Loan approval completes financing for North End

first_imgThe final piece of financing for the long-awaited North Street revitalization project in Burlington’s Old North End has been approved by the State Infrastructure Bank (SIB) board of directors. A $304,531 SIB loan to the City of Burlington completes a state, federal, and local financing package for the $6.6 million revitalization project, and project construction has begun. The North End revitalization project has been in the active planning stages since 1998. Major elements of the project include considerable street repaving, improving pedestrian access and safety by enhancing sidewalks and traffic signals, installing underground utilities, planting trees, upgrading street lighting and other improvements.last_img read more

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Zack says ABA ethics and MDP work bear watching

first_imgZack says ABA ethics and MDP work bear watchingABA activities dealing with ethics and multijurisdictional practices should be closely watched, according to a former Florida Bar president who has served as state delegate to the ABA House of Delegates for the last three years. Zack says ABA ethics and MDP work bear watching Steve Zack Steve Zack also told the Bar Board of Governors last month that the ABA will still have a role in reviewing federal judicial nominees, even though President Bush has ended the near 48-year practice of having the ABA screen all nominees. Zack reported that he had spoken with ABA President Martha Barnett, who had met with Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee.center_img “Sen. Hatch said to her that the ABA will be part of the process,” Zack related. “Both the Republicans and Democrats in the Senate and the House want to know what the ABA’s position is; they just don’t want the ABA to have a unique position.”The House of Delegates in August will take up the Ethics 2000 commission report, and he said several aspects of that proposal may interest The Florida Bar.One section bans sex between attorneys and clients “which is referred to by the ABA as prohibited transactions,” Zack said.Another section greatly expands disqualifications for lawyers who change law firms, which could lead to the entire firm being disqualified from a matter. There’s also a provision, he said, that could lead to a law firm being disciplined if one member does something wrong.Also included is a safe harbor provision on the unlicensed practice of law. He recommended that the board look at those items and quickly respond to the ABA.While the House of Delegates rejected a proposal last year that could have lead to multidisciplinary practices, the House will get proposals on multijurisdictional practices this summer and the impact could be just as far reaching, Zack said. Because it is a new, major issue, he said the House may seek more time to review recommendations coming from a special commission.He said other state bars will be looking to see what The Florida Bar’s position on that issue is. June 1, 2001 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Prison teaches ex-lawyer the dangers of ‘insatiable greed’

