Full Cast Announced of The Audience on Broadway, Starring Helen Mirren

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on June 28, 2015 View Comments Related Shows Dakin Matthews (Rocky) and Rod McLachlan (Holiday) will play Prime Ministers Winston Churchill and Gordon Brown, respectively, opposite Helen Mirren in The Audience. Directed by Stephen Daldry, Peter Morgan’s play will begin previews on February 17, 2015 and run through June 28. Opening night is set for March 8 at Broadway’s Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre. For sixty years Elizabeth II (Mirren) has met each of her twelve Prime Ministers in a weekly audience at Buckingham Palace. Both parties have an unspoken agreement never to repeat what is said, not even to their spouses. The Audience imagines a series of pivotal meetings between the Downing Street incumbents and their Queen. From Churchill to Cameron, each Prime Minister uses these private conversations as a sounding board and a confessional—sometimes intimate, sometimes explosive. In turn, the Queen can’t help but reveal her own self as she advises, consoles and, on occasion, teases. These private audiences chart the arc of the second Elizabethan Age, from the beginning of Elizabeth II’s reign to today. The Audience Rounding out the cast will be Elizabeth Teeter as Young Elizabeth, Henny Russell as Queen’s Secretary, Tracy Sallows as Bobo McDonald, Anthony Cochrane as Cecil Beaton / Detective / Bishop, Graydon Long as Footman / Beefeater and Jason Loughlin as Footman / Beefeater. Ensemble members include Michael Rudko and Tony Ward. They join the previously announced Dylan Baker, Judith Ivey, Geoffrey Beevers, Michael Elwyn, Richard McCabe and Rufus Wright.last_img read more

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Judy Kaye, Carrie St. Louis & More Tapped for Wicked on B’way

first_imgThrillifying news from Broadway’s Wicked! Two-time Tony winner Judy Kaye will begin performances as Madame Morrible in the long-running tuner on February 16. Meanwhile, on February 2, Carrie St. Louis and Peter Scolari have been tapped to assume the roles of Glinda and the Wizard, taking over for Kara Lindsay and Fred Applegate, respectively.Kaye took home the Tony for Nice Work If You Can Get It and Phantom; St. Louis made her Broadway debut in Rock of Ages and has been playing Glinda on the National Tour. Scolari, perhaps best known for Bosom Buddies, was last seen on the Great White Way in Bronx Bombers.Also joining the cast at the Gershwin Theatre on February 2 will be Dawn Cantwell (for Arielle Jacobs) as Nessarose, Michael Genet (for Timothy Britten Parker) as Dr. Dillamond and Zachary Piser (for Robin De Jesus ) as Boq.Rachel Tucker will continue to defy gravity as Elphaba and Jonah Platt remains as Fiyero. Kathy Fitzgerald is scheduled to play the role of Madame Morrible from February 2 through February 14, stepping in for Michele Lee. Star Files Judy Kaye Wicked View Commentscenter_img from $95.00 Related Shows Carrie St. Louislast_img read more

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Watch the First Teaser for Fox’s Rocky Horror Picture Show

first_imgLaverne Cox in ‘The Rocky Horror Picture Show'(Photo: Fox) View Comments Shivering with antici…pation? Perhaps this will hold you over. Take a look below at the first teaser of Fox’s Rocky Horror Picture Show. As previously reported, the Kenny Ortega-helmed remake is set to have us jump to the left, et cetera this October, just in time for Halloween. While you wait (and plan your costume), check out Heathers star Ryan McCartan, Broadway alum Reeve Carney, Tony winner Annaleigh Ashford, Victoria Justice, Christina Milian and—of course—Laverne Cox in their late night double feature finest!last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: Ralph Fiennes’ Richard III Eyes N.Y. Transfer & More

