A Lament for Confederation a speech by Chief Dan George in 1967

first_imgAPTN National NewsHow long have I known you, Oh Canada? A hundred years? Yes, a hundred years. And many, many seelanum more. And today, when you celebrate your hundred years, Oh Canada, I am sad for all the Indian people throughout the land.For I have known you when your forests were mine; when they gave me my meat and my clothing. I have known you in your streams and rivers where your fish flashed and danced in the sun, where the waters said ‘come, come and eat of my abundance.’ I have known you in the freedom of the winds. And my spirit, like the winds, once roamed your good lands.But in the long hundred years since the white man came, I have seen my freedom disappear like the salmon going mysteriously out to sea. The white man’s strange customs, which I could not understand, pressed down upon me until I could no longer breathe.When I fought to protect my land and my home, I was called a savage. When I neither understood nor welcomed his way of life, I was called lazy. When I tried to rule my people, I was stripped of my authority.My nation was ignored in your history textbooks _ they were little more important in the history of Canada than the buffalo that ranged the plains. I was ridiculed in your plays and motion pictures, and when I drank your fire-water, I got drunk _ very, very drunk. And I forgot.Oh Canada, how can I celebrate with you this centenary, this hundred years? Shall I thank you for the reserves that are left to me of my beautiful forests? For the canned fish of my rivers? For the loss of my pride and authority, even among my own people? For the lack of my will to fight back? No! I must forget what’s past and gone.Oh God in heaven! Give me back the courage of the olden chiefs. Let me wrestle with my surroundings. Let me again, as in the days of old, dominate my environment. Let me humbly accept this new culture and through it rise up and go on.Oh God! Like the thunderbird of old I shall rise again out of the sea; I shall grab the instruments of the white man’s success _ his education, his skills, and with these new tools I shall build my race into the proudest segment of your society. Before I follow the great chiefs who have gone before us, Oh Canada, I shall see these things come to pass.I shall see our young braves and our chiefs sitting in the houses of law and government, ruling and being ruled by the knowledge and freedoms of our great land. So shall we shatter the barriers of our isolation. So shall the next hundred years be the greatest in the proud history of our tribes and nations.last_img read more

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Mayor tribal council call for calm as jury deliberates

first_imgThe Canadian PressBATTLEFORD, Sask. – There are calls for calm as a Saskatchewan jury continues deliberating the fate of a farmer charged in the fatal shooting of a young Indigenous man.Gerald Stanley, 56, is charged with second-degree murder in the death of 22-year-old Colten Boushie from the Red Pheasant First Nation in August 2016.Court has heard that Boushie was shot in the head with a handgun while he was sitting in the driver’s seat of an SUV that had been driven onto Stanley’s farm near Biggar, Sask.“This case has cracked open the racial undercurrent in Saskatchewan with the potential to further drive a wedge of mistrust between communities,” Saskatoon Tribal Council Chief Mark Arcand and Saskatoon Mayor Charlie Clark said in a joint statement.“We cannot build our future with hateful dialogue and divisiveness. As we await the verdict and wonder what impact this could have on our province, and more importantly, our relations with each other, we must continue to work with each other in a good way, in a respectful way.”The jury spent Friday morning listening to testimony from Stanley and his son.Boushie’s uncle, Alvin Baptiste, said now it’s just a waiting game.“I’m hoping the jury will do the right thing,” he said. “Right now, it’s pretty hard to predict where it’s going to go. They might decide second (degree murder), manslaughter, acquittal, a hung jury – so that’s where I’m at.”The family is anxious for the case to wrap up, he added.“It’s been hanging over my family’s head for quite a while. You know it’s time that my family starts to heal and move on.”The trial has heard that the SUV that Boushie and four others were in that day had a flat tire. The driver testified the group had been drinking and tried to break into a truck on a neighbouring farm, but went to the Stanley property in search of help with the tire.Defence lawyer Scott Spencer has argued Boushie died as a result of a freak accident when the gun misfired and Stanley never intended to hurt anyone. Crown prosecutor Bill Burge disputed that Stanley believed the firearm was empty and that the gun could have had a misfire, or hang fire.The case has exposed an ugly side in rural Saskatchewan – landowners who blame Indigenous people for high rates of property crime and First Nations who bear the brunt of that racism and hate.With the trial coming to an end the RCMP issued a statement reminding all people and parties to “conduct themselves in a peaceful and civil manner regardless of the outcome.”RCMP also warned people will be held responsible for what they say or post online and police will investigate any complaints of suspected criminal behaviour.last_img read more

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Incomprehensible failure Auditor general says federal government not improving life for Indigenous