first_img Prison teaches ex-lawyer the dangers of ‘insatiable greed’ Associate EditorTen months ago, Ed Leinster poured out his “riches to rags” story of going from prosperous Orlando criminal defense attorney to hopeless drunk, doing prison time for his seventh DUI, this time nearly killing a woman in a car crash, and finally being disbarred.The September 1 Bar News chronicled the grip alcohol had on his life: his breakfast of desperation guzzling a bottle of wine as soon as the grocery store opened at 7 a.m., chunks of time totally wiped from memory, and the twisted logic of buying liquor in miniature bottles to give the illusion he was drinking less.“I had reached that absolutely rock bottom where I was going to kill myself drinking with-in two weeks, if I had not been arrested and held in a place with no choice. I had to be there. There was no other place.” Leinster said last August, while serving four years of a five-year prison sentence on work release, locked up at night in the Department of Corrections and working during the day as a paralegal for lawyer Marc Lubet.Today, Leinster is in a much better place — geographically and emotionally. And he said he’s learned the hard way quite a few lessons about how not to be a lawyer driven to destruction by insatiable greed.His story, as harrowing as it is, is not that rare for lawyers, says Michael Cohen, executive director of Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc.As for Leinster’s deep denial that kept him from seeking help earlier or heeding assistance he was given, Cohen said, “He is not the exception, nor is the fact that he is in recovery after going through such a horrendous experience. I could recite 20 Ed Leinsters off the top of my head without going into the files.”Unfortunately, Cohen said, many lawyers have difficulty seeking help for their problems — whether it’s alcoholism, drug abuse, gambling addictions, depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, or other mental health issues.“We’re taught we can reason or argue our way out of anything,” Cohen explains. “We’re taught it’s a sign of weakness to ask for help. And all of this works against us to let the illness progress.”During Leinster’s troubles with the Bar, he was offered help many times, but rejected it or barely went through the motions, even turning in someone else’s urine for required analysis.“It’s like someone with cancer,” Cohen said of the disease of alcoholism. “One person may respond to a certain type of therapy, and with others you have to look for a more aggressive therapy, and at some point, hopefully, it takes. Sometimes, that treatment, unfortunately, is hitting rock bottom. Part of the disease process is the denial. You wonder, ‘How could he not get it the first time they took his license, or his second DUI?’ That’s the denial. It’s not that they are more stupid or immoral. It’s the severity of the disease. Sometimes the treatment is like Ed losing everything and sitting in jail and realizing, ‘I do have a problem, and I am now ready to do everything necessary to treat this illness.’“Sometimes, the treatment is death. That sounds harsh. But there is a saying in AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) that ‘When you go visit someone in the cemetery, that’s the only time they are sober.’”Since his release from prison in November, Leinster has been living in Colorado, where the view from his cabin is the base of a ski lift and mountains stretching high in the sky. He lost his driver’s license, so he rides his bike. He lost his license to practice law, so he gets by doing legal research and helping write briefs for a handful of Florida lawyers who know how sharp his mind can be when he’s not drinking.His wife, Faith, is a nurse and has stuck by him. He’s teaching their 6-year-old daughter Madison to ski, the little girl who once visited him in prison at that place she called “where they keep the daddies.”And he’s teaching himself how to readjust his priorities to enjoy the simple pleasures of life and find happiness that money can’t buy.When Leinster thinks about how ruthlessly competitive he once was as a lawyer, he says now: “The whole practice boiled down to money. It’s bloody awful to watch the abject greed. I wish I could pass this on to criminal lawyers: Don’t care so much about getting the whole pie. Take a look at your practice, and take pride in what you do.”Greed fed the stress that fueled the alcoholism, is how Leinster describes his fall to despair.“At some point in life, I didn’t have all that money. I didn’t require all that for status and ego,” Leinster says of his former life of seemingly having it all as he amassed his fatal fortune: a bustling criminal defense practice, a big house on a lake, a boat docked in St. Petersburg, and a ski cabin in Colorado.As he said while still serving time, “You sit in prison for a while, and you realize just how futile and frustrating and meaningless your life is. You realize a half-million dollars is not all that it is cracked up to be. Four years of utter despair and deprivation put a different slant on fast cars and big boats. I’m not the same man driven by the same demons and the same greed.”Cohen said Florida Lawyers Assistance is seeing more and more mental health problems with lawyers that he once attributed to the fallout from the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Now, Cohen believes the surge in calls for help is the result of “an increasing number of lawyers along with a falling economy. And practicing law is more competitive, much less collegial, much more cutthroat, and with fewer rewards. It’s a lot less fun for a lot less money.”These days, Leinster says, “Drinking is not an issue at all.” His former problems — the demands he put on himself, that “unless things went my way, I was a miserable bastard” — are not driving his life anymore.He is happy, he says, to wake up sober, not crave a drink, find joy in just being alive and loved by his family, and having enough paralegal work to pay the bills. Eventually, he will work on getting his civil rights restored and try to get back his license to practice law.For now, being free and being sober, Leinster says, is enough to make him grateful. For more information about Florida Lawyer Assistance, Inc., check out the Web page at www.fla-lap.org or call the FLA toll-free hotline at 1-800-282-8981, or the FLA judge’s hotline at (888) 972-4040. Prison teaches ex-lawyer the dangers of ‘insatiable greed’ June 1, 2003 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Educating emerging leaders is the future of credit unions

