Attorney analyzes application of Constitution

first_imgTo celebrate Constitution Day on Tuesday, Saint Mary’s welcomed attorney William Wilson to campus to discuss the notion of constitutionality. The lecture, titled “The Modern Woman’s Guide to the U.S. Constitution,” commemorated the United States Constitution on its 226th anniversary and interpreted it in a modern-day legal context.   Wilson, who works at the firm Anderson, Agostino and Keller, said he specializes in constitutional issues regarding the First Amendment, the Commerce Clause and the Due Process Clause. Many people are unsure what it means for a law to be constitutional or unconstitutional, and others call any legislation they don’t agree with unconstitutional, Wilson said. “Frequently, what happens is you’ll see a news story that says ‘the Supreme Court or some other court has decided that a law or a policy of the government is unconstitutional,” Wilson said. “And great, but what does that mean? … Sometimes we use ‘that’s unconstitutional’ as kind of a derogatory jab at something that we don’t like, and that has nothing to do with law.” Before discussing modern application of the Constitution, Wilson said it is important to recognize the importance of the document’s first three articles. These articles establish the three branches of the United States government and lie at the core of governmental structure. Wilson used the Affordable Care Act to exemplify how to apply the Constitution to modern times. He said the Act is constitutional despite concerns about its effects. Wilson said the Affordable Care Act “seems to fly in the face of what we’ve been brought up to believe,” and appears to “challenge our nation’s democratic values and freedoms.” But the Constitution gives Congress the power to impose taxes, which is what the Affordable Care Act essentially does. “It says, if you don’t have health insurance, then you will pay a tax,” Wilson said. Wilson cited Chief Justice John Roberts on the topic of the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the Affordable Care Act. “‘Our task is not to decide whether the Affordable Care Act represents wise policy. Our job is to decide whether it’s constitutional. … History will tell us whether it was wise,” Wilson said, quoting Roberts. Wilson said it is important that citizens recognize the proper role of the courts and the real meaning of constitutionality. “We, as citizens, need to remember that the federal courts and even the state courts are not places where we can just go and say ‘that’s such a lousy idea, you ought to strike it down, it’s unconstitutional,’” Wilson said. “There is no part of our Constitution that says ‘thou shall not pass stupid legislation.’” Wilson also said a continual adherence to the Constitution has enabled our nation and government to remain stable. He said Syria, Egypt, Northern Ireland and other conflict-ridden regions exemplify the problems and instability the United States has avoided. Even in times of controversy, such as the 2000 presidential election, the United States government has come out virtually unscathed, Wilson said. The Supreme Court’s deciding the election after ballot issues occurred in Florida could have spurred constitutional crisis. “We could have had a real constitutional crisis if [then-presidential candidate] Al Gore had said ‘I don’t accept the Supreme Court ruling,’” Wilson said. “Al Gore said, ‘I disagree with the court’s decision, but it’s the court, and they’re the last word.’”  Wilson said judges and the courts are vital because someone needs to have the final say on these matters, no matter how minor the particular case appears to be. “Somebody needs to be the head referee on the field,” he said. “Our Constitution means something because we as a society have decided and accepted that sometimes we have to tolerate decisions that we don’t like.”last_img read more

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SMC Love Your Body Week inspires true beauty