first_img Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Ralph Fiennes’ Richard III Eyes New York TransferThere’ll be no need for discontent if this happens! The Almeida Theatre’s production of Richard III, led by Ralph Fiennes, could be heading to the Big Apple. Helmed by Tony winner Rupert Goold (King Charles III, American Psycho) and also starring Vanessa Redgrave, Shakespeare’s classic may also tranfer to the West End, the Daily Mail reports. The show is currently running at the Almeida through August 6 and will also broadcast live to movie theaters around the world on July 21.Waitress Aiming for London’s West EndPies all round! Waitress is circling a West End opening in spring 2017. According to the Daily Mail, the producers and director, Diane Paulus, are looking at potential theaters for Sara Bareilles’ tuner; no word yet on whether Tony winner Jessie Mueller would cross the pond with the production. Waitress is currently baking up a storm at Broadway’s Brooks Atkinson Theatre.Watch Broadway Faves Tackle Difficult PeopleIt’s a case of spot your Broadway favorite in the first trailer of the second season of Difficult People, starring New York BFF’s Julie Klausner and Billy Eichner. Watch out below for Lin-Manuel Miranda, Andrea Martin, Jackie Hoffman and Derrick Baskin; the first two episodes of the upcoming series will be available on Hulu on July 12. View Comments Ralph Fiennes in ‘Richard III'(Photo: Marc Brenner)last_img read more

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Dean finalists chosen

first_imgBy Larry B. DendyUniversity of GeorgiaThe search for a new dean of the University of Georgia College ofAgricultural and Environmental Sciences has been narrowed tothree finalists. The three will visit the campus this month tomeet with faculty, staff and students in the college.A search committee selected the finalists from candidatesidentified in a national search. They are: Joseph C. Joyce, executiveassociate vice president for agriculture and natural resources inthe Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences at the Universityof Florida.D.C. Coston, associatedirector of the Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station and aprofessor of horticulture at Oklahoma State University.Sonny Ramaswamy, head of theentomology department and University Distinguished Professor atKansas State University. The new dean will succeed Gale A. Buchanan, who stepped down asdean Dec. 31 and will retire from the university April 30. JosefM. Broder is serving as interim dean until a permanent dean canbegin work.BackgroundJoyce has been with IFAS in the University of Florida since 1983.An expert in aquatic plant management and control, he is a pastpresident of the International Aquatic Plant Management Society.He is also a retired brigadier general in the U.S. Army Reserve.Coston is interim associate director of the Oklahoma CooperativeExtension Service. Before joining Oklahoma State in 1995, he wasat Clemson University as associate dean and associate director ofthe South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. He’s anauthority on natural resources systems and management.Ramaswamy is an expert on insect pheromones and reproductivebiology. Before becoming head of the KSU entomology department in1977, he was a professor at Mississippi State University. Hehelped create a butterfly conservatory and insect zoo at KSU andhas written more than 100 journal articles and book chapters.VisitsJoyce will visit UGA Feb. 16-19. He will present an open seminarFeb. 17 at 2 p.m. in room 307 of Conner Hall. It will bebroadcast by satellite to faculty at CAES units in Tifton,Griffin, Statesboro and Fort Valley.Coston will be on campus Feb. 20-22 and will present an openseminar Feb. 21 at 1:30 p.m. Ramaswamy will visit Feb. 23-25,with an open seminar on Feb. 24 at 2:15 p.m. These two seminarsites have not yet been set. Both, though, will be broadcast bysatellite to other locations.George Benson, dean of UGA’s Terry College of Business, chairsthe search committee.(Larry Dendy is the assistant to the associate vice presidentfor public affairs of the University of Georgia.)last_img read more