first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pembroke Since joining CUES in March 2013, John Pembroke has played a leadership role in developing and launching a new direction in CUES’ strategy, branding and culture. Under his guidance, CUES … Web: www.cues.org Details At CUES, we believe that investing in the next generation of leaders is incredibly important to the credit union industry.This is why our mission includes educating and developing future leaders. This is why we celebrated the attendance of so many millennials at our recent Directors Conference—and why the event program included a session in which young board members gave pointers about recruiting millennial directors. This is also why we’re evolving our very successful, decade-old CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec challenge into our new CUES Emerge program, which combines online learning, peer collaboration and an exciting competition component.While many emerging leaders are young people, an important feature of the new CUES program is that emerging leaders of all ages are encouraged to participate. Another key component of CUES Emerge is that education is front and center for all participants, rather than the prize for the ultimate winner. I’m also really pleased that all participants in the new challenge who successfully complete the online classes, peer sessions and a business case will receive our new CCM (Certified Credit Union Manager) designation.In addition to all the education you’ll get from participating, being part of CUES Emerge in 2020 will be a great way for program participants to learn about or deepen their use of their CUES membership benefits, as the educational components of the program will be delivered via CUES Elite Access courses, the CUESNet online forum and CUES Learning Portal.Here are more details on the path CUES Emerge participants will follow:First, they’ll need to apply. Up to 30 applicants will be accepted into a six-week online course that includes live instruction and an opportunity to collaborate with other participants. Program participants will take three Elite Access classes held every other week. These interactive online sessions will build knowledge and understanding through connections with subject matter experts and peers. Three Mastermind sessions will be held between each Elite Access class. These cohort discussions and workgroups will support the application of learning and guide business case development. The course will culminate with each participant creating and delivering a business case.At that point, a judging panel will review the submitted business cases and select five finalists to move forward in the competition. The five finalists will further refine and evolve their business cases with the help of professional coaches and credit union mentors, then present their polished business cases during a dynamic online pitch show.Based on the business cases and presentations, a panel of judges will select the top three emerging leaders. All three of these individuals will receive an education and coaching package that includes registration to the CUES School of Applied Strategic Management in 2021. When they complete this school, they will earn the CSE (Certified Senior Executive) designation.The judging panel will also select the ultimate winner. The 2020 CUES Emerging Leader will receive an all-expenses-paid trip to CEO/Executive Team Network™, slated for Nov. 2-4, 2020, in Austin, Texas, where they will be recognized, plus an ongoing coaching package. The winner will also receive an ongoing leadership coaching package.Would this program be just the thing for you? Or maybe for a member of your team? I hope you’ll check it out and apply—or encourage one of your colleagues to do so. The future of credit unions in 2020 and beyond depends on how well we choose—and prepare—our emerging leaders.last_img read more

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Gedson Fernandes: Benfica midfielder could return from loan at Tottenham in January | Football News

first_imgWest Ham have made a revised offer for Gedson FernandesImage:Gedson Fernandes has been one of Benfica’s brightest young prospects in recent years Giovani Lo Celso is also beginning to find form after injury and Harry Winks has impressed, leaving no room in the first-team for the struggling Dele Alli either. He SportTV: “For me it is never a problem, but a solution. Having him in the squad, even if he is not called up and not playing, is an extremely comfortable situation.- Advertisement – Despite once being considered one of Portugal’s brightest prospects, he had fallen out of the Benfica first-team too prior to his arrival in North London, and he has made only 13 appearances for Spurs so far, and none in the Premier League this term.Mourinho has suggested to a Portuguese broadcaster that Benfica are considering calling the 21-year-old midfielder back when the transfer window reopens in 2021. “I will never be the one to push him or say that I don’t want him here. But I understand the situation of the kid and Benfica.“If the club wants to end the relationship here, we will be here to collaborate, because we want the good of the player. Benfica has the power to decide and will be accepted by us.”Spurs have further bolstered their midfield since Gedson’s arrival, signing Pierre-Emile Hojbjerg, and Mourinho appears to have settled on an impressive central trio of Hojbjerg, Moussa Sissoko and Tanguy Ndombele.- Advertisement – Gedson Fernandes’ loan spell at Tottenham could end in January, manager Jose Mourinho has admitted.The young Benfica midfielder joined Spurs on an 18-month loan with an option to buy in January 2019, but he has struggled to make an impact and break into the first team.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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MedImmune says chilled flu vaccine works as well as frozen