first_imgLucy ScholeyAPTN NewsThe federal government’s inability to help improve life for Indigenous people in Canada is an “incomprehensible failure,” according to the auditor general.A new scathing audit report states Indigenous Services Canada has not adequately collected data – and sometimes reported inaccurate data – about the well-being of First Nations living on reserve.With incomplete information on factors like education, income and health, Indigenous Services Canada has also failed to track the country’s progress in closing socioeconomic gaps between on-reserve First Nations and the rest of Canada, the report concludes.“There are so many discussions about the need to close the socio-economic gaps between Indigenous people and other Canadians in this country and we don’t see those gaps closing,” said Auditor General Michael Ferguson on Tuesday, after the report was tabled in the House of Commons.“We don’t even see that they know how to measure those gaps.”That also means Parliamentarians who have rubber-stamped funding for Indigenous communities have not had the full picture of life on-reserve.For example, the report states government spent $42 million over four years (2012-2013 to 2015-2016) for a First Nations post-secondary education preparation program.But auditors found only eight per cent of those enrolled actually completed program.“Despite these poor results, the department did not work with First Nations or education institutions to improve the success rates,” said Ferguson.The report also found the department reported inaccurate data to Parliament concerning the number of First Nations students who graduated high school within four years.The department reported almost half of First Nations students (46 per cent) finished high school, on average, between 2011 and 2016.However, auditors found only 24 per cent who started high school in grade 9 actually finished in four years.“These findings matter because, without complete and accurate information, Canadians, First Nations, and Parliamentarians were not fully informed about the true extent of First Nations’ education results or the education gap,” the report reads.The federal government was also “inconsistent” in its funding approach to educating students over age 21. While an elementary and secondary education program was meant for students aged four to 21, a “significant” number of students over the age limit were funded. Yet other older students wishing to return to high school were denied funding.Also, despite 30 years of federal funding to various employment training programs for Indigenous people, the report concludes the federal government failed to track whether more Indigenous people are successfully finding jobs and staying employed.“They didn’t have a definition of what sustainable employment means,” said Ferguson. “Even if somebody got a part-time job or a job for five days working on a construction project, they counted that as one of the clients getting a job, even though it’s very short-term.”Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott said she welcomes the report’s findings, noting the Liberal government is working with First Nations to better track progress on closing socioeconomic gaps.Contrary to Ferguson’s characterization of the report’s findings, Philpott said the gaps are “absolutely comprehensible” considering how Indigenous programs and services have been underfunded for generations.But Ferguson said past governments are not solely to blame.The new Indigenous Services Canada department received $2.6 billion to fund its core education funding budget from the 2016-2017 fiscal year until 2020-2021. However, auditors deemed the department’s analysis to support this amount was “insufficient.”In August 2017, the federal government announced it was splitting Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada into two different departments: Indigenous Services Canada and Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs.Ferguson said this could be a step towards improving services for First Nations – but we won’t know unless there’s a way to track the outcomes.“What we really need to see is actual changes in results.”lscholey@aptn.calast_img read more

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Kivalliq youth want next 20 years in Nunavut to be devoted to

first_imgCharlotte Morritt-JacobsAPTN NewsAtuat Shouldice points out the usual attractions in his home community of ᑲᖏᕿᓂᖅ, Rankin Inlet, Nunavut.This includes the Red Top convenience store, Victor’s playground and the defunct nickel mine ruins known as the “elephant graveyard.”“Pretty well everyone my age, it was their playground when they were kids. If you remembered playing around there you had a pretty good childhood,” Shouldice said.He wants the same childhood for his two sons.“Rankin’s home. Nunavut’s home. I want to raise my boys here,” he said.What he doesn’t want is the same resource extraction jobs paving their economic future.Shouldice, 32, grew up in Rankin Inlet, population 2,842.It is one of the largest communities in the territory and his sons help make up the nearly 30 per-cent of the town who are under 14 years of age.(Atuart Shouldice with his children, Akkiutq, left, and Cylas. “Nunavut’s home. I want to raise my boys here.” Photo: Atuart Shouldice)After working as a labourer at the mineral mines nearby, he attended school in Iqaluit for an environmental technician program.He is now a water resource officer with the federal government.But, he dreams of a future where he can work full-time guiding on-the-land and sharing his culture with the rest of Canada.For many like him, government and mining jobs are the only feasible work to cover the high-cost of living here.“There’s a $2,000 rifle there, with a bag and scope and a sled that is $1,300 packed with rope and wood. A $1,600 snow mobile that also has to be modified so it works in this environment.”Shouldice is pleased by the territory’s greater focus placed on Nunavummiut post-secondary education.While he will support his son’s decision to stay or leave the community, he hopes his boys will be able to explore a more diverse range of jobs.“When you come back with knowledge about anything, any trade, any profession, you come back with knowledge and can pass on that knowledge to someone who is from here, to onsite training, they are always celebrated,” Shouldice said.(Dogs stand guard in Rankin Inlet. Nunavut’s economy is on step to grow by an average of 7.3 per cent until 2020.  Photo: Charlotte Morritt-Jacobs/APTN) That pride is exactly what Donovan Gordan-Tootoo, 22, has found while enrolled with Nunavut Sanikiluaq, a transitional university program offered in Ottawa for Inuit students.“It taught us a lot about our history about the land claims agreement and how that came to be,” he said. “Learning about that stuff is quite important. I figure it brings us a lot more perspective about the north and where we’re from.“I figured why didn’t we have any of these taught to us when we were in high school.” He is back from school and working at the local mines to save money.He’s not against natural resource exploration, he just wants to see his people benefit from the foreseen economic boom.“The Kivalliq Inuit Organization does get royalties from the mine, so I’m hoping that they’ll be able to use that to create programs for Inuit that will benefit the health of the communities.“I believe it is possible to provide options that will last longer than the mines,” he said.(Donovan Gordan-Tootoo with his niece in Rankin Inlet. Photo courtesy: Jessica Davey-Quantick/UpHere Magazine)The time to invest is now.According to the Conference Board of Canada, Nunavut’s economy is on step to grow by an average of 7.3 per cent until 2020.The Canadian average economic growth for the same period is blow two per cent.This is due to the Agnico Eagle’s Meliadine mine, Amaruq satellite, and Sabina operations.Gold production is forecast to peak in 2024 with the territory’s economy expected to grow by an average of 4.6 per cent each year.Gordan-Tootoo would like to see profits from the mine support sustainable and cultural employment industries like hunting and Inuit arts, something Terri Kusugak agrees with.Kusugak, 24, is an artist from Rankin Inlet.She has been involved with Qaggiavuut – a performing arts group as she attends school down south to study her craft.“Growing up in Rankin, it was charmed. I got to live a very special life. With my parents and sisters,” she said.However, Kusugak said that finding a job in her field upon graduation is going to be tricky.Despite increase demand for local employees and higher post-secondary graduation rates, young Nunavummiut often must return home to live with their parents as they scramble to find work.“These jobs are not being filled out by the most knowledgeable, they’re filling out by the people who volunteer to come up here. These jobs are not renowned jobs that people fight for, they’re the jobs that they take on their way up the ladder.“So these people are here temporarily to make their money, to work at higher status then they might be awarded in their own communities, and we are left feeling the other side,” Kusugak said.(Terri Kusugak says she wants the Nunavut government to work at providing better jobs for Nunavummiut. Photo courtesy: Jessica Davey-Quantick/UpHere Magazine)According to 2018 statistics, for every three jobs in the Nunavut government, one job is held by an Inuk, the second position held by a non-Inuk and the third job is vacant.Kusugak wants the territorial government to make good on their promises for more Inuit representation in senior positions.“Rankin is expanding, we’re expecting to have 500 people here in the next year or two because of the mines. So Rankin is only going to get bigger so those trade jobs are seemingly never going to run out.“There’s always going to be jobs for those people. But when you look at the Inuit hiring rate you’ll see that Inuit are hired in each department, but Inuit are more likely to hold menial jobs. Which means that your superiors, your bosses, are all white,” she said.(An Inuksuk stands watch over Rankin Inlet, signifying safety, hope and friendship. Photo: Charlotte Morritt-Jacobs/APTN)Neither Shouldice, Gordan-Tootoo or Kusugak have a vision of their beloved Rankin being run by anyone other than those who grew up there.To ensure this is not the case, cultural practices must be intergrated into the economic outlook for Nunavut.And for Atuat Shouldice, this plays out in sharing his territory in the future.“I have tents and can accommodate. As long as they are in town I can accommodate the person. I can show them wildlife, polar bears and caribou, falcons.“The wildlife they want to see and I can tour them around town to meet people and see different things.” Shouldice said.cmorrittjacobs@aptn.ca@aptncharlottelast_img read more

