Paul Desiderio ready to bring ‘Atin to’ fire to Blackwater

first_imgGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:11Top Pentagon general: US maintains ‘high levels of readiness’ regarding N. Korea02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra Philippine Army to acquire MANPADS, self-propelled howitzers Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history The Batang Pier will be spearheaded by Stanley Pringle, who will carry some sort of a chip in his shoulder after finishing second to June Mar Fajardo of San Miguel Beer in the race for the MVP trophy.Fajardo won his fifth straight MVP during last Sunday’s Leo Awards that preeded the opening ceremonies of the 44th season of the league.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ MOST READ But he feels little pressure. What he embraces is the challenge.“At this point, all I really want to gain is the experience,” Desiderio told the Inquirer during the recent PBA media day.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissHe knows he has to find his niche in Blackwater coach Bong Ramos’ system, a search that should be easier after the Elite dealt away Paul Zamar.Desiderio fits the Zamar profile. He is a gutsy playmaker who isn’t afraid to take shots. Even when he isn’t making them, he has enough self -faith to call game winners, an aspect of his personality that gave rise to the #AtinTo movement inside the Diliman campus. In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college For someone picked fourth in a draft that was supposedly lacking in depth, Paul Desiderio will have some of the spotlight trained on him.Most of it will be residue sheen from his stint with University of the Philippines in the UAAP, where he ended a career that took on folk hero proportions when he led the Maroons to their first Finals stint in decades.ADVERTISEMENT Teary Victoria Azarenka admits to struggling after loss in Australia Now if he can only earn the minutes to prove he can knock down big-time shots in the pros.“I spoke with coach Bong and he told me I will get my chance to prove myself,” Desiderio said in Filipino.He promises he hasn’t loss an ounce of the confidence and swagger that endeared him to a school that finally crawled out of collegiate basketball’s underbelly.“I’m going to be the same players,” said Desiderio. “What Blackwater is going through is the same as what UP went through when I was there. So I’m going to do my best to do with Blackwater what I helped achieve in UP.”Blackwater will unveil Desiderio at 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum, where the Elite make their Philippine Cup debut against NorthPort.ADVERTISEMENT View commentslast_img read more

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Egypt fans hope for more Salah magic as season starts

first_img“We used to struggle to find places to watch Liverpool play,” die-hard Reds fan Seif Mahdi, 18, told AFP.“But now everywhere shows it — you just have to tell them you want to watch Salah play.”The reason for the excitement is obvious — last season the Egyptian star smashed a string of records as he scored 44 goals for his English club.Those performances propelled Salah into the elite of world football and helped cement his status as an icon back home.Now his image stares down at the inhabitants of Cairo from adverts plastered along the traffic-clogged streets of the capital city.His popularity has also helped turn Liverpool from a team few Egyptians knew much about to the most talked about foreign club in this country of some 100 million people.That’s a strange feeling for the Liverpool fan club members who cheered on the team long before Salah’s arrival.The supporters association in Egypt now boasts over 12,000 members.“Before, I was unique and special when I told people who I supported,” said business student Omar Nabil, 24.“But now Egyptians are really supporting Liverpool.”– Shirts sold out –Sports shop owner Karim Nasr has seen the surge in Liverpool’s popularity first hand.At his store in the Cairo district of Maadi, the club’s shirts are the only ones that have run out of stock.“Over the summer months we sold more than 1,000 of them,” he said.“And everyday we are getting requests for the new shirt that we are still waiting to receive in the shop.”Right now, Egyptian football fans might be in need of a pick up after a summer that once looked so promising turned out to be highly forgettable.After qualifying for the World Cup for the first time in 28 years hopes were high that Salah could help them make an impact in Russia.But a devastating injury in the Champions League final left Salah unfit and Egypt eventually crashed out after three losses.“People felt huge expectation for the World Cup and so were very disappointed,” said Hatem Maher, sports editor at Ahram Online website.“There was even some criticism of Salah, which is rare, but this has faded now and people are excited about the new season.”After watching the opening game of the new campaign, the Liverpool fans at the Cairo cafe were even more hopeful that their man could repeat the feats of last term.And maybe even go one better — by helping Liverpool finally win the Premier League title.Salah tapped in the club’s first goal of the season to set his team on its way to a comfortable 4-0 victory over West Ham.“He’s not a one-season wonder — he is top class,” said Liverpool fan Mahdi.“Who knows, maybe he will do it again.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Mohamed Salah scored 44 goals for Liverpool last season in a remarkable first campaign for the Egypt star at Anfield © AFP / Oli SCARFFCAIRO, Egypt, Aug 12 – As Mohamed Salah took to the field for the start of the new Premier League season, fans in his native Egypt prayed Sunday for another miracle campaign from the talismanic striker.Two dozen members of the local Liverpool supporters club gathered in a Cairo cafe to clap, cheer and celebrate as their hero got off to a winning start some 4,000 kilometres (2,500 miles) away.last_img read more