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the third installment in a five-part series exploring the events and discussions of Saint Mary’s Love Your Body Week, which aims to foster self-confidence and positive body images. Love Your Body Week at Saint Mary’s continued Tuesday night with yoga and frozen yogurt in Angela athletic facility, followed by a discussion titled, “True Beauty: A Definition from God” in Vander Vennet theater.Junior Sam Moorhead, Social Concerns Committee chair for the Student Government Association (SGA), said Tuesday’s events were meant to promote a healthy lifestyle and positive body image, which are two key goals of the week.Kelly Konya | The Observer “Exercise and nutrition are important factors that influence the way a person views him or herself,” Moorhead said. “Yoga will be a great event to strengthen muscles and promote practices to improve health and happiness.”This was the second year having a yoga and frozen yogurt event sponsored by Urban Swirl, which is a popular event and positive representation of Love Your Body Week’s goal, Moorhead said.“We like to include this event because while exercise and a healthy body are essential to a positive self-image, we want students to know that it is okay to indulge in a treat occasionally,” she said. “It is important to find the balance in our lives between exercise and a healthy diet.”Moorhead said the “True Beauty: A Definition of God” presentation challenged students to consider the ways the media defines beauty in order to gain new perspectives on what being beautiful truly means.“A new definition of beauty should help students and people of the community develop a more positive body image with a more attainable definition of beauty,” Moorhead said.Senior Wendy Oduor and Notre Dame sophomore Peace Maari presented the discussion, which was an important dialogue of the religious elements of beauty, Moorhead said.Wendy Oduor said she volunteered to give a presentation on true beauty to inform students that everyone is beautiful. Oduor is the CEO and founder of the faith-based agency Heshima Couture, an agency that advocates beauty, God and modesty.Maari said Heshima Couture’s mission is to encapsulate a new definition of what true beauty is.“Heshima Couture takes pride in modesty and knowing that it is deeper than how we dress, but rather portrays daily respect to God,” Maari said. “Therefore, Heshima Couture aspires to dress today’s men and women in confidence and with an objective to respect God’s temple.” Oduor said beauty shouldn’t count on clothing or the newest trend, it should count on inner beauty.“Every day you are beautiful,” Odour said. “God fearfully and wonderfully made you … When He created you, He created you fearfully and wonderfully … You are wonderful in every aspect.“You have to start thinking [you’re beautiful, and] you have to train your mind in a sense that I know that my God created me beautifully. When you start thinking it, it becomes a lifestyle and you start seeing it in your everyday life.”Maari said it’s important to remember our bodies are not our own but are gifts from God.“We don’t own [our bodies] this is just a loan to us from God,” Maari said. “He has given us the privilege to take his image and dress it and take care of it.”Odour said the main point she would like students to understand is true beauty comes from the word of God.“I wish Love Your Body Week was the whole year,” Odour said.”It puts things into perspective for Saint Mary’s students, that even though you are busy, remember that you are still beautifully and wonderfully made. Love Your Body Week motivates and inspires.Tags: body week, Love Your Body Week, saint mary’s, Saint Mary’s College, SMC, true beautylast_img read more

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Shamrock Challenge raises money for Special Olympics

first_imgOver the past four Sunday mornings, Notre Dame students, faculty and staff ran, rowed, biked and swam for the first annual Shamrock Challenge, sponsored by RecSports, to raise money for the St. Joseph County Special Olympics.Participants competed in a variety of athletic events spread out over the four weeks and across campus recreational facilities, earning points for miles run, sit-ups completed or inches jumped. Those who accumulated the most points throughout the month earned weekly or overall prizes provided by RecSports, Notre Dame Food Services, Legends of Notre Dame and The Vitamin Shoppe in Mishawaka.Each participant, competing as an individual or in a hall team, sponsored a Special Olympics athlete with his or her registration fee. Amy Marquez, a RecSports intern who organized the event, said Shamrock Challenge continues RecSports’ relationship with the Special Olympics after the Late Night Olympics, a similar fitness competition, ended in 2012 after 22 years due to lack of space.Marquez said she and RecSports facilities coordinator Ed Beven designed Shamrock Challenge to take place during facilities off-hours and to appeal to as many people as possible.“We wanted to try to find something to replace the Late Night Olympics, and also we were thinking of how we could get more men involved in our fitness type things,” she said. “We have a lot of group fitness things, but it’s mainly just women who are involved, so we wanted to put something together to get the men out there, and we figured men like to do competition-based things, so this is kind of the idea of it.”Shamrock Challenge began March 23 with running and rowing competitions in the Rolfs Sports Recreation Center (RSRC). The next Sunday, competitors did push-ups and rode exercise bikes in the Rockne Memorial. April 6 promoted swimming and sit-ups day at the Rolfs Aquatic Center, and this past Sunday featured a variety of activities at the RSRC, including sprints, ropes and burpees.Marquez said about 50 people registered and 35 participated. She estimated the event raised about $300. She said although space might be an issue, RecSports hopes to expand Shamrock Challenge in future years, including bringing in Special Olympics athletes to compete, as they did in the Late Night Olympics.“They go all out for these athletes, and our hope is that next year [the Special Olympics athletes] can join them and be on a team with them,” Marquez said. “We wanted to see how it would go the first year and how many numbers it would get. Hopefully next year we can do that.”Tags: Shamrock Challengelast_img read more

