Feanny’s Campesino to capture feature

first_imgHaving finished a good fifth in the $13.9 million Diamond Mile on December 10, CAMPESINO should rebound with a win in the open allowance feature for the St Catherine Cup over 1100 metres at Caymanas Park today.Trained by 14-time champion Philip Feanny for popular owner Howard Hamilton, CAMPESINO will be opposed by six rivals, including the recent winners POLLY B and SIR BUDGET and the highly regarded BLUE DIXIE, who will not find the distance too sharp.CAMPESINO, who shoulders topweight of 57.0kg and will allow weight all around, last won the prestigious Glen Mills Caribbean Sprint Championship over 1200 metres on November 12, clocking the fast time of 1:10.4 in lowering the colours of his fleet-footed stable-companion BUZZ NIGHTMARE.Having beaten the best sprinters in the country that day, a fit CAMPESINO looks the obvious choice. He chased BUZZ NIGHTMARE throughout the backstretch in the Diamond Mile and was not disgraced in finishing fifth going that far.With Robert Halledeen up, the seven-year-old bay gelding by Campadre out of Yaella has the speed to chase POLLY B and SIR BUDGET at close range before taking command from early in the straight. His class should do the rest.Other firm fancies on the nine-race programme are the Anthony ‘Baba’ Nunes-trained RUNALLDAY in the opening race over 1300 metres; JON MARSHALL to stave off CONCLUSION in the third; MISTER BONES under former champion Dane Nelson in the fourth; TWILIGHT STORM in the fifth; and FIERY PATH ahead of STERRI’S CHOICE in the seventh.last_img read more

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Center Songhai Liberia Makes Steady Progress in Revitalization

first_imgIn a bid to enhance agri-business in Liberia, the Center Songhai Liberia (CSL) has made some steady progress in its revitalization program at the entity’s Bensonville’s training center in Montserrado County.This assertion was made on Monday by the National Program Director (NPD) in an exclusive interview with the Daily Observer at the Bensonville head-office of the CSL.Mr. Christopher K. Fayia of the CSL was quick to point out that in order to jumpstart the vital agric-business program, the center needs US$1.7 million dollars to enhance extensive training.CSL’s National Program Director made the disclosure after briefing the Chairperson, Mrs. Clavenda Parker, and her team at the Bensonville Head-office on the operations agric-business training center.Already, Director Fayia disclosed that a huge portion of the CSL’s land had been brushed, burnt and cultivated for the planting of a variety of foods and cash crops.“We are indeed facing daunting challenges and constraints owing to lack of funds to carry out structured plans crafted and designed for the training of Liberian farmers in several economic areas,” Director Fayia asserted.He also disclosed that the CSL Board of Directors is enthusiastic about the economic and logistical empowerment of the agric-business training center in Bensonville, outside Monrovia.Among the crops being planted is the famous and high yielding Nerica-8 rice multiplied at the Central Agriculture Research Institute (CARI) in Suakoko, Bong County.Others crops under cultivation include, corn, beans, okra and many others that are essential needs of Liberians and foreign residents in all parts of the country.Director Fayia intimated that the current program being carried out comes as an initial mobilization of funds by members of the CSL’s Board of Directors and other generous support partners in the country.Some of the funds are being used to rehabilitate the prospective farmers’ dormitories for both men and women for the forth-coming training session at the CSL’s center in Bensonville.Director Fayia also indicated that malfunctioned machines used three years ago for the training of outgoing farmers are been gradually rehabilitated for the up-coming training program at the CSL.At the same time, the Director disclosed that the Center Songhai Liberia’s official activities are now being  handled by the regional Center Songhai in Cotonu, Benin as a matter of ensuring the viability of the program in Liberia in years to come.He described agric-business as critical to Liberia’s socio-economic viability and sustained development, growth and progress in the country.He extended thanks and appreciation to members of Board of Directors and other partners for the level concern and support to the ongoing program being carried out at the CSL in Bensonville.Besides, Director Fayia indicated that Center Songhai Benin has posted two and professional trainers at the Bensonville’s CSL’s training Center in Liberia to buttress the current farming and capacity building initiatives in Liberia.Earlier, during a tour of the current agric-business cultivated farm area, CSL’s Board Chairperson, Madam Clavenda Parker, urged staff and employees of the institution to fast-track the rehabilitation of some machines in order to generate money to run the program.Chairperson Parker underscored the need for the encouragement in the staff and workforce of the CSL in order to ensure efficiency and effective coordination.She promised to communicate and meet senior members of the Liberian Government and other relevant support partners in order to encourage them to place priority on the implementation of CSL’s programs in the country.In closing, Chairperson Parker thanked the staff and employees for their level of commitment in ensuring the initial implementation of the current program at the CSL in Bensonville.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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On Side: Hello EPA, Where Are You?