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GAA NEWS: BUNCRANA CLUB NOTES

first_imgCongratulations: Congratulations to Eimear Clerkin and Abaigh Stokes who were part of the winning Donegal team that beat Fermanagh in a very tight and competitive game in Fermanagh on Saturday, final score 3-09 to 3-05.Congratulations also to C.L.G. Bun Cranncha’s Peter McLaughlin, Darrach O’Connor, Bruce Waldron and John Campbell part of the Donegal Minor squad that defeated Derry in McCumhaill Park on Saturday.Good luck to Darrach O’Connor and his Donegal teammates in the Ulster under 21 Final on Wednesday evening, when they will face Cavan in Brewster Park, Enniskillen. Good luck Darrach from C.L.G. Bun Cranncha and all in the parish of Buncrana. U12 Blitz: Buncrana CLG hosted an U12 blitz on Saturday 6th April. There was over 200 children in attendance with both A and B competitions. Some of the teams in attendance included teams from St. Eunan’s, Glenties, Termon, St. Paul’s Belfast and Buncrana. Thanks to all who attended and congratulations to the organisers on such a successful event.Senior and Reserve Football: Our Senior and Reserve sides will face Intermediate Champions Termon on Sunday 14th April at 1;30pm and 3:00pm in Termon. Training continues on Tuesday at 7;30pm and Friday at 8:00pm.Girls Football: Girls football training is on Monday night at 7.00pm sharp. Open to all girls from the ages of 9 to 16 years of age. New players are also welcome. Please bring your own water bottle. Well done to the U16 Footballers who beat Killygordan last week 7-05 to 2-01.U5 and U6 Gaelic Games: Under 5s and 6s sessions continues on Saturday mornings at 11.15am sharp in Crana College. The sessions are based on GAA Fundamentals; a Croke Park initiative based on European wide research aimed at bettering your child’s coordination (including hand eye) balance, agility and basic fitness in a fun filled environment. U8 Hurling: U8 Hurling will continue on Wednesdays at 5.30-6.30pm in Crana College. Newcomers are always welcome to come along and learn the basic skills of Hurling in a fun, safe environment.U8 Football: U8 Football will continue on Friday at 6.30pm, new members are always welcome.U9 Football: U9 Football (for children born in 2004) is on every Thursday in Crana College from 7pm-8pm. New players are always welcome.U12 Football: The training times are as follows: Tuesday 7.00-8.00pm and Friday 7.00-8.30pm. Mouthguards are now compulsory for all training as well as matches. Newcomers are always welcome to come along and learn the basic skills of Gaelic football in a fun, safe environment.Club Notes: Anyone who would like to receive a copy of the weekly club notes should email Oisín at buncrana.pro@gmail.com to be included on the mailing list. If you have any items which you think should be included in the club’s weekly notes, please email Oisín at buncrana.pro@gmail.com by 6pm on each Sunday for consideration. To keep up to date with all the latest goings-on, please join us on www.facebook.com/buncranagaa or www.twitter.com/buncranagaa @buncranagaa, or visit our website www.buncranagaa.com. GAA NEWS: BUNCRANA CLUB NOTES was last modified: April 8th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:buncrana gaa club noteslast_img read more