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Boardroom Insights: Case talks risks, non-profits

first_imgJean Case, CEO of the Case Foundation, gave a lecture on the importance of measured risk-taking and failure in the philanthropy sector as part of the Boardroom Insights Lecture Series on Friday.Case, who is nationally recognized for her philanthropic work, also serves as an advisor on the National Geographic Society Board of Trustees and the Harvard Business School Social Enterprise Initiative. In 2011, Case and her husband joined the Giving Pledge, a challenge in which members commit most of their wealth to philanthropic causes.Throughout the lecture, Case said the path to success, far from being simple, is a very “circuitous road filled with potholes.”“The fact of the matter is, almost anything significant I’ve accomplished in my life came out of failure,” Case said. “Something either didn’t go right, or there was an unexpected turn in the road.”Case said well-established philanthropic organizations, fearing the mismanagement of donor funds, are generally unwilling to take risks.“The big foundations now … don’t want to talk about failure,” she said. “They don’t want to feel like they wasted someone’s money. They don’t want to feel like they’re wasting grants, but if you’re trying new things, experimenting, taking risks, failure should be an option.”Contrasting the more traditional philanthropic business plan, the Case Foundation takes measured risks when investing in people and ideas, Case said.“If we’re going to innovate, we have to try new things, and it’s hard to find innovation without risk taking,” she said. “We came up with a series of principles that really could be brought together under the umbrella term ‘Be Fearless.”’Drawing from insights from her philanthropic work, Case said she challenges young people who have ideas to acknowledge the importance of failure in crafting a successful product.“I have one really big concern with this generation, and that is, particularly those of you … that have had some kind of privilege, they fear failure,” she said. “Your generation has the greatest ideas … but if this fear of failure stops you, you won’t be able to fully leverage your greatness.”Case said the most innovative products are not always original, but rather are sometimes refinements of existing ideas.“Many of the people we think of as geniuses didn’t come up with the ideas we associate them with,” she said. “They often came later, or they perfected it. You might see something that has potential, but someone hasn’t figured out how to take it mainstream.”When solving challenging problems, Case said it is important to recruit people with diverse backgrounds and opinions.“What’s often not understood is the importance of having people around you who are not the same as you,” she said. “And I don’t just mean in the talent and skill areas … but people with totally different points of view, totally different backgrounds. Innovation happens at intersections.”Setting big goals in personal and career commitments is a crucial step to maintaining passion in life, Case said.“To everyone, a big bet is different. Have one in your life, have one in your chosen profession,” she said. “If you don’t burn to wake up … to take forward your mission, you’re in the wrong place.”Tags: Boardroom Insights, Case Foundation, CEO, Jean Case, philanthropy, The Giving Pledgelast_img read more

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Associate dean of the College of Engineering dies

first_imgCatherine Pieronek, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and director of the women’s engineering program in the College of Engineering, died Thursday night at the age of 52 at Memorial Hospital in South Bend, according to a University press release sent Friday afternoon.Pieronek graduated from Notre Dame in 1984 with a Bachelor of Science degree in aerospace engineering and earned her law degree from the University in 1995, an obituary emailed to students said.After earning her law degree, she took up the cause of Title IX in higher education and became a leading expert on the topic, according to the release.Before joining Notre Dame’s teaching faculty in 2002, Pieronek served as Director of Alumni Relations for the its law school as well as the editor of its quarterly publication, prior to which she served as a senior systems engineer at PRW, the obituary said.When she joined the faculty, Pieronek established the women’s engineering program as part of her ongoing efforts to support women engineers on campus and spearheaded the initiative to concentrate female engineers in residence halls, the obituary said. At the time of her death, she was a fellow in the National Society of Women Engineers and served as the club advisor for the campus chapter bearing the same name, according to its website.“Cathy Pieronek was the quintessential Domer,” Peter Kilpatrick, Dean of the College of Engineering, said in the press release. “She had an engineering and a law degree, a fierce loyalty to our sports teams and our students and a total embrace of the famous ‘Irish prayer’ about the rains falling gently on your fields. She was also incredibly and lovably human: committed, personable, loyal, dedicated and always thinking carefully and deeply about the good of the other. We miss her terribly and pray for the Lord’s gentle and loving embrace of her husband, Chuck, and her family.”Visitation will be held Sunday from noon to 8 p.m. in Kaniewski Funeral Home, 3545 N. Bendix Drive, and a funeral Mass will be celebrated Monday at 9:30 a.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, followed by the burial in Cedar Grove Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Pieronek Family Scholarship Fund at Notre Dame.Tags: Cathy Pieronek, College of Engineering, Pieronek, Society of Women Engineers, Title IXlast_img read more