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Boeing draws first blood as US Commerce Department hits Bombardier hard

first_imgOTTAWA – Bombardier’s hopes for breaking into the U.S. commercial aviation market took a massive blow on Tuesday, as the U.S. Department of Commerce proposed a hefty 219 per cent duty on its CSeries jets.The department ruled in a preliminary decision that Bombardier benefited from improper government subsidies, which gave the Montreal-based company an unfair advantage when selling south of the border.The investigation was sparked by a complaint from U.S. aerospace giant Boeing, after Bombardier secured a deal for up to 125 of its CS100s with Delta Air Lines in April 2016.The list price for the planes is around $6 billion, but the actual amount of money involved in the deal has not been made public and Boeing alleges Bombardier offered them for much less.The financial penalties aren’t officially due until Bombardier delivers the first CS100 to Delta, which is expected in the spring. They could also still be dropped or refunded.The key will be whether the U.S. International Trade Commissions finds that Bombardier-Delta deal actually hurt Boeing’s business, a decision that’s not expected until the spring.But the ruling gives Boeing momentum as the dispute drags on, and more leverage in any future talks between the Trudeau government and the Chicago-based company to reach a negotiated settlement.Boeing wasted no time in declaring victory on Tuesday.“Subsidies enabled Bombardier to dump its product into the U.S. market, harming aerospace workers in the United States and throughout Boeing’s global supply chain,” the company said in a statement.The dispute is not about limiting innovation or competition, it continued. “Rather, it has everything to do with maintaining a level playing field and ensuring that aerospace companies abide by trade agreements.”U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross said in his own statement that while the United States values its relationship with Canada, “even our closest allies must play by the rules.”Meanwhile, Bombardier and the Trudeau government appeared to be reeling. Most had expected the Commerce Department to rule against Bombardier, but the size of the proposed duty was surprising.Boeing had been asking for an 80 per cent duty.“The magnitude of the proposed duty is absurd and divorced from the reality about the financing of multibillion-dollar aircraft programs,” Bombardier said in a statement.“Boeing is seeking to use a skewed process to stifle competition and prevent U.S. airlines and their passengers from benefiting from the CSeries.”British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Twitter Wednesday that she was “bitterly disappointed” by the U.S. ruling.She said her government “will continue to work with the company to protect vital jobs for Northern Ireland,” where Bombardier employs more than 4,000 people at its factories in Belfast.Speaking before the ruling, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to continue to stand with Bombardier and Canada’s aerospace industry. He also once again threatened to cut government ties with Boeing.“Certainly we won’t deal with a company that’s attacking us and attacking thousands of Canadian jobs,” Trudeau said outside the House of Commons.But Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland made no mention of retaliatory action in a statement released after the ruling, promising instead to continue raising the dispute with U.S. officials at all levels.Tuesday’s finding was actually the first of two that the Commerce Department is scheduled to release on Bombardier. Attention now turns to whether it “dumped” CS100s into the U.S. by selling them below cost.That finding is scheduled on Oct. 4, but could be delayed.But the real question, which is being tackled by the U.S. International Trade Commission, is whether the deal between Bombardier and Delta hurt Boeing.That ruling, which is expected in the spring, will be the key to whether any duties slapped on the CS100s become permanent or whether the case is dismissed and all duties are lifted.Boeing contends that by breaking U.S. and global trade laws, Bombardier created an unfair playing field in the aerospace industry that poses a risk to its long-term business.But Bombardier and its supporters are clearly banking on the trade commission siding with them, now that the Commerce Department has come out with its preliminary findings against the Canadian company.Even if that is the case, however, either side can appeal the entire case to the U.S. Court of International Trade, bring it before NAFTA dispute bodies, or even take the matter to the World Trade Organization.Quebec Finance Minister Carlos Leitao, whose government invested US$1 billion for a 49.5 per cent stake in the CSeries program last year, said he was confident that Bombardier would beat Boeing.But he tempered his optimism by noting that it could take a long time to resolve the case, which Leitao said could hurt Bombardier — and which is why Quebec will continue to support the company.“At the end of the day, as often happens in this type of dispute, the Canadian side will win,” he told The Canadian Press in New York. “Now that day could be a very long day, so that’s where the risks come from.”It was the second bit of bad news for Bombardier on Tuesday — two European railway manufacturers announced they were merging and would present a united front against the Montreal-based company.But there was also a glimmer of good news, after a senior Bombardier official said the firm was hoping to close several deals with Chinese airlines.— with reporting from Andy Blatchford in New York and Ross Marowits in Montreal.— Follow @leeberthiaume on Twitter.last_img read more