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Epic underground Owey lake earns top spot on list of Earth’s most amazing places

first_imgA mesmerising ‘lake beneath a lake’ off the coast of Donegal has been named No1 on Red Bull’s list of the world’s most amazing places. An extreme explorer’s blog by Red Bull has discovered the nine most incredible underground lakes on the planet, with Owey Island Lake rising to the top of the pack.Owey Island Underground Lake. Image: Iain MillerIt must be seen to be believed, but considering the dangerous descent and complete darkness beneath, we can be thankful that there is video footage to admire the lake from home. Intrepid explorer Iain Miller of Unique Ascent filmed the lake and Pool of Tranquility off West Donegal in March 2017. See the video below.The lake beneath a lake lies 50m below a regular surface lake on the island. A steep and narrow descent makes way for an underground beach and a stunning bioluminescent cave. A paddle into the unknown leads to a Pool of Tranquility, which Iain describes as “a place of complete darkness with no natural light and a surreal haunting silence.”“There is nowhere else like this in Ireland and it is pretty much unknown outside of a handful of people,” Iain told Donegal Daily after his descent last year. The Red Bull blog is sure to bring due recognition to this otherworldly corner of Donegal and perhaps inspire some visitors to check out Owey Island. The more daring adventurers can check out Iain’s blog on the descent here: uniqueascent.ie/the_underground_lakeEpic underground Owey lake earns top spot on list of Earth’s most amazing places was last modified: April 21st, 2018 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Iain Millerlake beneath a lakeOwey IslandRed Bullunderground lakelast_img read more

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More Youth on Titan

first_imgHopes that Saturn’s giant moon Titan might have volcanoes just dropped.  A new paper in Icarus1 concludes Titan gets its geology from the outside, not the inside.  If confirmed, it implies all the surface features were created by wind, impacts and weather – not by active geology.  The hopeful cryovolcano announced last year (Sotra Facula, see 12/24/2010, bullet 12) was disputed by Moore and Pappalardo, authors of the new paper.  Titan may be a geologically dead world.    Titan’s atmosphere, however, remains a subject of intense interest.  Scientists were eager to visit Titan via Cassini because of its thick atmosphere of nitrogen and methane.  Because precipitation of methane and its byproducts was considered inevitable, astrobiologists were eager to find liquid as possible abodes for life.  Some proposed a global ocean several kilometers deep.  When the Huygens Probe landed in January 2005 with a thud on a moist but mostly dry lake bed, those hopes evaporated.    Planetary scientists have also had an age conundrum with Titan.  They know that the methane in the atmosphere is destroyed and converted to other compounds in a one-way process.  This puts strong upper limits on the age of the atmosphere – far less than the 4.5-billion-year age assumed for the solar system.  They had hoped that a reservoir of methane under the surface would be found to erupt in cryovolcanos to replenish the atmosphere.  The new paper casts doubt on that solution; see the Cassini press release for a summary of the findings, and also PhysOrg, Science Daily.    Instead of volcanoes, another possible large crater has been found.  The “ghost crater” reported by New Scientist is disputed by others.  The surprising dearth of volcanoes leads many planetary scientists to say they are quickly erased by erosion.  If it weren’t for the atmosphere, scientists expect Titan would look like Callisto, a dead moon orbiting Jupiter.    Another paper in press in Icarus analyzed Titan’s equatorial sand dunes.2  The longitudinal dunes, covering about 12.5% of the surface, were a surprise when discovered, because scientists were expecting large lakes or even a global ocean.  They had also doubted that the winds were strong enough at the surface to move particles around.  Dunes also exist on Mars, Venus, and of course, Earth, but on Titan, the average 300-foot-high dunes are nearly 3 km apart, getting farther apart at higher latitudes.  Unlike the silica sands on Earth, the particles in Titan’s dunes are thought to be composed of hydrocarbon dust and ice precipitated out of the atmosphere.  All together, they constitute the largest known reservoir of organics on Titan, because the combined area of dunes is about as large as the United States (Titan’s diameter is also about that size).    The dunes also impinge on theories of Titan’s age.  For one, they are among Titan’s most youthful features; for another, they indicate a lack of persistent liquid on Titan’s equator, even though liquid ethane should have been raining onto the surface throughout Titan’s history.  The presence of dunes implies that much of Titan is arid.  If spread out evenly over the globe, the particles in this largest reservoir of organics (larger than all the observed lakes combined) would doubtless fail to cover Titan with the predicted accumulation of hydrocarbons that must have been produced in the assumed 4.5-billion-year age of the moon.  “The dune distribution places constraints on Titan’s meteorology and geology,” the authors said.1.  Jeffrey M. Moore and Robert T. Pappalardo, “Titan: An Exogenic World?”, Icarus April 2011, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.01.019.2.  LeGall, Janssen et al., “Cassini SAR, radiometry, scatterometry and altimetry observations of Titan’s dune fields,” Icarus (article in press), doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.03.026.We are still discovering facts about Titan, so definitive conclusions are premature; however, enough is known to falsify many assumptions and predictions made by those who refuse to budge from their A.S.S. (age of the solar system, 4.5 billion years; see 02/19/2011).  They were wrong about a global ocean; they were wrong about huge lakes of liquid ethane; they were dumbfounded to find sand dunes; and now it appears they were wrong about active geology.    The upper limits on age appear to be growing stronger with time.  The puzzlement on their faces, and the silence about defending the consensus age, are tell-tale signs that their fascination with discovery is tempered by panic over looming destruction of favored beliefs about the age of the solar system (02/15/2008).  Titan may be the old-agers’ Titanic.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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New ‘Missing Link’ Claim Imagines Human Face on a Fish