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Jenkins announces new center in Mexico

first_imgNotre Dame plans to open an office in Mexico City, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced Friday. “It’s a first step, with lots more to do, in making Mexico City one of seven global gateways in the world from which we can launch student and faculty exchanges, engage in joint research and build partnerships with business and with your great academic institutions,” Jenkins said in a speech to the Club de Industriales in Mexico City, which the University made public in a press release.Jenkins said Mexico is “indispensable,” and the University wants to be a part of the nation’s future. “Notre Dame is excited by the promise of innovation and applied research in collaboration with Mexican businesses and universities,” he said. “In the long run, all of that may very well buttress economies and help people out of poverty in both of our countries.”The University currently partners with the Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla two hours from Mexico City and has a site coordinator for study abroad students there, but a Mexico City center would be the sixth in a network of Notre Dame “Global Gateways” that includes London, Dublin, Jerusalem, Rome and Beijing, each with its own faculty and staff, academic programs and ability to sponsor research and events.Jenkins said while the University initially looked to Europe and Asia to build global partnerships, establishing a Mexico City center is part of an effort to direct attention southward.“That orientation is critical for understanding the changing demographics of the United States,” Jenkins said. “It is critical for higher education. And it is critical for the future of the Catholic Church in the United States. It is also critical to confronting economic and social issues of the Americas North and South; and how Catholic educators in both hemispheres come to terms with providing the great equalizer — a good education — to rich and poor alike.”According to Paul Browne, University vice president for public affairs and communications, there is currently no concrete timeline for the project.The University’s ties to Mexico date back to the late 1800s, according to Browne. “Fr. Zahm, who was the vice president of Notre Dame at the time, was a scholar on Latin American geology and archaeology and he went on digs in Mexico for some artifacts. … During his exposure, he saw an opportunity to get Mexican students to Notre Dame, he arranged for private train cars all the way from Chihuahua to South Bend,” Browne said. According to Browne, there are currently 35 students from Mexico studying full time at the University.In the speech, Jenkins criticized divisive comments directed at Mexico and Mexicans living in the United States, calling such comments “churlish, insulting political theater, for certain.”“The vitriol directed at the Irish — felt by Irishmen serving in the U.S. Army who defected to Mexico — and later the Italians, and other waves of immigrants to the United States — sadly is not a thing of the past; certainly not for Mexicans in the United States who have been slandered in extraordinary ways, as has Mexico itself,” Jenkins said. Tags: Fr. John Jenkins, Global Gateway, Mexicolast_img read more

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Notre Dame announces master’s degree in data science

first_imgSilicon Valley, here come the Irish.Notre Dame announced a new online Master of Science degree with a specialization in data science Tuesday, according to a University press release. The program is the result of a collaboration with AT&T and is meant to prepare graduates for careers as data scientists in a variety of industries.The 21-month degree program is offered by the department of applied and computational mathematics and statistics, in partnership with the department of computer science and engineering, the Mendoza College of Business and the department of psychology. At the pace of half of a full-time load, the program aims to attract working professionals, offering experience in management, marketing, information technology, government policy, health care, finance education and scientific research.“A graduate of this new program will be equipped with the academic training, analytical insight, imagination and practical skills necessary for success as a data scientist,” Elliott Visconsi, Notre Dame’s chief academic digital officer, said in the release. “Graduates will have the flexibility of mind to master new data science processes, tools and strategies as they emerge, and the ability to communicate effectively and act ethically in this exciting and fast-moving field.”Participants will be invited to weekend immersions with faculty and industry experts at Notre Dame and in Silicon Valley.AT&T experts will help design the program’s curriculum, according to the release. Current AT&T employees will also be eligible for discounted tuition and other benefits.“Every technology going forward must factor in software and data analytics — whether it’s 5G networks, internet of things, artificial intelligence or any of today’s numerous industry drivers,” John Donovan, AT&T’s chief strategy officer and group president of technology and operations said in the release. “AT&T is proud to collaborate with Notre Dame on this innovative online degree program to skill the next generation of data scientists.”The program is open for students of all academic backgrounds to apply, and begins in August 2017. More information can be found at datascience.nd.edu.Tags: AT&T, data science, master of science in data science, mendoza college of business, Silicon Valleylast_img read more