first_imgBy J. KarbarLiberians are quick to forget, and our temporal newspapers, radio stations and other news media are no exception. They tend to forget the past and speculate about the future. The October elections are some eight months away and with so much speculation surrounding, not even the activities of the “Gboyo” or “heartmen” in the electioneering politics in this country are being warned of in the media.Unsolved and unexplained murders, the controversial and questionable printing of new bank notes, with its accompanying high inflation; the monopolization of theguilt of corrupt officials by her Excellency; and that “dirty disease” EBOLA, have all been forgotten.On our way to town this morning, we were stuck in traffic between Nigeria House and Catholic Hospital Junction. Ours was the outer lane. The acrid scent of brake-shoes burning assailed our senses from the car immediately ahead of us. On the center lane, on the left of the car before us, was a bus with JFK identification marks. At every stop and go, spurts of black-gray smoke comes billowing out its exhaust, forcing us to wind our windows up. Sitting there in traffic sweating, a police car, lights flashing, siren wailings, goes by on the opposite side with a long train of cars following in its wake. Some cars in the center lane pulled out of line and joined the police convoy. The unfairness of it all provoked unfavorable comments in our taxi cab. My concern was the discomfort caused us by the smoking JFK bus and I thought aloud “EPA, where are you? Yor there only for Firestone and other concessions?Where are you, EPA? We are told that our Earth, the magnificent, has endured billions of years of evolution, but that our modern industrial way of life recklessly jeopardizes its future. People in the know point to overpopulation, pollution, the depletion of resources and the destruction of natural habitats as sure signs that there is little time to reverse the destruction. EPA, what are you doing? One has neither seen nor heard of you in the print or electronic media. Must we reach crisis proportions as in India or China before you begin to act, or react? Only the ignorant fools, the blind, and or the selfish will not note how climate change is affecting our lives. As a young boy growing up in Voinjama in the early 60’s, monkeys could be heard and seen swinging overhead as we bathed and swam in the Zeliba River on the road to Sellega – we used to drink that water raw. Today you can’t bathe in it. The same love of swimming made me spend my 1966/67 vacation in West Point because of the proximity of the Vai Town Bridge where we used to jump from the pipeline below into the Mesurado River. That’s not possible today – just look at the number of toilets on the river. In Cape Mount and Nimba, I’ve seen how mines pollute rivers and streams and deprive locals from a major source of protein food, fish. In Grand Gedeh, whole forests are uprooted by gold diggers who change the natural course of a stream to dig the river bed.In Lofa, the surface of the creek that lends its name to the city of Voinjama was rainbow colored by the sun due to a mix of substances dumped in the creek. On one bank of the creek is the Monrovia Parking and car wash. Directly opposite the parking is an automotive garage – no telling what they dump in that little creek. Long ago, I was introduced to the idea that you don’t see what you don’t know. Perhaps the people abusing Voinjeh do not realize they may be poisoning the many wells which line the banks of Voinjeh, their primary source of household water. Because many of us do not see because we do not know the effect of monoculture on natural vegetation and rush to establish rubber and palm farms around our villages, it is about time the GoL through the relevant agencies begin a national Public Awareness Program – the serious erosion taking place in Buchanan, New Kru Town and Virginia should serve as the catalyst…government could begin by legislating a ban on plastic bags.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Celtic will play on in Champions League as Legia Warsaw fail with latest appeal

first_imgCeltic have been cleared to play on in the Champions League.Legia Warsaw were kicked out of the competition, despite their 6-1 aggregate victory over Celtic in the third qualifying round, for fielding an ineligible player in the tie.UEFA awarded the Scottish champions a 3-0 win in the second leg, meaning they went through on away goals, and later rejected Legia’s appeal against that decision.That promoted the Polish club to take their case to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, but they have now turned down their request to be re-admitted to the Champions League.It means Celtic’s play-off against Maribor on Wednesday will now go ahead as planned. 1 Celtic will play on in Champions League as Legia Warsaw fail with latest appeal last_img read more