first_img(Visited 52 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The Darwin-drenched phrase “missing link” popped up again, this time in a story that claims humans got their faces from a fish.“Extraordinary ‘missing link’ fossil fish found in China” (PhysOrg).“Scientist hails ‘jaw-dropping’ fish fossil discovery” (BBC News).“Fish fossil suggests our skeleton evolved face first” (New Scientist).OK, what’s up with that?  It needs to be “spectacular” to be “news,” so reporters tend to make everything eye-grabbing with words like “extraordinary” and “jaw-dropping,” but this one by John Long (The Conversation) got a little over the top:A spectacular new “missing link” fossil has been unearthed in China. The 419 million year old armoured fish, called Entelognathus, meaning “complete jaw” solves an age-old debate in science. For palaeontologists this fish is as big as finding the Higgs-Boson particle because of its immense significance to our understanding of early vertebrate evolution.This is arguably one of the most exciting fossil discoveries in the past century since Archaeopteryx, the first fossil to bridge the gap between dinosaurs and birds.After soaking the articles in an acid bath to dissolve away the hype, what is left?  John Long’s Conversation piece seems largely a screed against creationists (“those minority groups within society who for some or other reason do not believe in evolution”), so we must look elsewhere for the data.They’re calling it Entelognathus (“complete jaw”), and claiming it resolves an old debate whether placoderms were the ancestors of bony fish and cartilaginous fish.  Its evolutionary value, though, is tempered with some upset: “This is an unexpected discovery that inverts schoolbook teaching on the evolution of bony skulls,” the BBC News said.“Up until now it had been thought that the anatomical peculiarities of bony fishes – the group that would eventually give rise to human beings – are specialisations that arose later in vertebrate evolutionary history in our own bony fish lineage.”“But now that narrative has been turned on its head.“Under their own admission, they are talking about a narrative – not necessarily a fact of science.  The value of an upside-down narrative looks dubious.  John Long presented the impression of a virtually seamless fossil transitional sequence that makes the term “missing link” a misnomer.  Why, then, did the BBC say this?Scientists say that the evolution of jaws is one of the key episodes in the evolution of vertebrates, but the gap between jawed and jawless vertebrates is so large that it is hard to work out the individual evolutionary steps in the transition.It appears that all Entelognathus shows is that some bony fish traits appeared in this placoderm, making their appearance earlier than expected.  It does not say how an unguided process of mutations produced things as complex as multi-boned jaws, semicircular canals in the ears, and copulatory organs.  Moreover, this fossil cannot explain the cartilaginous fish:Dr Friedman says that the fossil adds weight to the theory that many classic bony fish features were evolved “very deep in our family tree, before bony fish split from sharks”.“This means that we – as in bony fishes – are the ones who have held on to more ancient structures, while it is the sharks that have gone off and done something new and interesting in an evolutionary sense.In other words, the expectation that placoderms were “primitive” has been deflated (see New Scientist).  In addition, sharks and rays can not be considered primitive, either.  So now, evolutionists have two problems when there were one: (1) how Entelognathus got “many classic bony fish features” by mutations and selection, and (2) how sharks did something “new and interesting in an evolutionary sense” (if one pardons the oxymoron).  “It challenges the way we think about the evolution of modern skeletons,” New Scientist says.“The work further reshuffles the deep identities of living groups, revising the deep tree of modern vertebrate groups – including our own remote ancestry,” says Michael Coates at the University of Chicago.So despite John Long’s over-the-top rhetoric which he banged on the heads of evolution skeptics, other scientists appear to see this fossil as a kind of good-news, bad-news joke for Darwinism.  