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Lecture addresses flaws in the U.S. Constitution

first_imgHonoring the Constitution Day holiday, Sanford Levinson, professor of government at the University of Texas presented his lecture “Flaws in the Constitution? What We Should Be Learning About the Constitution Today” in South Dining Hall’s Oak Room Monday afternoon. Sponsored by the Constitutional Studies Program, Tocqueville Program, Jack Miller Center and Notre Dame Research, Levinson’s talk explored the areas of the Constitution that need improvement and proposed the idea of a new constitutional convention.Drawing upon the works he has written over the years, Levinson started by stating his overall view of the Constitution.“I think you can demonstrate that, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that the United States Constitution is the most undemocratic constitution of a major western democracy,” Levinson said.He said the United States Constitution is far less democratic than each individual U.S. state constitution, a point he outlines in his 2012 book, “Framed: America’s 51 Constitutions and the Crisis of Governance.” Levinson endorses a new constitutional convention to amend some of the flaws that he sees in the document, in part because our current Constitution alienates the American people from the political system.“Wherever you are on the political spectrum, left, right or center, liberal or conservative, it really doesn’t matter — the odds are very high that you don’t believe the national government will respond adequately to whatever you happen to believe are the chief issues of the day,” Levinson said.Levinson proceeded to elaborate on the specific defects of the Constitution, and said the checks and balances present in the document are so nuanced that they rarely all align to achieve major change. His further analysis on this topic can be found in his recently released book, “Fault Lines in the Constitution: The Framers, Their Fights and the Flaws That Affect Us Today,” which Levinson co-wrote with his wife, Cynthia Levinson.Levinson said the framers of the Constitution did well considering the time period, but there were decisions made that we should not be bound to uphold today.One of Levinson’s major critiques attacked the Senate as an institution whose electoral policies are harmful, saying that it is not fair that places like Wyoming and Californiam or Vermont and Texas have the same number of senators considering the massive difference in population. Levinson said he and his wife, in their book, addressed faults of the Constitution that they believe are not taught enough, including people overly praising the Bill of Rights, the presidential veto that restricts bicameralism and gives the president too much power and the Electoral College process that leads to campaigning only in battleground states.Regardless of whether or not the American people think there should or should not be a second constitutional amendment, Levinson closed by asking people to question these constitutional issues.“Do we in 2017 have sufficient faith in one another to believe that we the people in 2017 can engage in genuine reflection and choice, can talk about the lessons of experience and propose what I think are needed changes?” Levinson said. Tags: constitution, Constitution Day, Sanford Levinsonlast_img read more

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Notre Dame feels effect of national flu outbreak

first_imgThis flu season, a particularly virulent strain of the disease is sweeping the nation. The Notre Dame community has not found itself exempt from the outbreak.“On campus, we have seen 30 percent more cases of flu this year as compared with this time last year,” Sharon McMullen, director of University Health Services said in an email. “Although we have not seen an overwhelming surge in cases, there has been a steady increase since the beginning of the second semester.”There are several factors behind this year’s unusually severe season, including both the strain of disease itself and outside influences such as the weather.“This year’s predominant strain, H3N2, typically causes widespread outbreaks and severe symptoms.  It is associated with more hospitalizations, deaths and illnesses than other strains,” McMullen said. “The bitterly cold temperatures this winter may be a factor in flu transmission this year, with many people staying inside, gathered in close quarters.”Another contributing factor to this year’s widespread flu outbreak is people not getting vaccinated, Rebecca Moskwinski, University Health Services medical director, said.“Vaccination is the first step in preventing the flu,” Moskwinski said in an email. “Even though there has been publicity about the flu shot not being as effective this year, it can still help to prevent severe flu cases, hospitalizations, and often can prevent the flu altogether.”Students are still able to receive the flu vaccine at Walgreens in St. Liam’s. In addition to getting a flu shot, McMullen said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggested several day-to-day strategies for staying healthy.“CDC recommends covering your cough, washing your hands with soap and water often, avoiding touching your eyes, nose and mouth and disinfecting surfaces frequently,” McMullen said. “Stopping the spread of germs is essential.”Nevertheless, once germs have spread, little can be done to stop symptoms from spreading, McMullen said.“Flu symptoms include sudden onset of fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache and fatigue,” McMullen said. “Once flu is widespread in the community, as it is now, testing is of little value.”Staying hydrating and taking medicine to reduce a fever can help treat symptoms, McMullen said. Testing and treatment is more important for at-risk populations, such as children, the elderly and people with medical conditions like asthma or heart disease, she added. For everyone else, it is often a matter of self-care.“Most people without those risk factors who get the flu have mild illness and don’t need antiviral medication,” McMullen said. “Most people recover from flu without treatment within a week or two.”Tags: Flu season, Flu shots, health and wellness, University Health Serviceslast_img read more