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07 Little big garden

first_imgBy William Terry KelleyUniversity of GeorgiaYou don’t have to have a lot of room to plant a vegetable garden. With a little effort, you can turn a small space into a great place to grow plenty of fresh produce. Volume XXXIINumber 1Page 7 Square-foot gardening and raised-bed gardening are two terms often used to describe ways to plant gardens in small spaces.A raised bed has other advantages, too. Planting in these beds provides greater drainage and may allow the use of otherwise poorly drained areas. It also makes garden chores more amenable.Raised beds allow for planting earlier in the spring, too, because they warm up quicker. Pest control can be easier, too. Placing hardware cloth at the bottom of the bed can keep out burrowing varmints, and netting can keep out birds and some insects.Raised beds are fairly easy to make and can range from the rudimentary to the elaborate. They can be temporary or permanent. Pressure-treated lumber makes an excellent siding to confine the soil. Just don’t use creosote-treated wood. You can make raised beds without sides, but they tend to erode.How to do itMake the sides of the bed 6 to 8 inches above the ground. It’s good to include sand, compost or other organic matter in the bed, but it’s best to spade or till the soil underneath. Mix it in the bed so at least a third of the bed is actual soil or added topsoil. Mix in any needed lime at this time.Only small tillers can be used in permanent beds. Once the bed has been prepared for the season, you don’t generally have to till again.Make beds no more than 4 feet wide so you can access them from the sides. This allows for weeding, planting and harvesting without actually stepping into the bed.Vegetable yields are greater when you use raised beds with plants spaced much closer together. The closer spacing enhances weed control, since the dense canopy shades out weeds. The idea is to have the plants close enough to just touch but not compete with one another.Best spacingGenerally, if you place plants or seeds a little farther apart in the row than normal and then use that same spacing between rows, the space will be adequate. For instance, rather than spacing cabbage plants 10 inches apart in rows 36 inches apart, space them 15 inches apart in rows 15 inches apart.For vegetables such as beans, it’s best to plant parallel to the row. Plant crops that require fewer plants across the row. Plant faster-growing plants, such as radishes, between slower-growing crops. You can harvest the faster crops quicker and get them out of the way.Trellis tomatoes, cucumbers and pole beans so they take up more room vertically and less horizontally. You’ll be amazed at how many fresh vegetables you can grow in a small garden.(William Terry Kelley is a vegetable horticulturist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Healthy, tasty

first_imgBy Stephanie SchupskaUniversity of GeorgiaTraditional holiday meals with plenty of vegetables put Georgians a step ahead of their neighbors to the north. Vegetables free of extras like butter, breadcrumbs and heavy creams could help Georgians stay healthy, says a University of Georgia expert.“Vegetables, if they’re good, are already sweet,” said Connie Crawley, a UGA Cooperative Extension nutrition and health specialist. “(Southerners) usually cook them to death or throw grease or sugar on them. The best thing to do is just cook them until they’re just done, tender, but not limp.”Visit local farmer’s markets for the freshest varieties of vegetables. In-season winter varieties include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, pumpkins, beets, greens, cauliflower and winter squash like butternut, acorn and spaghetti.Calorie-laden culprits don’t just come in the form of vegetables. Most dishes on holiday tables are loaded with extra fat, salt and sugar.“Turkey is one of the healthier meats if you don’t fry it or baste it to death,” Crawley said. A serving of roasted turkey has about 200 calories, more if fried. Gravy adds 50 calories per tablespoon. A serving of a breadcrumb-topped casserole has 200-plus calories; one roll, 110 calories; a pat of butter, 45 calories; sweet potato casserole, 300 calories; and pumpkin pie, 200 calories. A dollop of whipped cream on top of that pie can add an extra 100 calories.“One of the worst side dishes is stuffing,” she said. “There are so many calories in a small amount. A fourth-cup of dressing is equal to a whole slice of bread. We eat a lot more and with gravy.”A typical holiday meal can add up to 1,000 calories. That’s without piling the food high. For a woman, 1,000 calories can be half or more of her daily calories, Crawley said.To keep calorie counts low, use the smallest plate available and leave space around each food item. Pile food no higher than the thickness of a hand – laid flat, not propped on its side. And wait at least 15 minutes after the meal before choosing a dessert.Crawley offers the following tips for keeping the holidays lean and tasty:• Buy fresh turkey, and cook it in a cooking bag. It’ll be moist and brown without extra fat and sodium. Substitute pork tenderloin or fresh ham for cured ham brined with salt. Check the label to ensure the pork tenderloin isn’t brined.• Make cornbread for dressing with stone-ground cornmeal and whole-wheat flour.• In casseroles, substitute reduced-fat, low-sodium condensed soups for regular canned soups. Use reduced-fat margarine, low-cholesterol egg substitute, reduced-fat cheese and evaporated skim milk. For topping, use whole wheat bread crumbs or low-sodium crackers. • For sweet potato casserole, substitute artificial sweetener for half the sugar or cut the sugar by a third. Use light margarine instead of butter or regular margarine. • In congealed salads, use sugar-free gelatin, fresh or canned fruit in its own juice and reduced-fat cream cheese.• Season cooked vegetables with a little olive oil and a few shakes from a commercial spice-herb mixture. • Serve whole-wheat rolls or bread. Accompany them with reduced-sugar fruit spread or a little olive oil.• Offer one or two desserts. Make one a lower-fat, lower-calorie dessert like regular angel food cake with warm fruit compote, baked apples filled with pecans or banana pudding made with sugar-free vanilla pudding, light whipped cream and reduced-fat vanilla wafers. Have a basket of seasonal fruits on hand as an alternative. “With more variety, people eat more,” Crawley said. “You don’t have to have two kinds of potatoes, multiple vegetable casseroles or four kinds of desserts. A low-calorie dish with high-calorie ones gives people choices.”(Stephanie Schupska is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Dairy Research