first_img The study involved 414 children aged 5 to 8 years who received two doses of vaccine and 566 children 9 and older who received one dose of vaccine. Immunogenicity was assessed by measuring antibody levels in the blood serum for each of the three strains in the vaccine. Before participants received their first dose of vaccine, investigators took serum samples. They repeated the step 28 to 35 days after the last dose of vaccine. Jun 23, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – A refrigerated form of MedImmune’s FluMist intranasal influenza vaccine has been shown to be as effective as the standard frozen form in stimulating the immune system, the company says. A Washington Post report said the need to store FluMist in a freezer has hindered widespread adoption of the nasal spray vaccine. Standard flu shots are stored in refrigerators, and the need for freezer storage causes inconvenience for many clinics, the story said. The study results will allow MedImmune to seek Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for CAIV-T in healthy people aged 5 to 49, said Edward M. Connor, MD, executive vice president and chief medical officer for the company. Approval will allow the company to replace the frozen version of the vaccine in the marketplace. The frozen FluMist vaccine has been licensed for use in healthy people aged 5 to 49 since June 2003. Americans used about 2 million doses of FluMist this past flu season, the Post report said. Editor’s note: The University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), publisher of this Web site, participated in a MedImmune-sponsored, school-based intervention study of FluMist in children in the past year. The Post reported that MedImmune will seek federal approval for CAIV-T for the 2007-08 flu season.center_img See also: Other studies are under way to compare the immunogenicity of CAIV-T with that of injectable flu vaccine in children aged 6 months to 5 years, Connor said. The Post said the intranasal vaccine could have a competitive edge over injected vaccines in this age-group. The results show that the refrigerated vaccine, called cold adapted influenza vaccine, trivalent (CAIV-T), prompted post-vaccination antibody levels for all three flu strains that were equivalent to those induced by the frozen formulation of FluMist, MedImmune said. The news release did not list the specific antibody levels. Preliminary results from a randomized, double-blind, phase 3 bridging study involving 980 people at 26 US sites show comparable immune responses for the frozen formulation already on the market and the refrigerated vaccine, according to a MedImmune news release. MedImmune news releasehttp://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=83037&p=irol-investornewsArticle&ID=721167&highlightlast_img read more

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Denpasar authorities foil alleged attempt to smuggle thousands of birds

first_imgThe Denpasar Agriculture Quarantine Agency in Bali has foiled an alleged attempt to smuggle thousands of birds without health certificates to regions in Java Island on Monday evening.I Putu Terunanegara, the quarantine agency head, said the birds were initially to be brought to Yogyakarta and Solo in Central Java.However, since Denpasar is still dealing with avian influenza, every bird taken out from the area has to possess a health certificate. “We have to perform strict monitoring, since birds and chicken are the carriers of bird flu,” Terunegara said as quoted by kompas.com on Tuesday.Officers from the Denpasar Quarantine Agency found thousands of birds inside a pickup truck at a parking lot in Gilimanuk Maneuver Port in Jembrana on Monday. The birds were kept inside 27 cardboard boxes with holes and 48 plastic baskets. “They used a catering truck for a Minang restaurant to fool the quarantine center officers,” Terunagara said.The birds included 450 of the species Horsfield’s bush lark, 340 yellow vented bulbul, 600 bar-winged prinia, 1,040 yellow-ringed white eye, 38 pied bush chat, 70 Mees’s white eye, 70 Padda, 70 Lonchura and 20 orange-headed thrush.None of the birds are of protected species.The officers also found that some of the birds had already died due to poor air circulation.The two drivers of the catering truck were not arrested, as authorities allowed them to complete the documents as stipulated in Law No. 21/2019 on Animal, Fisheries and Plants Quarantine. (dpk)Topics :last_img read more

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Brisbane history hits the market for multimillion-dollar buyers

first_imgResidence 2 at Yungaba Residences has hit the market and will have high-end buyers aquiver.PART of Brisbane’s irreplaceable heritage is up for sale, but it’ll take deep pockets to make it yours.The Yungaba Immigration Centre at Kangaroo Point was designed and built in the late 1800s as a first home for overseas arrivals to our shores.Fast forward more than a century and this magnificent structure has been transformed into the The Residences, Yungaba — a project comprising 10 homes on a riverside setting.Residence 2 has just hit the market for $3.3 million. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours agoThe original residents would never have dreamt what their first home would look like in the future.Known as 2/110 Main Street, Kangaroo Point and named Bradfield after Dr John Job Crew Bradfield, consulting engineer for the Story Bridge, the home provides for 427sq m across living area, outdoor space and car accommodation.The two-level, four bedroom residence has been restored and refurbished to create a modern home in this place of deep history. Rooms come with a view of the river and the Story Bridge substructure.And the river outlook from your veranda will have you feeling like the height of the turn-off-the-century social scene.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclaircenter_img Soaring ceilings and high-end finishes are part of the deal.The striking heritage facade is camouflage to a contemporary internal finish including painted brick walls, soaring ceilings with exposed beams and clerestory skylight windows.You won’t have to struggle in discomfort like some of its first residents either. Fittings included high-end kitchen appliances, smart lighting, security system and airconditioning.last_img read more