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‘We want to help you bring your home to Saint Mary’s’: College celebrates Mardi Gras

first_imgSara Schlecht | The Obse Students gather at Rice Commons at Saint Mary’s to celebrate Mardi Gras on Tuesday. The holiday takes place the day before Ash Wednesday every year as Catholics prepare for the beginning of Lent.Feathers, sequins and king cake drew students to Rice Commons on Tuesday evening for a Mardi Gras celebration hosted by the Student Activity Board (SAB) Traditional Committee.Junior Mary Grace Noteman, chair of the traditional committee, said SAB worked hard to plan activities and provide refreshments for those who attended the event.“We have some coloring activities and things to help de-stress before Lent kicks in,” Noteman said. “It’s for people to hang out and have fun and have something to eat after dinner.”Throughout the room, tables were scattered with craft supplies to decorate masks. After-dinner treats came in the form of about 15 king cakes — oval-shaped cinnamon cakes with sugar frosting in colors of gold, green and purple. These cakes are a Mardi Gras staple.Junior Sarah Catherine Caldwell, SAB vice president, said the group tried to get king cakes from Mobile, Alabama, but shipping them across the country proved difficult because the city’s Mardi Gras celebration is lesser known than that of New Orleans.“Our king cakes are from Gambino’s bakery in New Orleans, Louisiana,” Caldwell said. “They’ve been shipped from Louisiana and overnighted by FedEx.”Caldwell, who hails from Mobile, is particularly interested in the history of Mardi Gras celebrations in the United States, as the first occurred in her hometown in 1703. She noted that most people associate Mardi Gras with New Orleans but might not be familiar with the holiday’s history and presence in other parts of the country.“Nothing shuts Mobile down like Mardi Gras — except for a hurricane,” she said.During her first year at Saint Mary’s, Caldwell wasn’t particularly impressed with the Mardi Gras celebrations on campus because they didn’t feel like home. She thought the celebration was over the top.“Bigger isn’t always better,” she said.This philosophy guided Caldwell in her vision for future celebrations, which occur annually at the College. Through her involvement with SAB, she tries to make sure cultural events on campus do justice to the people who associate them with home.When it comes to Mardi Gras, getting the king cake right is important, she asserted, as there are students who come from places like New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast who are familiar with the cake’s traditional role in the celebration.“Growing up, king cake was an integral part of my Mardi Gras experience,” Caldwell said. “We knew we had to have king cake for this event.”Because of her role on SAB, Caldwell said she has a unique privilege to plan an event that brings part of her home to Saint Mary’s.“Not everyone gets to plan an event that brings their home to South Bend,” Caldwell said. “I’m just so happy that I get to do that. I love Mardi Gras. It’s one of my favorite things.”In addition to its connections to her home, Caldwell emphasized the importance of Mardi Gras for Saint Mary’s as a Catholic institution, as the annual holiday anticipates the start of Lent on Ash Wednesday.“It’s one of the ways we prepare for Lent for those that are practicing Catholics,” Caldwell said. “You load up on those carbs and then you fast [on Wednesday].”The community aspect of Mardi Gras is something SAB tried to emphasize in Tueday’s event, Noteman said.“Mardi Gras is amazing,” she said. “Everyone comes together, enjoying it and taking part in this celebration … it’s such a happy time.”For Caldwell, the religious significance surrounding Mardi Gras is also important to consider.“You celebrate … and then you go into Lent immediately after this big party,” Caldwell said. “Lent is such a somber time of self-reflection.”Because SAB aims to engage the campus community with its events, the organization is open to students suggesting themes for celebrations or gatherings. Caldwell said she would be happy to discuss SAB doing events like the Mardi Gras celebration for students interested in planning cultural events.“We want to help you bring your home to Saint Mary’s, our home,” she said.Tags: Mardi Gras, saint mary’s, Student Activities Boardlast_img read more

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