced-air system and then uses the blower fan to intermittently pull in outside air per ASHRAE 62.2 requirements (see Figure 2). The advantages to this system are: low first and installed cost, appropriate for all climates, and excellent distribution (since the forced air duct system mixes the fresh air with all the other air it is moving about the house). The same BSC ventilation cost chart lists the CFIS installed cost at about $300 as well. Again, the cost for retrofit installation of this system depends on just how easy it is to add a duct running from a good exterior wall location to the return plenum or return trunk.The disadvantages to this system are: it is really only feasible in homes with central forced-air systems and its operating costs over a year can be much higher than other systems. The higher operating cost is because a large and often energy inefficient central air handler must run to pull in and distribute the outside air. Of course, the more your air handler is running anyway to distribute cooled or heated air, the less the air handler is running JUST to do ventilation. So, the marginal operating costs of the CFIS system can vary by climate.last_img read more

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On College Campuses, Signs of Progress on Renewable Energy

first_img RELATED ARTICLES Progress at smaller schoolsHampshire College is completing a 19-acre solar array, as it seeks to produce all its power from renewables. Managing growth, offsetting transportation emissions, and renovating buildings is often easier for private schools, which contend with less red tape and have smaller carbon footprints. Later this year, Hampshire College, in Massachusetts, will complete construction on a 19-acre solar array, the focal point of the college’s plan to generate all of its electricity from on-site renewables. Colby College in Maine, Green Mountain College and Middlebury in Vermont, and Oberlin College — none of which have a student population larger than 3,000 — all perch within the Sierra Club’s top 20.Atop the rankings sits College of the Atlantic, a tiny liberal arts college in Maine whose student body counts just 350 undergraduates — fewer than some public schools cram into a single Biology 101 lecture hall. In 2007, College of the Atlantic became the country’s first carbon-neutral school, an objective it achieved primarily by investing in offsets provided by a traffic light optimization project in Portland, Oregon.Although the offsets cost just $22,000, the purchase wasn’t universally popular — some students argued that the college should concentrate on improving on-campus efficiency and fostering Maine’s renewable energy industry.Today, College of the Atlantic no longer buys offsets, but it gets more than 40% of its energy from wind farms, community solar projects, local wood pellets, and other fossil-fuel-free sources. The college now plans to go carbon-free by 2050 — a target that Anna Demeo, director of energy education and management, says it’s on track to beat.“We had to lose the title of carbon neutrality,” Demeo says. “But in the end that title wasn’t as important as teaching students from the ground-up how to participate in local renewable energy economies.” U.S. Colleges Take ‘Climate-Neutral’ PledgeNet-Zero Design Wins Carbon Competition ‘All New Construction and Retrofits Must Be Carbon-Neutral’ Careful Air Sealing Trims Energy Use at New College DormsUnity College’s TerraHaus Aims for PassivhausNet-Zero Cities Aren’t Possible, You Say? Public schools make big gainsNot every campus can exploit the relentless Arizona sun, of course; nonetheless, university sustainability is moving further into the mainstream with every passing year. In 2007, the first installment of the Sierra Club’s rankings was dominated by small private colleges known for their progressive bent, like Oberlin in Ohio and Vermont’s Middlebury.Only two of the top 10 schools — the University of California system and Pennsylvania State University — were public institutions. By contrast, half of this year’s top 10 is composed of public schools, including major institutions like Arizona State and the University of Connecticut. The Climate Leadership Network, a coalition of more than 650 schools that have vowed to achieve carbon neutrality on self-determined timetables, counts institutions such as Montana State, Mississippi State, and the University of Washington among its members.The trend’s ramifications are potentially transformative. “Nationwide, there are around 20 million students on university campuses, and 5 million faculty and staff,” says Dovev Levine, assistant dean of the Graduate School at the University of New Hampshire, which in 2009 began piping in processed methane from a nearby landfill to run its cogeneration plant. “That’s not an insignificant slice of the American public.” Many experts say universities could be doing far more to adopt renewable