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Wounded vets must often fight financial battles, too

first_imgHe can’t even look at the framed photograph that shows him accepting a Marine heroism medal for his recovery work at the Pentagon after the terrorist attack. It might remind him of the burned woman whose skin peeled off in his hands when he tried to comfort her. He tries not to hear the shrieking rockets of Iraq either, smell the burning fuel, or relive the blast that blew him right out of bed. The memories come steamrolling back anyway. “Nothing can turn off those things,” he says, voice choked and eyes glistening. He stews alternately over suicide and finances, his $43,000 in credit-card debt, his $4,330 in federal checks each month. They bring the government’s compensation for total disability from post-traumatic stress disorder. His flashbacks, thoughts of suicide, and anxiety over imagined threats – all documented for six years in his military record – keep him from working. The disability payments don’t even cover the $5,700-a-month cost of his adjustable home mortgage and equity loans. He owes more on his house than its market value, so he can’t sell it and may soon lose it to the bank. “I love this house. It makes me feel safe,” he says. Awad could once afford it. He used to earn $100,000 a year as an experienced Marine with a master’s degree in management who excelled at logistics. Now, he can’t even manage his own life. There’s another twist. This dedicated Marine was given a “general” discharge 15 months ago for an extramarital affair with a woman, also a Marine. His military therapists blamed this impulsive conduct on PTSD aggravated by his Middle East tours. Luckily, his discharge, though not unqualifiedly honorable, left his rights intact to medical care and disability payments – or he’d be in sadder shape. Divorced since developing PTSD, Awad has two daughters who live elsewhere. He spends much of his days hoisting weights and thwacking a punching bag in the dimness of his garage. He passes nights largely sleepless, a zombie shuffling through the bare rooms of his home in sunny California wine country, not too far from his old base. Few anticipated the high price of caring for Awad and other Middle East veterans with deep, slow-healing wounds. Afghanistan seemed quiet and Saddam Hussein still ruled Iraq one year after the Sept. 11 attacks. That’s when the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs guaranteed two years of free care to returning combat veterans for virtually any medical condition with a possible service link. Later, few predicted such a protracted war in Iraq, one in which Iraqi insurgents would rely on disfiguring bombs and bombardment as chief tactics. Better armor and field medicine have kept U.S. soldiers alive at the highest rate ever, according to one study based on government data. However, many are returning with multiple amputations or other disabling injuries. The Pentagon counts more than 29,000 combat wounded in the Middle East since the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington. Tens of thousands more got hurt outside of combat or in ways that only surface later. There was no mistaking the injuries of Cambodian-American Sgt. Pisey Tan. Eight months into his second tour in Iraq, a makeshift bomb blasted his armored vehicle and took both his legs. Still, Tan has had to rely on private donations and family, as well as government. The government treated him and paid for his artificial legs. But his brother, Dada, left college to live with him at a military hospital for almost a year. “That’s how our family is,” says the Woodlyn, Pa., veteran. “We always take care of our own.” The government says it does too, and with some truth. Of 1.4 million U.S. forces deployed for Iraq and Afghanistan, more than 185,000 have sought care from the VA – a number that could easily top 700,000 eventually, predicts one academic analysis. But many also need to help themselves. Iraq veteran John Waltz of Hebron, Ky., sought treatment for PTSD but ran up about $12,000 worth of medical bills while his condition and claim were evaluated, he says. “We have to be really frugal, as far as what groceries we buy,” Waltz says. “I think we’re down to just a couple dollars now, until the next time we get paid.” On a national scale, the costs of caring for the wounded certainly won’t crush the immense American economy or the VA. But the price tag will challenge budgets of governments and service agencies, adding another hungry mouth within their nests. Economic forecasts vary widely for the federal costs of caring for injured veterans returning from the Middle East, but they range as high as $700 billion for the VA. That would rival the cost of fighting the Iraq war. In recent years, the VA has repeatedly run out of money to treat sick veterans and had to ask for billions more before the next budget. “I wouldn’t be surprised if these costs per person are higher than any war previously,” says Scott Wallsten, of the conservative think tank Progress and Freedom Foundation. Federal officials generally defend the quality of care. At a recent ribbon cutting, the Army’s vice chief of staff, Gen. Richard Cody, trumpeted a new rehab center for amputees as “proof that when it comes to making good on such an important promise, there is no bottom line.” White House budget spokesman Sean Kevelighan says medical spending for all veterans has risen by 83 percent during President George W. Bush’s time in office. “The president has made his dedication very clear to troops in the field and after,” Kevelighan says. The VA didn’t respond to several requests for comment. Recently, though, outgoing chief Jim Nicholson acknowledged trouble keeping up with the pace of disability claims. But earlier this year, he also insisted that veterans “will invariably tell you they are really getting good care from the VA.” Not invariably. The VA takes the lead in treating wounds and paying for disabilities of veterans. And it usually does a good job of handling major, known wounds, especially in the early months, by many accounts. However, many veterans and families say the VA often restricts rehabilitation or cuts it off too quickly. Denise Mettie of Selah, Wash., says she fought successfully for VA funds to rehabilitate her brain-damaged son, an Iraq veteran, in a private hospital where he was given five times more therapy. But she’s been living “paycheck to paycheck” to cover travel to his bedside and other costs of his care. A presidential commission has also recommended broader disability compensation for lost quality of life. Some wounded veterans turn to private health insurance and other programs outside the federal government, swelling costs also for states and towns. Service nonprofits also pay for housing, food, clothing and transportation for wounded veterans. Veterans groups sued the VA a few months ago, seeking quicker care and disability payments for those with PTSD. They claim that the crush of shattered troops has sent the agency into a “virtual meltdown.” This past week, the VA challenged the lawsuit on technical grounds. Its lawyers also argued that even though VA rules commit to two years of free care, that depends upon Congress setting aside enough money. Many recommendations for fixes involve quicker and heftier disability benefits. And nearly everyone begs for more VA money and staff for medical treatment. But it may be too late for veterans like Awad, as he nervously awaits the approach of imagined enemies around what was once his castle.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! TEMECULA – He was one of America’s first defenders on Sept. 11, 2001, a Marine who pulled burned bodies from the ruins of the Pentagon. He saw more horrors in Kuwait and Iraq. Today, he can’t keep a job, pay his bills, or chase thoughts of suicide from his tortured brain. In a few weeks, he may lose his house, too. Gamal Awad – the American son of a Sudanese immigrant – exemplifies an emerging group of war veterans: the economic casualties. More than in past wars, many wounded troops are coming home alive from the Middle East, a triumph for military medicine. But they often return hobbled by prolonged physical and mental injuries from homemade bombs and the anxiety of fighting a hidden enemy along blurred battle lines. These troops are just starting to seek help in large numbers, more than 185,000 so far. The cost of their benefits is already testing resources set aside by government and threatening the future of these wounded veterans for decades to come, say economists and veterans groups. “The wounded and their families no longer trust that the government will take care of them the way they thought they’d be taken care of,” says veterans advocate Mary Ellen Salzano. How does a war veteran expect to be treated? “As a hero,” she says. In Awad’s case, he needs to think of a reason each morning not to kill himself. last_img read more