Nature News calls it a “piscine mash-up,” i.e., an unexpected mosaic of traits.  Earlier evolutionists got it all wrong; now it’s time to overcome inertia, clean up and start over:This inversion of a classic scenario in vertebrate evolution raises an obvious question: how did we get it so wrong? The status of sharks as surrogate ancestors seems well established, but this is an illusion of dogmatic repetition combined with spurious portrayals of present-day cartilaginous fishes as unchanged ‘living fossils’. The popular model of a shark-like ancestor is, in the end, more a hangover of the ‘great chain of being’ of ancient philosophy and pre-Darwinian archetypes than a product of modern comparative biology and phylogenetic ‘tree thinking’. Added to this conceptual inertia is a historically compartmentalized approach to studying early vertebrate groups that made it too easy to dismiss shared similarities — the head and shoulder exoskeleton of placoderms and bony fishes, for example — as independent innovations without adequate evidence.Over the past decade or so, new fossilsand re-examinations of old ones have forced palaeontologists to look beyond the confines of traditional classifications and reconsider the coherence of textbook assemblages such as placoderms and acanthodians, and their relationships to extant gnathostomes. Perhaps more than any of these discoveries, Entelognathus demands a major rethink of where fossils fit relative to modern lineages, and how these living groups came to acquire their characteristic traits. It will take time to fully digest the implications of such a remarkable fossil, but it is clear that a major reframing of our understanding of early gnathostome evolution is now in full swing.Any major reframing of understanding presupposes what passed for understanding in the past was very poorly framed.  Mr. Long, though, ended his article celebrating his new hero:For me the really exciting thing about Entelognathus is that even in the 21st century palaeontologists are still making really big discoveries that fill in major missing gaps in our knowledge about the evolution of the modern fauna.All fossils touted as “missing links” are contentious to some, those minority groups within society who for some or other reason do not believe in evolution. For these people news of Entelognathus will be challenging, but most will simply ignore it as it doesn’t abide with their world view.Yet all of these disbelievers still rely on evolution in their daily lives, as new vaccines and antibiotics or new crops bred to withstand environmental extremes to feed us, are all advances in science underpinned by evolutionary principals [sic].So believe it or not, evolution is helping everyone one of us on the planet, every day to live better lives. Thanks Entelognathus, you’re a real hero.The paper by Min Zhu et al., published by Nature, was significantly more cautious in its interpretation: e.g., “A phylogenetic analysis places the new form near the top of the gnathostome stem group but does not fully resolve its relationships to other placoderms.”  The authors did not explicitly state where the fossil was found, who found it, what condition it was in, or how it was dated.Isn’t it uncanny how all the Darwin-imprimatur outlets get the artwork simultaneously?  The artist renditions are drawn to favor the evolutionary story.  This time they gave the fish a practically human face.  All it needs is a caption, saying, “Me fish obeying Charlie, evolving human num-nums.”  Good grief.Coming from China, this fossil needs a good looking over by independent authorities, to ensure some peasant didn’t glue a bony fish head onto a placoderm body.  Even assuming it is fully authentic, nothing about this specimen looks primitive.  It doesn’t help evolutionists, either, despite Mr. Long’s rush to judgment.  Who is ignoring it?  Who is finding this fossil at odds with his world view?  Darwine does strange things to the mind, especially in the upside-down position.last_img read more