energy technologies. State edicts also can helpIn some cases, being a public institution can be a blessing in disguise. State regulations and policies designed to cut costs or achieve climate goals may force public campuses to clean up their acts. In Massachusetts, a 2007 executive order directing state buildings to reduce their environmental impact led the University of Massachusetts system to slash its greenhouse gas emissions by 17%.Those gains aren’t unique to the Bay State: Between 2007 and 2014, private institutions reduced their energy consumption by just 2%, while public universities sliced consumption by 5%.The imperative to save money is also a powerful motivator. At Colorado State, the volatility of natural gas prices convinced administrators to embrace comparatively stable solar power. At Ohio State, the declining cost of wind power has guided renewable purchases. “We locked in a long-term price for 20 years,” says Bartter, of Ohio State. “While wind is a bit more expensive right now, I bet it’ll be cheaper in 10 years than the rest of the power we’re buying.”Universities have also sought to integrate new academic research into facilities operations. At Portland State University in Oregon, a recently launched Living Lab initiative connects student research projects with campus sustainability programs, such as waste reduction efforts. Ohio State’s researchers use wind turbines to study rotor design, and College of the Atlantic students install community solar panels. And in Tempe, Darosa hopes to deploy carbon-capture processes being developed by Arizona State faculty to further slash the university’s footprint.“We want to be an exemplar for our students, for the community, and for other institutions,” Darosa says. “What could be a better use for a university than to develop cutting-edge technology and apply it in a practical way on campus?” Urban campuses often buy renewable powerFor campuses with ample open space, like CSU’s Foothills, installing renewable energy capacity is sometimes feasible. Urban campuses, however, often have little recourse but to purchase power from outside sources.That’s the route taken by Ohio State University, which in 2012 bought 50 MW from a privately owned off-site wind farm — enough capacity to meet 21% of the energy needs of its main campus in Columbus. Now Ohio State is contemplating leasing its energy infrastructure, such as its electricity distribution systems and geothermal wells, to a private company, which would manage the campus for improved efficiency and sustainability.Contractors install solar panels at Colorado State University. (Photo: Colorado State University]“Universities all over the country are watching us right now, and they’re thinking, ‘If that works for them, maybe we’ll dip our toes in that water too,’” says Kate Bartter, director of Ohio State’s office of energy and environment.Other campuses have initiated their own experiments. In 2015, Yale University launched a pilot project to experiment with different ways of imposing an internal carbon charge and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The initiative divides 20 campus buildings into four groups to test a spectrum of carbon-pricing schemes.One model has buildings compete for budgetary rebates; another gives them rebates when they hit certain carbon reduction targets; a third has buildings pay monthly carbon charges and apply a portion of year-end rebates to energy-saving projects; and the final model simply provides buildings with detailed information about their energy consumption. The experiment is designed not only to cut campus energy use, but also to help other institutions gauge which policies are most effective in slashing emissions. Universities could be doing moreYet despite recent advances at places like Arizona State, many experts say that universities could be doing far more to adopt renewable energy technologies. According to an analysis conducted by the University of New Hampshire and Sightlines, a facilities management firm, total campus emissions declined by 5% between 2010 and 2013. Yet national carbon emissions fell by 3.5% during the same period, a decline mostly attributable to economic recession and the replacement of coal with natural gas.In spite of all their sustainability pledges and carbon neutrality goals, U.S. universities have scarcely made more progress than the rest of the country, and most remain almost entirely dependent on the electricity grid.