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Morneau says Canada should be exempt from new US tariffs on steel

first_imgTORONTO – Finance Minister Bill Morneau says Canada should be exempted from the aluminum and steel tariffs U.S. President Donald Trump is weighing.He says Canada is a “staunch ally” of the U.S. and that it has been “firm” in its opposition to the tariffs.Speaking at a women’s entrepreneurship event in Toronto, he stressed the tariffs are not advantageous to either country or national security.Morneau’s comments came hours after Trump tweeted he would nix aluminum and steel tariffs if NAFTA negotiations end with a new agreement that’s more favourable for the U.S.The latest round of NAFTA talks are concluding this week in Mexico City.The Trump administration has been citing national security as the reason why it’s eying tariffs of 10 per cent on aluminum and 25 per cent on steel.last_img read more

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Congress challenge How to tame industry giant Facebook

first_imgWASHINGTON – Facebook isn’t just a company. It’s a behemoth, with 2.1 billion monthly users, $40 billion in revenue and more than 25,000 employees worldwide.And that leaves Washington with a daunting task: How do you tame a corporate giant? Or do you even try?“It’s tricky and it’s going to be hard, but there are ways it can be dealt with,” says Virginia Sen. Mark Warner, a former tech executive who has led investigations into Russian interference on social media over the last year as the top Democrat on the Intelligence Committee. “The idea that we’re going to keep the wild, wild West — I don’t think it’s sustainable.”The picture will begin to come into focus next week. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is scheduled to testify April 10 and 11 before Senate and House committees as his company grapples with the privacy scandal involving Cambridge Analytica, a political consulting firm linked to President Donald Trump.Facebook’s reckoning in Washington comes on multiple fronts. Russia’s use of the platform to meddle in U.S. elections, a regulatory investigation that could result in fines of hundreds of millions of dollars against the company for privacy violations, and the Cambridge Analytica episode are all topmost concerns.But in the capital’s pro-business, anti-regulatory climate, it’s questionable whether the Republican-led Congress or Trump regulators have the appetite to rein it in.Facebook is spending millions on lobbying to try to ward off regulations, even seeking to narrow a Senate bill that lawmakers call “the lightest touch possible.” It would require more transparency in online political ads, something Facebook says it is providing on its own.But the stakes grew Wednesday when Facebook revealed that information belonging to as many as 87 million of its users may have been improperly shared with Cambridge Analytica, which gathered the data with the intent of swaying elections. That number was far higher than originally known.Congress’ response to the myriad issues dogging Facebook could depend on Zuckerberg himself. He has apologized for a “major breach of trust” in the Cambridge Analytica episode and Facebook has announced it would stop working with third-party data collectors.Privacy advocates and legal experts say that’s not enough.“It strikes me as a company that is trying to weather a PR storm and then get back to business as usual and hoping their users forget this ever happened,” said Nate Cardozo, a senior staff attorney for Electronic Frontier Foundation, a privacy group based in San Francisco.Facebook and other social media companies have faced bipartisan criticism over both privacy issues and the Russian intervention. But Trump and his pro-business GOP allies on Capitol Hill have made rolling back Obama-era regulations a priority, which makes any new federal rules for protecting data and privacy unlikely in the immediate future.Republicans last year struck down online privacy regulations issued during President Barack Obama’s final months in office that would have given consumers more control over how companies like Comcast, AT&T and Verizon share information. Critics complained that the rule would have increased costs, stifled innovation and picked winners and losers among internet companies.And Congress elected to do nothing after Equifax disclosed in September that hackers exploited a software flaw that the credit monitoring company failed to fix, exposing Social Security numbers, birthdates and other personal data belonging to nearly 148 million Americans.Lawmakers have yet to come up with a fix for the patchwork of conflicting state laws that govern how companies shield personal data and notify consumers when breaches occur. Mike Litt, consumer campaign director at U.S. PIRG, a public interest group, said Congress instead is considering legislation that would exempt credit bureaus from data break notifications and make it harder for states to hold them accountable.“After the Equifax data breach, we saw Congress talk a good game but fail to follow through on helping consumers,” Litt said. “To prevent Congress from letting Facebook off the hook, outraged Americans need to keep up the heat.”To defend its interests in Washington, Facebook has filled its executive ranks with former senior government officials from both political parties. Nathaniel Gleicher, its director of cybersecurity policy, was in charge of cybersecurity policy at the National Security Council during the Obama administration. Joel Kaplan, Facebook’s vice-president for global public policy, served as a senior aide to President George W. Bush.The company spent just over $13 million on lobbying in 2017, according to disclosure records filed with Congress. One of the lobbying team’s newer members, Sandra Luff, was Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ national security adviser when he served in the Senate.Zuckerberg suggested during a CNN interview last month that he’s open to regulation. But he quickly qualified that commitment, saying he’d get behind the “right” kind of rules, such as the bill that