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Govt buildings to go ‘green’

first_img23 July 2003The government will save millions of rands on electricity bills once its buildings have been upgraded and connected to various energy-saving technologies.In a move to relieve growing energy demands on Eskom, the electricity utility’s head, Thulani Gcabashe, on Tuesday handed a R20-million cheque to Minerals and Energy Minister Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka to use in introducing government departments to energy-efficient technologies.Already, the department of minerals and energy, the National Electricity Regulator and Eskom are said to be saving more than R1-million per annum on electricity by using a lighting system that is energy-efficient.In terms of the new move, authorities will replace all incandescent lamps in government buildings with compact fluorescent lamps over the next few weeks as part of the campaign to make government buildings “green”.Compact fluorescent bulbs are said to be up to 80 percent more efficient than the conventional incandescent type.According to the Minerals and Energy department, a countrywide efficient lighting programme could save 4.8Gl (4.8 billion litres) of water annually. Carbon dioxide emissions would be reduced by 3.6Mt (3.6 thousand tons) per year, and other pollutants would be reduced significantly.Speaking in Pretoria on Tuesday, Gcabashe said Parliament in Cape Town and the Union Buildings in Pretoria would be the first to have the environmentally friendly lighting installed.Gcabashe said the minerals and energy department would use the money to conduct a full energy audit in the Union Buildings.“The more energy we use, the more energy needs to be generated. The result is that more power stations need to be built, which will inevitably result in the consumer having to bear the cost,” he added.It is feared that Eskom’s excess peaking load capacity, based on the average 2.5 percent annual increase in demand, will be depleted by 2007. Even the daily demand will exceed current capacity by 2010.This could have serious consequences for the economy, as the energy sector contributes 15 percent per annum to the gross domestic product and employs more than 250 000 people.As a first step towards addressing the challenge, Eskom is focusing on energy-efficiency programmes to reduce consumption levels, including exploring options such as clean energy and renewable sources of energy.Mlambo-Ngcuka said her department is considering introducing laws to compel manufacturers of electrical products to carry an advisory note informing consumers on ways to operate their household appliances using energy as efficiently as possible.“The efficient use of our existing energy resources must become a way of life for South Africa”, she said.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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SA investment incentives portal launched