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Unilever to close defined benefit pension fund in Netherlands

first_imgUnilever Netherlands is planning to close Progress, its €6bn defined benefit scheme, and replace it with a collective defined contribution (CDC) pension fund as of 1 January.The decision comes as a consequence of a collective labour agreement (CAO) between the employer and unions, which included a new pension plan for the company’s 3,000 Dutch staff. Frans van de Veen of union CNV Vakmensen said: “The advantage of the new scheme (Progress II) for Unilever is that its pension liabilities are to become stable. And for the workers, it is good to have clarity about their pensions arrangements.”The accrual rate under the new pension plan is to drop slightly to the tax-facilitated percentage of 1.875. At the same time, Unilever is to improve the arrangement by lowering the franchise – the part of the salary exempt from pensions accrual – by €1,000 to €12,642.Unlike with many other CDC schemes, the contribution has not been fixed for five years.“The premium is to be established annually and will, in part, be dependent on the level of interest rates,” said Van de Veen.Because Unilever will not have to meet any funding shortfall, Van de Veen said he expected the future contribution would be quite stable.Progress II is to start with a €30m contribution from the employer to increase the potential for indexation.According Van de Veen, only a “very bleak scenario” would threaten the granting of indexation.Under the new CAO, the premium for Unilever’s staff will be increased by 0.5 percentage points to 3%, but the increase will be offset by a salary increase of 5.65%.With a nominal funding of 138% and a real coverage of 104% as of the end of October, Progress is one of the best performing pension funds in the Netherlands.last_img read more

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Hugo Chavez: Cuban TV airs new footage

first_img Sharing is caring! Tweet 13 Views   no discussions The new images show an apparently well Hugo ChavezNew pictures and video footage of Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez have been shown on Cuban state television.Very little has been seen or heard from Mr Chavez since he had an emergency operation in Cuba on 10 June, prompting speculation about his state of health.The new images show an apparently well Mr Chavez dressed in a tracksuit in the colours of the Venezuelan flag, chatting animatedly with Fidel Castro.Cuban TV said the images were taken on Tuesday.The footage was the lead item on Cuban news. The newscaster described the meeting as “fraternal”, but he gave no details about the Venezuelan president’s condition.It showed the two men standing and sitting down as they chatted.The BBC’s Michael Voss in the Cuban capital Havana said the footage seemed to be taken in the grounds of the hospital where Mr Chavez had his operation.Mr Chavez’s unexpectedly long absence from Venezuela has prompted debate there on whether he should delegate executive power to his vice-president.Venezuelan officials have said the surgery was for a pelvic abscess, but there has been speculation in the Venezuelan and foreign press that the president’s condition could be more serious.Uncertain return“Let these images serve to bring peace to the people of Venezuela regarding the health of President Chavez,” Venezuelan Communications Minister Andres Izarra said on state TV.“To those of you who are speculating over the president’s health, there he is… fine, recovering well.”Until the release of the latest images, only one set of photos of Mr Chavez since his operation had been made public.These showed him flanked by Fidel and Raul Castro – the former and current leader of communist Cuba – who were apparently visiting him in hospital in Havana.Mr Chavez had also given only one interview – by phone to a Venezuelan-funded television channel, Telesur.And in the past few days, there have been several messages posted on his Twitter account.But his output has been noticeably restricted, especially when compared with his normal, frequent appearances in the media.There is as yet no clear timetable for his return.But on Sunday, the president of the National Assembly, Fernando Soto Rojas, said Mr Chavez could be back in the country in time for Venezuela’s bicentennial celebrations on 5 July.BBC News Sharecenter_img Share NewsRegional Hugo Chavez: Cuban TV airs new footage by: – June 29, 2011 Sharelast_img read more

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