requires online political ads to disclose who paid for them. But the company is seeking to weaken even that bill.Warner acknowledged that even minor regulation of Facebook and other technology companies will be difficult. But he’s encouraging them to work with Washington now, before a “catastrophic event” that could shift the landscape or if Democrats win back seats in November’s elections.He suggests several possibilities: requiring Facebook and other companies to disclose the country of origin of ads, creating a self-regulatory body, or even allowing users to move their data from one platform to another.More drastic measures could be to allow users to own their own data or to hold social media companies more responsible for what is posted on their platforms.In Europe, Facebook and other tech giants like Google are bracing for tough new data privacy rules that take effect May 25 and will apply to any company that collects data on EU residents, no matter where it is based. The rules will make it easier for consumers to give and withdraw consent for the use of their data.In the U.S., Facebook’s biggest challenge may come from the Federal Trade Commission, which is investigating whether the company violated the terms of a 2011 settlement that made privacy assurances.Facebook agreed then to settle the commission’s charges that it deceived users by assuring them their information would remain private, then repeatedly allowing it to be shared and made public. Each violation of the agreement could carry a penalty of up to $40,000, according to settlement terms, meaning potential fines in the hundreds of millions.Frank Pasquale, a University of Maryland law professor who’s written extensively about how corporations use personal data, said the federal government’s antitrust enforcers should be more vigilant with Facebook.Facebook has completed dozens of mergers and acquisitions since it was founded in 2004. Pasquale said the Obama administration failed to realize the significance of two of Facebook’s largest purchases: the photo-sharing app Instagram for $1 billion in 2012 and WhatsApp two years later for nearly $22 billion.“This is clearly a monopolistic company that is trying to eliminate even the smallest challenge to its domination of the social media market,” he said.The privacy scandal has taken a heavy financial toll on Zuckerberg and Facebook. Forbes Magazine estimated that Zuckerberg’s net worth dropped over the last month from $71 billion to $61.7 billion. Facebook’s market value has fallen by more than $88 billion in less than three weeks since the scandal broke, from nearly $538 billion in mid-March to about $449.5 billion.___Associated Press writer Marley Jay in New York contributed to this report.last_img read more

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CPPIB investing US1474 million for 45 stake in Santa Monica Business Park

first_imgTORONTO – Canada Pension Plan Investment Board and a partner have acquired the Santa Monica Business Park in California in a transaction valued at US$627.5 million.CPPIB says it will invest US$147.4 million for a 45 per cent interest in the West Los Angeles business park.Its joint venture partner in the acquisition is Boston Properties Inc., which will invest US$180.1 million and provide operating, property management and leasing services.The purchase is also being funded with US$300 million of financing.CPPIB managing director Hilary Spann said in a statement that the investment provides the Toronto-based pension fund manager with a sizable presence with the West L.A. office market.She said Santa Monica makes for an attractive market with strong demand driven by technology and media firms in the area.last_img read more

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Toronto stocks fall US markets mixed Loonie up against US dollar

first_imgTORONTO — Canada’s main stock index was lower in late-morning trading amid losses in the energy, financial and industrial sectors, while the loonie edged up compared with the U.S. dollar.The S&P/TSX composite index was down 28.54 points at 15,104.58.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was down 147.48 points at 24,933.02. The S&P 500 index was down 9.62 points at 2,691.96, while the Nasdaq composite was up 0.83 of a point at 7,137.22.The Canadian dollar traded higher at 75.62 cents US compared with an average of 75.56 cents US on Wednesday.The January crude oil contract was up 71 cents at US$57.15 per barrel and the December natural gas contract was down 66.0 cents at US$4.18 per mmBTU.The December gold contract was up US$3.60 at US$1,213.70 an ounce and the December copper contract was up 4.35 cents at US$2.75 a pound.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Shaws Freedom Mobile launches new promotion in latest challenge to bigger rivals

first_imgCompanies in this story: (TSX:SJR.B, TSX:RCI.B, TSX:BCE, TSX:T)The Canadian Press CALGARY — Freedom Mobile has launched a new promotion that takes a novel approach to dealing with data overages, which can be an expensive extra cost if usage goes beyond the monthly plan’s limits.The wireless arm of Shaw Communications Inc. is offering 100 gigabytes of extra data to new and existing customers — provided they sign up for a two-year plan with new handset for $60 per month.The offer will be available for only a limited time in provinces served by Freedom, but the company hasn’t disclosed when it will end.Freedom says the bonus data pool won’t expire, but will be automatically applied when a customer exceeds a qualifying plan’s normal monthly limit.The Big Binge Bonus promotion is Freedom’s latest tactic for distinguishing itself from Canada’s national wireless carriers owned by Rogers, Bell and Telus.In October 2017, Freedom challenged its three bigger rivals by offering a plan with 10 gigabytes per month for $50 — at the time a relatively large amount of data for the price.The three national carriers later launched aggressive discounts and promotions in the weeks before the 2017 year-end holiday period, often the biggest selling opportunity for Canadian mobile carriers.last_img read more