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‘We should know about that, shouldn’t we?’ – Dortmund respond to Man City rumour

first_img3 Ilkay Gundogan (centre) has been linked with a move to Man City Sport responded by publishing the story again, but at least they let the club know this time… Borussia Dortmund have responded to reports Ilkay Gundogan is on his way out of the Westfalenstadion.In Spain it is said the player has opted against joining Barcelona and will instead join Man City when Pep Guardiola takes over as manager.But on Twitter Dortmund said they have heard nothing about the rumour surrounding the 25-year-old’s future.center_img 3 3last_img read more

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THEY ‘ROCKED THE BOAT’ BUT NOT THE WORLD RECORD!

first_imgThey rocked Rossnowlagh but they didn’t rock the record.An attempt to break the Guinness World Record for the most number of people doing Rock The Boat failed today. But organisers say they were delighted by the amount of money raised for the fight against Irish Breast Cancer.In the end a whopping 896 people turned up for the massive Rock The Boat attempt on Rossnowlagh Beach.The record stood at more than 1,700 and organisers had been hoping that more than 2,000 souls would turn up.Despite not breaking the record, organiser Louis McGlinchey said they were delighted by the first attempt and have not ruled out plans for anther attempt next year! She told Donegal Daily “We were a bit disheartened by not breaking the record but we had a great day.“If we had have got blistering sunshine then we would have smashed the record but you’re not guaranteed that in Donegal.“We raised plenty of money and that was the main aim so it was a success in that way.“Perhaps we’ll get better weather next summer and give it another go then.”ALL PHOTOS BY KIND PERMISSION OF TONY NEETHEY ‘ROCKED THE BOAT’ BUT NOT THE WORLD RECORD! was last modified: August 25th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Rock The BoatRossnowlaghworld recordlast_img read more