“Campuses are doing a lot, but could still utilize more renewable energy to meet their needs,” says Levine, who co-authored the analysis. “I’d like to see universities become more self-sufficient.”As Levine points out, higher education faces the same fundamental challenge as the planet at large: how to cut emissions in spite of burgeoning population and development. From 2007 to 2014, campuses slashed energy consumption per square foot by 2%, and emissions per square foot by 13%. Those efficiency gains, however, were undermined by growth: During the same period, built space on American campuses grew by 10%, and enrollment by 7%. The upshot is that nearly as many universities have watched their emissions spike in the last decade as have seen them fall.One campus that has made ample progress is Colorado State University, a land grant university with more than 33,000 students. Colorado State is located in Fort Collins, where an abundance of cheap coal-fired power long prevented renewable energy from taking root. Beginning in 2009, however, a series of state and utility incentives encouraged Colorado State to install 6,600 kW of solar electricity on two campuses, including a 5.3-megawatt ground-mounted system that blankets 30 acres of its Foothills Campus on the western edge of Fort Collins.Carol Dollard, Colorado State’s energy engineer, says the university is considering another 10 MW, with the solar panels perhaps serving as shade for grazing sheep. “In arid Colorado, grass grows better underneath panels, so it could be a great synergy,” she says.Yet those additional panels would likely take a while to affect the university’s climate goals. Colorado State doesn’t actually own its larger solar systems; instead, those panels are owned and installed by renewable energy companies, which sell clean-energy credits to the municipal utility. (The university receives payments for leasing out its lands and rooftops, and has the option to buy the panels after 20 years.)The smaller solar arrays the university does own, says Dollard, provide just 3% to 4% of the campus’s power. The upshot is that reaching carbon neutrality by the university’s self-determined deadline of 2050 will require developing different energy sources, perhaps including wind farms on other CSU campuses. “You could cover every roof on campus with solar, and you still wouldn’t get there,” Dollard acknowledges. Transportation is a stumbling blockAs Bartter of Ohio State readily admits, one of her university’s greatest carbon challenges has nothing to do with on-campus infrastructure — instead, it’s alleviating the climate impacts of transportation. At many institutions, commuting to campus represents a significant source of emissions. Students and faculty also rack up countless miles attending trips and conferences, leading one group of academics to launch a petition calling on academia to reduce its collective flying.Although Arizona State’s campus intends to become carbon-neutral by 2025, it will take the university another decade to compensate for transportation. “You can’t force your employees to live next to campus and not drive,” Darosa points out. Ben Goldfarb is a freelance environmental journalist based in New Haven, Conn. This post originally appeared at Yale Environment 360. By BEN GOLDFARBThe soul of Arizona State University is Memorial Union, a hulking brick-and-glass community center that opens onto a sprawling pedestrian mall. Although the building sits at the heart of campus, its outdoor plaza was once virtually uninhabitable for four months each year, when summer temperatures in scorching Tempe often hover over 100 degrees.So in 2014, the university — Arizona’s leading energy consumer — completed construction on a PowerParasol, a 25-foot-tall shade canopy composed of 1,380 photovoltaic panels capable of producing 397 kilowatts of electricity.“These solar systems have transformed the area,” says Gerry Darosa, director of energy innovations at Arizona State. “You’ll see people singing, talking, eating — it’s become a vibrant social gathering place.”The Memorial Union’s PowerParasol is just one installation within Arizona State’s expansive network of 88 solar systems, which now produces 41,000 megawatt hours annually — enough to power nearly 4,000 average U.S. homes. Arizona State’s solar capacity stands second among American universities, behind only rival University of Arizona, and it’s about to grow further: The state’s largest electric utility is building an off-site facility that will provide the campus with another 65,000 megawatt hours per year, knocking 10% from its carbon footprint.That will go a long way toward helping Arizona State create a carbon-neutral campus by 2025, a target it aims to reach not only by expanding its solar capacity, but also by improving its refrigeration and waste management practices, making its buildings more efficient, and purchasing carbon offsets. The university’s reliance on solar power is a major reason why the Sun Devils have risen to sixth place in the Sierra Club’s 2016 campus sustainability rankings, which score schools on their commitment to renewable energy and greenhouse gas reduction along with other factors like purchasing local food and composting waste. “Solar is pretty much ubiquitous around here — it’s hard to walk outside somewhere and not see panels,” Darosa says.last_img read more