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Government hiring 50 new pharmacists across BC

first_imgThe team-based clinical pharmacists will focus on working directly with patients with complex conditions, to reduce and manage medication-related problems, such as drug interactions, adverse medication side effects, duplicate medications, and help eliminate unneeded medications. The ministry is supporting this new developmental program with $23 million over three years, and is working with UBC’s faculty of pharmaceutical sciences to manage the program.“Embedding a clinical pharmacist in a patient’s primary-care team reduces the risk of adverse drug reactions, which rises with the complexity of the condition, a patient’s frailty, age and the number of medications prescribed. According to recent figures, over 600,000 British Columbians have a chronic medical condition of medium or high complexity, and 20 percent of those over 70 take at least five or more medications a day.”Through one-on-one patient care, the Ministry says that pharmacists will use their specialized knowledge to optimize their patients’ drug treatments through education and drug regimen adjustments with prescribers. These clinical pharmacists will also be able to promote safer and more appropriate prescribing by reviewing current evidence about different drug options with physicians and nurse practitioners in their team.At the heart of the Province’s new primary health-care strategy is a focus on team-based care that will see government fund these new pharmacist positions, in addition to recruiting 200 family doctors, and 200 nurse practitioners, to provide all British Columbians with faster and improved access to health care. VANCOUVER, B.C. — The Ministry of Health says it will be hiring 50 new clinical pharmacists around the province as part of the new primary-care network teams.Health Minister Adrian Dix announced that the positions are being added as part of government’s new primary health-care strategy to deliver team-based heathcare.“Fully utilizing the expertise of health professions and creating these new clinical pharmacist positions is another crucial step in establishing patient-centred, team-based care that addresses under-met needs, and gaps in care for patients dealing with complex conditions,” said Adrian Dix, Minister of Health.last_img read more

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Kohli looking at Jadeja as 3rd spinner

first_imgNew Delhi: Considered a complete package for the limited-overs cricket, Ravindra Jadeja’s career saw a surprise turn when he was left out of the national team after the ODI against West Indies in July 2017. For close to a year and two months, he was seen as India’s spin weapon in only Test cricket. But the Asia Cup in Dubai last year saw the selectors deciding to give him another chance, and while he is still not the first-choice spinner in this Indian team, he has clearly booked himself a place in the flight for the World Cup. Also Read – Dhoni, Paes spotted playing football togetherSources in the team management who are aware of the developments said his quality performance in the just concluded ODI series against Australia has all but sealed his place in the flight to England for the 2019 World Cup. “Jadeja is very much in the scheme of things. Even if he doesn’t automatically find a place in the XI, his role could be important if the wickets in England are flat and offer a bit of turn, as expected for now. Also, you have to realise that he is your only conventional left-arm spinner in the team and in a long format tournament like the World Cup, you will need him. Also Read – Andy Murray to make Grand Slam return at Australian Open”Also, with Jadeja what you get is an extended lower middle-order. Yes, he might not be scoring runs in every game, but he can definitely wield the willow. Not to forget his brilliance on the field. He is one of those who can easily save 10-15 runs with his pace across the square. In high-pressure games, 10-15 runs can be worth its weight in gold,” the source said. Asked if that meant it was a three-way race for the two spots between Kuldeep Yadav, Jadeja and Yuzvendra Chahal, the source said that was a call that would have to be taken by the coach and captain depending on how they assess the opposition.last_img read more

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Workload management: Rohit, Zaheer tell players to ‘listen’ to their bodies

first_imgMumbai: Offering an advice to the World Cup-bound India players living out of their suitcase for months, opener Rohit Sharma and former pace spearhead Zaheer Khan on Tuesday said: “listen to your body”. The suggestion came amid a debate around the workload management of players, now gearing up for a gruelling Indian Premier League, which will end barely days before the ICC showpiece begins in the United Kingdom on May 30. “It’s going to be challenging as always. We have been on the road for last three or four years. We have played a lot of back to back cricket. It depends on individuals. You should always listen to your body,” Rohit said. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhRohit is leading the Mumbai Indians in the IPL with Zaheer being the team’s Director of cricket operations. “Yes, the World Cup is our priority. The IPL is also one of the biggest tournaments in the world. That is our priority as well. Keeping everything in mind we would take a decision collectively (on workload factor) on each individual,” the swashbuckling batsman said. Zaheer felt that it was up to the individuals to listen to their bodies as far as workload was concerned. “I have always felt it’s an individual call. You have to listen to body and respond. I think we all recognise how important the World Cup is as a tournament and we also understand what the IPL brings to the table — match practice and intensity.”last_img read more