first_imgGrants for small R&D projects;Grants for large R&D projects;R&D tax incentives;Grants for feasibility studies;The Technology and Human Resources in Industry Programme (THRIP);The SEDA technology programme;A technology venture capital fund; andR&D in the automotive industry. Subcategories of incentive The first category breaks down into eight subcategories, namely: And the competitiveness enhancement incentives are for: The capital expenditure category includes incentives for: Completing the website’s initial offering is a set of answers to frequently asked questions on incentives and the process of applying for them. SAinfo reporter Concept, research and development incentives – for private sector businesses that invest in the creation, design and improvement of new products and processes.Capital expenditure incentives – for companies that want to acquire or upgrade assets in order either to establish or expand their business’ productive capacity.Competitiveness enhancement incentives – for investments that facilitate increased competitiveness, sustainable economic growth and development in a specific sector. 15 June 2012 Businesses looking to get involved in creating employment and growing productive capacity in South Africa can now access information on government investment incentives through a one-stop portal, www.investmentincentives.co.za . The government offers a wide range of incentive schemes to encourage the growth of competitive new enterprises and the creation of sustainable employment. However, these have tended to become lost from view within the websites of particular departments. This week’s launch of the Government Investment Incentives portal is set to change all that.Promoting private sector involvement A joint project of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), the Economic Development Department and the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC), the new website pulls together state incentive schemes, including grants and tax breaks, together in one easily navigable package. “It is important to establish sustainable enterprises to boost job creation and to increase the state’s participation in development,” Meryl Mamathuba, head of the IDC’s development finance department, said in a statement on Wednesday. “Ultimately, the aim is to promote private sector involvement in both the creation of productive capacity and research and development (R&D) in the country,” Mamathuba said.Three types of incentive The website helps the potential applicant find the incentive that might fit by dividing state incentives into three categories: Business process services (outsourcing);Black business supplier development;Export marketing and investment assistance;Sector specific assistance;Film production;Competitiveness in the clothing and textiles industries;Co-operatives;Female economic empowerment through the Bavumile and Isivande Women’s Fund; andManufacturing competitiveness enhancement. Small industry;Large industr;Critical infrastructure;Industrial development zones;Capital expenditure in the automotive industry;Foreign investment;Capital expenditure in the textiles industry; andManufacturing competitiveness enhancement.last_img read more

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AJ Baltes, Aug. 24

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We finally got some rain. Early last week we got 1.75 inches and I heard anywhere from 2.5 inches down to .75-inch rains around here. It came down pretty hard for the first 1.25 inches and we got the other half inch in two other rains after that, so it had a little time to soak in.The rain will help finish up the early-planted stuff and really help the late-planted stuff. We have corn that is anywhere from full dent to still filling out kernels yet. I had a customer do some chopping last week before the rain and it was yielding really well for him.In some areas, the dry weather got pretty bad and in other areas it still looks pretty nice. Some of the later stuff will still be determined by the fall and how late of a frost we get. I am going to look at some more corn tonight we are going to be chopping and they said it looks pretty good.We saw a little northern corn leaf blight when we were looking at fields, but not as much as what we normally get. There is a little disease in the beans here and there but nothing major and there was some insect leaf feeding but not anything that will hurt yields. Overall, stuff looks pretty good but it really will be hard to tell until the combines get in the fields, especially the beans.The beans that we first planted are just starting to turn color and get a little yellow in them. They should be finishing the pods out. The later beans were flowered before this rain with just a few pods at the bottom, so I am hoping the rain will get more pods on them and get them filled out.There are more chances for rain on Sunday and through next week. It is Fair week, so we will probably get rain at least one day I would think. Hopefully we get a late frost and those beans can keep growing. If so, I think they’ll do alright.There has been quite a bit of second cutting grass hay taken off around here in between the rains over the last couple of weeks. A lot of guys were waiting for another rain to cut and I think it could make a big difference. I am guessing the guys with alfalfa are on the third or fourth cutting.We are green chopping some cover crops for a neighbor’s beef cows today. It is a 15-way after-wheat blend we mixed up. It makes a decent amount of tonnage. We don’t have to go too far before we get a forage wagon filled up. We chop it high so it can regrow and overwinter. It is a chance to get out on some of the old equipment because we have an Oliver Super 77 and we run on that.last_img read more

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Announcing ReadWriteBiz, Our New Channel on Small-Medium Business

first_imgWe’re pleased to announce the launch of our fourth channel: ReadWriteBiz. This new subsite will be a resource and guide for small to medium businesses, so it’s targeted to an audience somewhere in between our ReadWriteStart channel (startups) and ReadWriteEnterprise (large companies). ReadWriteBiz is sponsored by Yola.com, a website builder and hosting service.We have a new writer for ReadWriteBiz, John Paul Titlow from Philadelphia, PA. Welcome John to the team!ReadWriteWeb continues to expand its content via channels, which are subsites focused on a particular niche. Expect to see more channels launched during 2010. Tags:#biz#Features Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting richard macmanus 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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