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Cross-Platform Scaling: The Way Forward for Businesses on Blockchain

first_imgRuben is a blockchain security consultant currently living in New York City. He helps organizations fundamentally redesign experiences to create new sources of value also digitally reinventing company’s operations for greater efficiency. Tags:#Blockchain#the blockchain Related Posts Over the past 18 months, we have witnessed a significant shift in the state of the financial markets. Cryptocurrencies, once a niche fascination, have exploded in value. At the start of 2017, digital currencies held collective market cap of less than a $20 billion. They entered 2018 with a head-turning $850 billion market cap – one of the most impressive year-over-year expansions we’ve ever witnessed. Experts such as Tim Draper, the billionaire investor, have boldly predicted that the price of Bitcoin will soar to $250,000 in four years. Meanwhile, crypto startups are gaining traction like never before. However, while cryptocurrencies and their impressive prices attract most of the mainstream headlines, there is a growing awareness from industry experts and central governments that its underlying technology, the blockchain, is the foundation and biggest game changer of all.The Value of Blockchain As The New York Times recently wrote, “The Bitcoin bubble may ultimately turn out to be a distraction from the true significance of the blockchain.”In January, JP Morgan Chase CEO, Jamie Dimon, offered what was, for him, high praise of the technology when he described it as “real.” Putting it more romantically, Mckinsey and Co. describe the blockchain as the technology which could “revolutionize the world economy.”On March 9th, the president of China’s central bank, Zhou Xiaochuan, supported blockchain technology in his comments to the National People’s Congress. They closely aligned with statements from U.S. officials at the Securities and Exchange Commission.In an official statement on cryptocurrency and blockchain, SEC Chairman Jay Clayton noted, “The technology on which cryptocurrencies and ICOs are based may prove to be disruptive, transformative and efficiency enhancing. I am confident that developers in fintech will help facilitate capital formation and provide promising investment opportunities for institutional and Main Street investors alike.”That’s not to say that blockchain technology is ready to disrupt the world right now. It’s still a relatively new technology which requires continued development and maturation to be presentable as a commercial enterprise solution. For instance, research and consulting firm Deloitte, identified blockchain connectivity as a necessary and essential tech trend for this year. In a detailed report on the issue, Deloitte wrote, “With the proliferation of platforms and protocols in the marketplace today, no single solution has emerged as the clear winner.”In short, while blockchain technology is extremely competent, its disparate and disconnected networks don’t make for easy enterprise solutions just yet. Fortunately, progress is being made.Enabling Blockchain’s to Communicate With Each OtherSeveral initiatives are already underway to connect blockchains or adapt their functionality for businesses. Qtum, a Singapore-based blockchain initiative, connects Ethereum’s smart contracts and Bitcoin’s blockchain, bringing together the two most prominent blockchain technologies available today.Bitcoin, the preeminent and most valuable cryptocurrency, is the leading candidate for broad implementation, and Ethereum is a long-time favorite of enterprise initiatives.Using a proof-of-stake verification method, Qtum creates a system that’s adaptable and usable for broad business solutions. Because Qtum offers ready-made tools, companies can use its platform to integrate blockchain protocols, smart contracts and other features into their current business workflow. As a platform which doesn’t require programming skills, Qtum is an enterprise-level blockchain platform that allows for effective workflows and connectivity.With job postings in the cryptocurrency space on the rise, a lack of blockchain developers to fill these roles could prove to be a significant holdup for blockchain advancement and proliferation. Platforms like Qtum could be a boon to the industry.Another emerging platform is the ‘Overledger’ platform by Quant. It’s positioning itself as the ‘blockchain operating system of the future’ and is the first blockchain operating system facilitating the development of multi-chain applications. First and foremost, the platform aims to facilitate human-to-human and machine-to-machine trust, enabling them to transact with one another safely and securely. In addition, the Overledger platform plans to address many of the primary limitations of current blockchain technology that are limiting its true potential. One more example of this is the Hyperledger Quilt which is one of the Hyperledger projects hosted by The Linux Foundation. It is a Java implementation of the Interledger protocol (a protocol for making transactions across ledgers). The platform acts as a business blockchain tool that offers interoperability between ledger systems The purpose of the platform is to act as a connected ledger that makes it easier, cheaper, and faster to transfer value to users on different ledgers or networks.Other platforms like TenX are striving to connect blockchains by making the value derived from the various blockchains accessible on other chains as well. TenX uses a debit card payment system to make blockchain assets instantly spendable. By making things like digital currency or decentralized rewards more usable, TenX is improving the blockchain’s ability to function across different platforms.Enterprise integration will require close integration and reliable communication between the best and most capable blockchains.Changing the World With Blockchain The blockchain has broad use-cases for nearly every industry. In the finance industry, the blockchain provides a more secure, stable, and speedy payment system that can radically upend the current operation models. Selected as the ‘Global Bank of the Year’ in 2017, Santander recently launched an international payment service based on Ripple’s xCurrent.The opportunities don’t end there. From supply chain management to e-commerce, the possibilities are seemingly endless. In South Korea, you can now use cryptocurrency as a currency to buy products in over 6,000 stores. Perhaps even more excitingly is the news that Newegg Inc, the e-commerce website that is currently rivaling Amazon for sales in the technical equipment and electronics industry, has recently expanded its payment options to accept Bitcoin from its customers in Canada.However, the lack of communication between different blockchains still acts as a bottleneck that is slowing the growth of the industry. For significant progress to be made that allows blockchain technology to reach its full potential, the many different blockchains will need to easily be able to  connect to and communicate with one another.This is a high priority development, and platforms are already working to make it a reality. Qtum is bringing together the two most prominent blockchains, Bitcoin and Ethereum, while TenX is making blockchain assets usable in the real world. It’s a step in the right direction, and it’s the process that will result in the blockchain achieving its real value proposition.Revolutionizing the entire world economy would change the world as we know it. And the most exciting part is, blockchains could actually pull this off.  But first of all, they will need to be able to communicate and connect. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Blockchain – Impending Revolution in Glob… Follow the Puck Reuben Jackson What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …last_img read more