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Modi to address BJP rally in Jammu on Thursday

first_imgJammu: Prime Minister Narendra Modi will address an election rally in the Jammu district on Thursday, a BJP official said here on Tuesday. Avinash Rai Khanna, BJP National Vice President, said the grand start of the party’s election campaign in the region will take place from Modi’s ‘Vijay Sankalp rally’ scheduled to be held in the outskirts of Jammu city at the Doomi panchayat in Bhalwal. According to the official, Modi will seek votes for the two Bharatiya Janata Party candidates — Jugal Kishore Sharma from Jammu and Jitendra Singh from Udhampur — who are seeking re-election. Elections to the Udhampur seat is scheduled on April 11 while voting for Jammu will be held on April 18. Elaborate security arrangements are being made for Modi’s visit. An advance security liaison (ASL) team that protects the Prime Minister has already arrived here.last_img read more

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SSC paper leak case: Apex court allows declaration of re-examination’s result

first_imgNew Delhi: The Supreme Court on Monday allowed the Staff Selection Commission to declare the result of a re-examination of SSC Combined Graduate Level (CGL) 2017 held last year. A bench of Justices S A Bobde and S Abdul Nazeer said that injunction granted on August 31, last year on the declaration of result for SSC CGL, 2017, would not continue on a re-examination conducted on March 9, 2018. The top court said that lakhs of unemployed youths have suffered because someone from the organisation was corrupt. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’It also set up a high powered committee comprising Nandan Nilekani, a co-founder of tech giant Infosys, and renowned computer scientist Vijay P Bhatkar to suggest reforms for conducting of competitive examinations fairly by government bodies. The bench said that it will decide the terms of reference for the high powered committee at the later stage and posted the matter for further hearing on April 9. The examination papers of the SSC CGL 2017 were allegedly leaked, leading to huge protests from job seekers for several days. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KAmid the protests, the Staff Selection Commission (SSC) had recommended a CBI probe into the allegations of paper leak. On August 31, last year, the apex court had stayed the declaration of result of the SSC CGL and Combined Higher Secondary Level (CHSL) Examination held in 2017, in which lakhs of students had appeared, saying it seemed that the entire test and the system was “tainted”. At the outset, the bench Monday asked the Centre to consider re-conducting the 2017 examination as several of the papers were alleged to be tainted. Solicitor General Tushar Mehta, appearing for Centre said that there was no need for re-examination of entire papers as the leak was “extremely localised” and those behind the leaks were identified and action was taken. He said that there was allegation with regard to one paper which was held on February 21, 2018 and the SSC has cancelled that paper and a re-examination was taken on March 9, which was not tainted.last_img read more

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Sealdah Division train services affected for three hours

first_imgKolkata: Train services were suspended in Barasat-Hasnabad section of the Eastern Railway (ER), Sealdah Division, for more than three hours on Thursday morning after a group of people put up a blockade.The demonstration was held after the death of an under-trial prisoner who was arrested on May 3 when passengers were agitating due to the cancellation of trains owing to cyclone Fani. It is alleged that on May 3, during the agitation, the Railway Protection Force (RPF) and the Government Railway Police (GRP) personnel arrested several persons while clearing the line. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaOne Goutam Mondal (24) who was physically challenged was also held. It is alleged that after arresting him, the RPF and GRP personnel beat him up badly. Later, he was sent to judicial custody at Dum Dum Correctional Home after being produced before the concerned court. While staying in the correctional home, he fell ill on Tuesday and was admitted to R G Kar Medical College and Hospital where he died. After the news of his death reached his home, his family members and neighbours were furious. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayAs autopsy was not done and the body has not been handed over to his family members yet, on Thursday morning a blockade was put up in protest of the incident at Lebutala station. Due to this, train services were affected from 7:41 am onwards. Normal train services resumed after the blockade was withdrawn at around 11:20 am. In the meantime, train services were maintained between Barasat and Sondalia on the Up direction and between Hasnabad and Haroa Road station in the Down line. Also, eight local trains including four Up and four Down trains had to be cancelled while eight locals ran late.last_img read more

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Villagers request HSPCB for groundwater test as trash grows in Bandhwari plant

first_imgGurugram: Residents of four villages that includes Gwalpahari, Baliawas, Mandi and Ko— living close to the Bandhwari waste treatment plant have requested the Haryana State Pollution Control Board (HSPCB) to carry out groundwater testing in their areas.The villagers fear that the groundwater — the only source of water for them — has been polluted like it was found to have been in three other villages — Bandhwari, Mangar (Faridabad) and Dera (Delhi) where tests were carried out earlier. Also Read – Odd-Even: CM seeks transport dept’s views on exemption to women, two wheelers, CNG vehicles”As groundwater contamination by leachate has increased manifold in the past two years, we are sure that all surrounding areas, including my village (Gwal Pahari), has been affected. The problem is that most of the residents still rely on groundwater for consumption. We, therefore, demand groundwater testing at the earliest,” said a villager from Gwalpahari, who did not wish to be named. The dumping of more than 1,600 tonnes of mixed waste at the plant, every day, creates a stream of dirty black water, also known as leachate. Also Read – More good air days in Delhi due to Centre’s steps: JavadekarRecently, the National Green Tribunal (NGT) came down heavily on the Haryana government and directed authorities to carry out damage impact study and test groundwater samples in Bandhwari and other surrounding areas. Kuldeep Singh, regional officer, HSPCB (North), said, “We have forwarded the concerns raised by the residents to the CPCB, and the MCG commissioner who can help analyse the previous records (before the plant came up) and present situation. A detailed study has to be carried out by the CPCB, after the NGT directions.” At present more than 1,000 tonnes of garbage from Gurugram and Faridabad is discarded daily at the area that is nestled in the green belt of Aravallis. Based on the proposal, the plant will treat more than 100 kiloliters of leachate daily. It will be set up the Chinese company Eco green that has also been entrusted with the responsibility of recycling the waste in the area into the creation of power and other useful forms. As the layout of the projects, works may begin soon as claimed by certain public officials. Recently in the public meeting, the deputy commissioner of Gurugram instructed officials to ensure that all of the city’s bulk waste generators segregate waste on site and have their own composting units. He also instructed that this model should be replicated on an industrial scale for large manufacturing units, as well as at a panchayat level throughout Gurugram district.last_img read more