first_img“Cows that calve during the summer had to deal with the heat, which makes them not want to eat or do well when they start milking. This study demonstrated that the betaine has the potential to relieve some of that stress and help the cows to metabolically cope better,” Bernard said. “One of the things we do currently to help with heat stress is focus on our structures to provide heat abatement, which includes providing shade and having fans with some type of sprinkler or mister system. We emphasize the use of high-quality forages that are going to be digested better and help maintain intake. Then we look at how we supplement those forages to meet the cow’s needs.”Tao and Bernard also took blood samples from the cows in order to study metabolism. They found that cows fed betaine had higher plasma concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids during the early lactation period.In total, 40 cows were used in the study, which lasted from late September 2015 to late December 2015. Tao hopes to keep working on stress relief in cattle. “It was a very small and easy trial, but I think the betaine supplement during the transition period can provide some benefit to the cows and the producers,” Tao said. (Kyle Dawson is an intern at the UGA Tifton Campus.) “I think the key finding in our research is that when we fed this product, which contains a large amount of betaine, to the transition dairy cows (period between dry and milking), we observed a 6.5-pound-per-day increase in milk production during the first two months of lactation,” Tao said. “We also saw an increase in fat percentage, which is the percentage of fat in the milk. This is quite important for producers in the Southeast because our milk products are paid based on pounds of milk and its fat content.”Betaine is found naturally in molasses made from sugar beets. For this research study, Tao and Bernard made a compound of molasses from sugar cane and sugar beets to provide 9-percent betaine. They fed it to the cows during the dry period and the transition period, which is about 56 days before and after calving. A control group was fed only sugar cane molasses. Betaine is a natural chemical compound that essentially helps to improve cows’ metabolism and milk production.center_img Bernard said that the results of the study will help to reduce the stress cows experience during the hot summers, keeping them healthy and producing more milk. Sha Tao and John Bernard, animal and dairy research scientists at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus, believe that feeding betaine to dairy cows could increase milk production.last_img read more

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Loan approval completes financing for North End

first_imgThe final piece of financing for the long-awaited North Street revitalization project in Burlington’s Old North End has been approved by the State Infrastructure Bank (SIB) board of directors. A $304,531 SIB loan to the City of Burlington completes a state, federal, and local financing package for the $6.6 million revitalization project, and project construction has begun. The North End revitalization project has been in the active planning stages since 1998. Major elements of the project include considerable street repaving, improving pedestrian access and safety by enhancing sidewalks and traffic signals, installing underground utilities, planting trees, upgrading street lighting and other improvements.last_img read more

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Smith Street Design is Open for Business

first_imgSmith Street Design is Open for BusinessSHOREHAM, VT – Smith Street Design is a woman-owned business begun by Liz Whitaker-Freitas in 2005. Smith Street Design is a team of experienced designers, marketers, photographers, programmers and writers offering broad-spectrum marketing services. Their goal is to help businesses with all aspects of their marketing needs.The members of the Smith Street Design team have worked on a variety of accounts including MasterCard, Pacifica Sports Network, Island Oasis, Middlebury College, Shoreham Inn, and the Platt Memorial Library.Smith Street Design was the perfect solution for us – after one meeting they immediately understood what we were looking for and produced a web site that by far exceeded our expectations. We’re thrilled with the photographs and overall look of the site and we’ve had repeated compliments as well as increased business. –Molly and Dominic FrancisSmith Street Design is currently working on a Flash application for Clark University. Samples of all of their work can be viewed at www.smithstreetdesign.com(link is external).Liz Whitaker-FreitasPrincipal802-989-1318info@smithstreetdesign.com(link sends e-mail)last_img read more

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