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QUEENSLAND JUNIOR STATE CUP SET FOR ACTION

first_imgA record 129 teams will converge on the Sunshine Coast for the 2006 Queensland Junior State Cup.The biggest tournament on the Touch Football Queensland calendar will be held at the Glasshouse Mountains Sports Club, Tourist Drive, Glasshouse Mountains from 7 – 9 July.The three-day tournament will showcase the State’s best junior teams and will feature over 1500 players, 200 officials, and 80 referees.The Junior State Cup contested in school holiday time at the idyllic Coastal location creates a great carnival atmosphere and is a regular pilgrimage for the Queensland Touch community.In its eleventh year of existence, the tournament continues to increase in participant numbers and popularity, with over 5000 spectators expected tohead to the top of the mountain to view the non-stop action from the 313 tournament games. Brisbane Metropolitan Touch Association, winner of six out of eight divisions in 2005, are again expected to dominate the tournament.Gold Coast, Redlands, and Toowoomba Touch Associations have tuned up for the TFA Queensland Junior State Cup by contesting the Delfin Junior Tri-Series and will provide stiff opposition to the reigning champions.Nominations have been received from all over Queensland with Caboolture, Chinchilla, Rockhampton, Bundaberg, Noosa, Hervey Bay, and Dalby providing the most teams across divisions in the Boys and Girls competition in age groups from Under 11 through to Under 17.An amazing 34 teams have nominated for the respective Boys (18) and Girls (16) 11Years divisions, highlighting the popularity of the sport with our youngest age group of representative players across the State.A deserving junior champion in the respective Boys and Girls17 years divisions will receive the prestigious Scott Notley (Boys) or Kerry Norman (Girls) medal for outstanding performance, service, sportsmanship, and dedication to their affiliate and the sport.Touch Football Queensland has organized some great promotions and activities for participants during the 3 days including an All Star Mixed game featuring Australian Youth Development squad members against a selection of players from the State Cup Under 17 Girls and Boys divisions. A trade display, skill challenges, sporting pulse workshops, and other development resources will be available for affiliate education during the tournament. The Touch Football Queensland Coaching Management Team (CMT) and Referee Management Team (RMT) will provide coaching and assessments for interested technical personnel and some great new merchandise will be available for the event.The Junior Elite Talent Squad (JETS) under the watchful eye of RMT Youth Portfolio Manager Rob Ward and JETS Portfolio Director Glen Richardson will also be in action, showing Queensland’s junior talent also extends to the refereeing ranks.Among the ten elite junior referees participating are three North Queenslanders making the flight down to gain valuable advice and experience from some of Queensland’s best referees.TFA and TFQ staff will be on hand to deliver all aspects of tournament Administration and to assist in the delivery of a very successful and enjoyable 2006 Junior State Cup for all.All information about the tournament, including relevant FORMS, DRAWS and the MANAGER’S KIT can be obtained in the next 24 hours by going to www.sportingpulse.com.au selecting “Touch” and “Queensland.”Keep an eye on the Junior State Cup tournament web site for further news, stories, and information in the lead-up and throughout the event, including up to date results and all the latest news fresh from the fields.Tournament control AKA the “Glass Elevator” will keep you posted on all you need to know about the 2006 Touch Football Australia Queensland Junior State Cup.last_img read more

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2012 Sportscover Sponsorship Fund Grants

first_imgApplications for the 2012 Sportscover Sponsorship Fund (SSF) are now open, with 20 grants to be awarded to clubs and associations across a broad cross-section of sports. The 20 grants, worth US$750 each, will be awarded to a variety of amateur sports clubs, associations and people who are striving to achieve sporting greatness in their community.Sportscover’s desire to assist community sports led to the creation of the SSF,  and over the last few years, the SSF has donated over $70,000 in grants to grass-roots sporting clubs and associations.The first round is now closed, however the second round of grants, in which seven grants will be awarded, will run from the 1st August – 15th September, and the third round of grants seeing six awarded will be open from the 1st October – 15th November.To view eligibility criteria please visit the following link:§  http://www.sportscover.com/sp_criteria.asp The application form can be found at:§  http://www.sportscover.com/ssf/ For more information on the SSF, please visit the Sportscover website by following the link below:http://www.sportscover.com/supporting-sport.asp?id=1610Related Links2012 SSF Grantslast_img read more

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