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Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgTUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Information and location: Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Business Network International B2 Bombers chapter will meet, 12:15 p.m. at Eduardo’s restaurant, 819 W. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 609-1288 or e-mail audmill@qnet.com. The organization’s Web site is at www.bni-scav.com. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. WEDNESDAY Moms Club of Palmdale-West will host a fundraising dinner, 5-8:30 at Vince’s Pasta & Pizza, 2833 W. Ave. L, Lancaster. Mention MOMS Club of Palmdale-West when ordering and a portion of the total bill will be donated to the MOMS Club. Money raised will be donated to St. Joseph’s Manor, which offers needy and abandoned mothers and their children care and shelter. Call (661) 280-7128. Emotional Freedom Technique for pain relief weekly demonstrations, 6:30-7:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends), Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE‘Mame,’ ‘Hello, Dolly!’ composer Jerry Herman dies at 88160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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DEPUTY THOMAS PRINGLE’S PARLIAMENTARY ASSISTANT CLAIMS SHE WAS UNFAIRLY DISMISSED

first_imgA woman employed as a parliamentary assistant to Independent TD Thomas Pringle has claimed she was unfairly dismissed.Joan Blackbyrne is taking a case against the Killybegs politician and the Houses of the Oireachtas. Counsel for the Houses of the Oireachtas has claimed Ms Blackbyrne was an employee of Mr Pringle only.Ms Blackbyrne began work as parliamentary assistant to former Kerry South TD Jackie Healy-Rae in March 2001. Initially taken on to cover a six-week period of sick leave, she was not told to leave. She did not sign a contract.The Irish Times report that Mr Healy Rae had told her that in addition to his parliamentary secretary and his son Michael who was his parliamentary assistant, she would remain as “the extra person”, she said. Ms Blackbyrne said she “didn’t know of any other TDs that had three people”.Ms Blackbyrne told the inquiry that prior to the general election in 2002, she asked Mr Healy-Rae what would happen if he wasn’t re-elected.“He said, ‘I don’t know if I’ll get elected. If I was you, I’d stay working, they won’t be long telling you if they don’t want you’. So I stayed working there.” Mr Healy-Rae was re-elected and Ms Blackbyrne continued to work for him until 2011.Ms Blackbyrne recalled receiving a phone call from the Houses of the Oireachtas personnel department in 2003. “They realised that I’d been working there. They hadn’t realised it. They sent me an employment contract.”When Michael Healy-Rae took his father’s seat in 2011, appointing his brother Danny as his parliamentary assistant, Ms Blackbyrne said Michael Healy-Rae told her she could not stay on. Hearing that Thomas Pringle needed a parliamentary assistant, she approached him, was interviewed and was offered the job.Ms Blackbyrne signed an employment contract in April 2011. She said she was told by the Houses of the Oireachtas personnel department that she would lose four weeks wages if she did not sign it within a month.Ms Blackbyrne said as the Houses of the Oireachtas paid her wages, she thought that it was her employer and that her employment with them had been continuous since 2001. Ms Blackbyrne said she and Mr Pringle “got on very well”. In November that year, she fell over wires on the office floor and Mr Pringle brought her to hospital.Ms Blackbyrne said she knew Mr Pringle “wasn’t pleased” when she told him she would have to take sick leave. She said she received a Christmas card from him on December 16th, enclosed in which were expenses owed to her and “a little bit extra for Christmas”. She said she was “completely devastated” when days later the TD sent her a letter of termination.Phoning the Houses of the Oireachtas personnel department, she was told that Mr Pringle could terminate her contract if he wanted to and there was nothing it could do.“I wanted someone to say I should not have been dismissed”, Ms Blackbyrne told the tribunal tearfully. “I should not have been sacked or dismissed like that.” Mr McGreal put it to Ms Blackbyrne that the fact that she had approached Mr Pringle for the job, had been interviewed by him and her employment contract named him as her employer suggested that he was her employer, not the Houses of the Oireachtas.Solicitor for Ms Blackbyrne, Brendan Frawley of Kennedy Solicitors, said Mr Jackie Healy-Rae had “abdicated responsibility for either dismissing her or keeping her on by telling her to keep her head down and she would be kept on”.Mr Frawley said that if the tribunal found the Houses of the Oireachtas to be her employer, he was seeking that they re-employ her. If she was remained unable to work on health grounds, he said, she should be retired on health grounds.The hearing resumes in December.DEPUTY THOMAS PRINGLE’S PARLIAMENTARY ASSISTANT CLAIMS SHE WAS UNFAIRLY DISMISSED was last modified: June 19th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:dailKillybegsparliamentary assistantThomas Pringleunfairly dismissedlast_img read more

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New-look Warriors: Myers, Kerr say they’re excited for something different

first_imgGone may be the expectations of a near-certain path to the NBA Finals for the Warriors, but there was still a palpable sense of excitement exuding from both general manager Bob Myers and coach Steve Kerr at media day.Their unfettered enthusiasm flies in the face of the Warriors’ daunting challenge of trying to keep on winning after losing players who’d won a combined 14 NBA Championship rings here between them.Moving on were Kevin Durant, Andre Iguodala, Shaun Livingston and four others who …last_img read more

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