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UN Chief Ban: Drug smuggling rises in West Africa

first_imgUnited Nations – $1.25 billion of cocaine passes through West Africa each year, says UN Chief Ban-Ki moon.The UN estimates that $1.25 billion of cocaine is passing through West Africa each year, UN Secretary General Ban Ki–moon said on Thursday in New York. Ban stated that a rising portion of drugs entering West African coasts followed the Sahel route on the way to the Mediterranean. “In a particularly disturbing development, West Africa is no longer just a transit route for drug traffickers but a growing destination with more than a million users of illicit drugs. I urge all member states to ratify and fully implement these conventions and instruments without delay,” Moon said. Ban also stressed that “he also expressed that their work was guided by the conventions against organized crime, drug trafficking and corruption, as well as the international instruments on terrorism, which must be implemented in full compliance with human rights standards and norms.”last_img read more

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Health: 6.54 Million Moroccans Benefited from RAMED

first_imgCasablanca-Around 6.54 million people have benefited from the Medical Insurance Plan for the Financially Underprivileged (RAMED), thus constituting 77% of the estimated 8.5 million eligible people, according to recent statistics revealed by the Ministry of health.These statistics were presented by the Ministry of Health on Thursday, March 13, in Rabat, during a briefing organized on the occasion of the second anniversary of the launching of RAMED.According to daily La Vie Eco, the statistics presented by the Ministry of Health show that the number of applications filed by citizens up to the end of February 2014 have reached 2,693,847 applications, 58% of which are from urban areas and 42% from rural areas. RAMED placed the fight against chronic and costly diseases among the priorities of the national health policy, by implementing a strategy based primarily on the prevention and effective management of patients, in order to reduce the number of deaths and costs of care.The number of patients cared for in 2013 increased compared to 2012. The number of those with chronic renal failure reached 7,300 in 2013 compared to 4285 patients in 2012, and the number of patients diagnosed with cancer in 2013 reached to 14,250 compared to 11,874 in 2012.The number of patients diagnosed with diabetes totaled 529,910, compared to 501,064 patients in 2012, whereas the number of individuals suffering from hypertension reached 360,416 compared to 273,121 patients in 2012. The report presented by the Ministry of Health also highlighted the lack of financial resources to finance the RAMED. Hence, access to medical care provided by public hospitals and university hospitals remains dependent on the contribution of the beneficiaries. According to the same source, RAMED card holders can benefit from care for chronic and costly diseases, laboratory tests and hospitalization, although the law allows them only access to emergency services and medical care.RAMED is a medical insurance plan created in 2012. It aims to assist and allow financially underprivileged citizens to have access to medical care.last_img read more

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After Mentioning ‘Mexico’s Brothels’, Morocco’s Minister clarifies on Twitter

Fez- It seems that Mustapha El Khalfi, Morocco’s Minister of Communication and government spokesman, was either ill-advised or did not realize the seriousness of his words when he compared the high number of soap-operas broadcast TV channel to a “brothel in Mexico.”Three days after his declaration before the parliament on Tuesday, Khalfi found himself in an uncomfortable situation and was forced to use Twitter to clarify what he meant by this phrase when he talked about the Latin American soap operas served to the Moroccan public TV channels.“My statement has been altered. This is what gave rise to an attack on a friendly country Mexico, and this attack is unacceptable,” said El Kahlfi on his Twitter account on Friday. This clarification comes after Mexico formally protested the statement used by the Moroccan Minister, according to Le360.During a session of oral questions at the House of Representatives on Tuesday, Mustapha El Khalfi slammed Moroccan public TV channels for the high number of Mexican soap-operas that 2M and Al Oula broadcast on a daily basis.“We need Moroccan Media; Morocco is not Afghanistan or any other country. The problem is not whether Morocco is like Afghanistan, Sudan or Iran, the problem is that there are those who want to turn Morocco [through serials and movies] into a brothel for Mexico,” he said.This statement risks to cause problem to Morocco’s diplomacy. Mexico is one of the countries that don’t support Morocco’s stance on the Western Sahara dispute and Minister Khalfi words won’t help change things for the better. The question that comes to one’s mind is why the Minister singled out Mexico when it is known that the soap-operas broadcast on Moroccan TV channels are not exclusively Mexicans.It remains to be seen if the Minister will come out of this controversy unscathed. Already some members of the opposition parties have been quick in slamming a statement that “can cost dearly to Morocco at the diplomatic level.”“Mr. El Khalfi’s response went beyond the scope of a government response to an opposition MP. It is a sovereign and a friendly country that is being abused and called into question. The Foreign Minister, Salaheddine Mezouar should react to the words pronounced by his colleague,” Driss Lachgar, Secretary General of the USFP was quoted by Quid.ma as saying.“There is no way one can overlook such words that can cost us diplomatically,” a member of the Party of Authenticity and Modernity (PAM), another opposition party, was quoted by the same source as saying. read more

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